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Article

Helen K. Henry

Research in the area of human‐computer interfaces offers guidance for enhancing online catalogs to satisfy patrons' information needs in a “user‐friendly” environment…

Abstract

Research in the area of human‐computer interfaces offers guidance for enhancing online catalogs to satisfy patrons' information needs in a “user‐friendly” environment. This article briefly describes human‐computer interfaces and the fundamentals of good human‐computer communication. These concepts are then used as the criteria for evaluating the benefits and shortcomings of San Diego State University Library's INNOPAC, the PAC. In the final analysis, the PAC is not perfect—no system is. It has, however, made strides to overcome some of the failings of second‐generation online public access catalogs.

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Library Hi Tech, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article

The interface between a user and the computer can often be vital in getting data in and out of it. The interface needs to allow for ease of input and ease of displaying…

Abstract

The interface between a user and the computer can often be vital in getting data in and out of it. The interface needs to allow for ease of input and ease of displaying data on the screen — not only results, but also screen layouts, forms, menus, help information and the like. Reading text on a computer screen can be very tiring and a good interface can provide increased legibility, readability and comprehension as well as feedback to the user. Basic design principles for the user interface formulated by Wadlow et al (1991) include the premise that the interface must be consistent — actions and objects should behave similarly across different contexts. In addition, the interface should be predictable — a system in which users can anticipate computer behaviour. Furthermore the interface should have features which put certain decisions in the hands of the users, so that s/he feels in control. Since much human computer interaction takes place in a visual frame then the computer system should be visually appealing. Users should also feel that they are dealing with ‘real’ objects — that what they are doing is really happening.

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The Electronic Library, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article

EFTHIMIS N. EFTHIMIADIS

This review reports on the current state and the potential of tools and systems designed to aid online searching, referred to here as online searching aids. Intermediary…

Abstract

This review reports on the current state and the potential of tools and systems designed to aid online searching, referred to here as online searching aids. Intermediary mechanisms are examined in terms of the two stage model, i.e. end‐user, intermediary, ‘raw database’, and different forms of user — system interaction are discussed. The evolution of the terminology of online searching aids is presented with special emphasis on the expert/non‐expert division. Terms defined include gateways, front‐end systems, intermediary systems and post‐processing. The alternative configurations that such systems can have and the approaches to the design of the user interface are discussed. The review then analyses the functions of online searching aids, i.e. logon procedures, access to hosts, help features, search formulation, query reformulation, database selection, uploading, downloading and post‐processing. Costs are then briefly examined. The review concludes by looking at future trends following recent developments in computer science and elsewhere. Distributed expert based information systems (debis), the standard generalised mark‐up language (SGML), the client‐server model, object‐orientation and parallel processing are expected to influence, if they have not done so already, the design and implementation of future online searching aids.

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Journal of Documentation, vol. 46 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article

J.H. Abawajy

The purpose of this paper is to explore characteristics of human‐computer interaction when the human body and its movements become input for interaction and interface

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore characteristics of human‐computer interaction when the human body and its movements become input for interaction and interface control in pervasive computing settings.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper quantifies the performance of human movement based on Fitt's Law and discusses some of the human factors and technical considerations that arise in trying to use human body movements as an input medium.

Findings

The paper finds that new interaction technologies utilising human movements may provide more flexible, naturalistic interfaces and support the ubiquitous or pervasive computing paradigm.

Practical implications

In pervasive computing environments the challenge is to create intuitive and user‐friendly interfaces. Application domains that may utilize human body movements as input are surveyed here and the paper addresses issues such as culture, privacy, security and ethics raised by movement of a user's body‐based interaction styles.

Originality/value

The paper describes the utilization of human body movements as input for interaction and interface control in pervasive computing settings.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

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Article

Dennis A. Norlin, Elizabeth R. Cardman, Elisabeth B. Davis, Raeann Dossett, Barbara Henigman, William H. Mischo and Leslie Troutman

Shortcomings in the BRS MENTOR mainframe interface and the desirability of using the workstation capabilities of the PC were factors in the decision to develop and…

Abstract

Shortcomings in the BRS MENTOR mainframe interface and the desirability of using the workstation capabilities of the PC were factors in the decision to develop and implement a microcomputer‐based interface to the BRS software and associated databases. The Interface Design Subcommittee's charge was to design and implement the interface components for the Library Information Workstation, a microcomputer public terminal that provides access to local and remote online catalogs, periodical index databases, campus information resources, and information files stored on the microcomputer. This article focuses on the design of the interface to the BRS/SEARCH software and ancillary periodical index databases—initially Current Contents, six Wilson databases, and ERIC.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article

Yu Luo, Zewei Fang, Juzhi Guo, Hao Lu and Juan Li

This paper aims to improve the scene sense of a virtual scene, the welding model of a virtual reality system of riser automatic equipment was constructed using Unity3D and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to improve the scene sense of a virtual scene, the welding model of a virtual reality system of riser automatic equipment was constructed using Unity3D and UG software, which mainly included a welding car, welding guide rail, welding power supply, virtual camera and other equipment and the model was rendered.

