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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2010

Marjorie Armstrong‐Stassen and Julian Cattaneo

The purpose of this paper is to examine the association between organizational downsizing and the extent to which organizations are engaging in human resource practices…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the association between organizational downsizing and the extent to which organizations are engaging in human resource practices tailored to the needs of older workers (Study 1) and are providing a supportive training and development climate for older workers (Study 2).

Design/methodology/approach

Study 1 data were obtained from 449 employed individuals aged 50 to 68 years. Study 2 data were obtained from 395 employed individuals aged 50 to 70 years. Respondents were from a broad cross‐section of occupations and organizations across Canada.

Findings

Respondents in downsized organizations indicated that their organizations were significantly less likely to be engaging in human resource practices tailored to older workers and that their organizations had a less supportive training and development climate than their counterparts whose organizations had not downsized.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are based on older workers' perceptions of organizational practices, which may or may not be an accurate reflection of what organizations actually have in place.

Practical implications

Organizations, especially those that have downsized, will be at a disadvantage if they continue to ignore the needs of older workers. Employers will have to change how they view older workers and put in place organizational practices geared to older workers such as those examined in the paper. Ensuring that older workers have the requisite skills and competencies to extend their working lives may require government involvement.

Originality/value

The paper illustrates that downsizing is detrimental to organizational practices that the aging workforce literature identifies as especially important to older workers.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 December 2015

Andrea Kim, Kyongji Han, Joseph R. Blasi and Douglas L. Kruse

Building on economic and psychological ownership theories, this study investigates whether group incentives can reduce shirking because these practices enable employees to…

Abstract

Building on economic and psychological ownership theories, this study investigates whether group incentives can reduce shirking because these practices enable employees to feel psychological ownership that motivates them to prevent their own and coworkers shirking in a collective work setting. We analyzed a sample of 38,475 employees in eight companies that participated in the survey administered by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) in 2005. Our findings reveal that (1) short-term-oriented group incentives (STOGIs) and long-term-oriented group incentives (LTOGIs) are positively related to self-shirking regulation and coworker-shirking intervention; (2) STOGIs have stronger relationships with these anti-shirking outcomes than LTOGIs; and (3) the interaction between LTOGIs and formal training is positively related to these anti-shirking outcomes. Although some scholars are concerned about the free rider problem in the collective working and rewarding structure, our work demonstrates how and why employee shirking may be mitigated in such settings.

Details

Advances in the Economic Analysis of Participatory & Labor-Managed Firms
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-379-2

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 July 2004

Douglas Kruse, Richard Freeman, Joseph Blasi, Robert Buchele, Adria Scharf, Loren Rodgers and Chris Mackin

What enables some employee ownership firms to overcome the free rider problem and motivate employees to improve performance? This study analyzes the role of human resource

Abstract

What enables some employee ownership firms to overcome the free rider problem and motivate employees to improve performance? This study analyzes the role of human resource policies in the performance of employee ownership companies, using employee survey data from 14 companies and a national sample of employee-owners. Between-firm comparisons of 11 ESOP firms show that an index of human resource policies, nominally controlled by management, is positively related to employee reports of co-worker performance and other good workplace outcomes (including perceptions of fairness, good supervision, and worker input and influence). Within-firm comparisons in three ESOP firms, and exploratory