Design/methodology/approach

The human-computer interaction page and simulation test of the system was produced using the user interface GUI system for creating a human-computer interaction scene. The operator could capture the welding status of the physical equipment accurately and in real-time so the virtual reality technology was very suitable for the remote monitoring operation integrated with the welding system.

Findings

Human-computer interaction design and collision detection were realized. In addition, the system simulation experiment was accomplished. With the continuous improvement and development of virtual reality technology real-time virtual simulation and monitoring, technology will become the main development trend.

Research limitations/implications

Based on virtual reality, the monitoring system can capture the operation status of physical welding equipment in real-time and accurately, which is very suitable for remote monitoring operation integrated with the welding system and also conducive to improving the monitoring level of the welding process.

Practical implications

This technology is time-saving and money-saving, for the operators do not have to be in a real welding environment and therefore they can get away from dangerous places. Consequently, it can avoid unnecessary injuries and problems.

Social implications

This technology can replace people to enter the dangerous and extreme environment to carry out welding operation, so it becomes the most effective means of nuclear power plant maintenance, space structure construction and marine engineering construction. In addition, it is time-saving and money-saving.

Originality/value

With the rapid development of virtual reality technology in recent years, it is a new research direction to apply virtual reality technology to the remote welding operation. This technology is different from the traditional way of welding for the operators can stay away from the welding scene especially some dangerous places.

Details

Industrial Robot: the international journal of robotics research and application, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

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Article

Nick Joint, Bob Kemp and Susan Ashworth

The GAELS Project is a two‐year project funded by the Scottish Higher Education Funding Council (SHEFC) strategic change initiative, which promotes collaborative…

Abstract

The GAELS Project is a two‐year project funded by the Scottish Higher Education Funding Council (SHEFC) strategic change initiative, which promotes collaborative information services to engineering researchers at Glasgow and Strathclyde Universities. This paper examines the role of user education in this process. We use arguments against the effectiveness of library skills education and evaluative methods learned from human‐computer interface design as a means of improving information skills training and as part of a general reflection on user education and library services. Such an approach shows how networked learning materials can be an effective tool for promoting a collaborative library service across the Glasgow Metropolitan Area Network.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 52 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

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Article

Brian H. Rudall and C.J.H. Mann

This paper aims to review current advances in development of human‐computer interfaces.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review current advances in development of human‐computer interfaces.

Design/methodology/approach

A general review and survey of selected research and development topics.

Findings

Illustrates the multi‐ and trans‐disciplinary natures of studies in cybernetics, systems and management science with a view to further research and development activity.

Practical implications

The choice of reviews provides the awareness of the current trends in these areas of endeavour.

Originality/value

The reviews are selected from a global database and give a studied assessment of current research and development initiatives.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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Article

Victoria Manglano Bosch and Micheline Hancock‐Beaulie

Following a general trend in software development, CDROM applications are increasingly implementing Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs). The general assumption is that GUIs…

Abstract

Following a general trend in software development, CDROM applications are increasingly implementing Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs). The general assumption is that GUIs offer advantages in terms of ease of learning and use, especially for non‐expert users. Moreover, the adoption of GUIs for CDROMs has been suggested as a means of providing a de facto standard interface. This study assesses the appropriateness of GUIs, more specifically Windows‐based interfaces for CDROM. An evaluation model was devised to carry out an expert evaluation of the interfaces of seven CDROM products. The model identified two levels of interaction, the dialogue level and task level, and focused on general interface features, search and retrieval tasks, and output and processing options as well as the help facilities. The results are discussed in the light of HCI Usability Criteria and design guidelines (including general interface design guidelines, specific Windows design guidelines and The CDROM Consistent Interface Guidelines) to assess to what extent the applications comply and appropriate recommendations are made.

Details

Online and CD-Rom Review, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1353-2642

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Article

Ming‐te Lu and Wing‐lok Yeung

The World Wide Web (WWW) or the Web has been recognized as a powerful new information exchange channel in recent years. Today, an ever‐increasing number of businesses have…

Abstract

The World Wide Web (WWW) or the Web has been recognized as a powerful new information exchange channel in recent years. Today, an ever‐increasing number of businesses have set up Web sites to publicize their products and services. However, careful planning and preparation is needed to achieve the intended purpose of this new information exchange channel. This paper proposes a comprehensive framework for effective commercial Web application development based on prior research in hypermedia and human‐computer interfaces. The framework regards Web application development as a special type of software development project. At the onset of the project, its social acceptability is investigated. Next, economic, technical, operational, and organizational viability are examined. For Web page design, both the functionality and usability of Web pages are thoroughly considered. The use of the framework should result in more effective commercial Web application development.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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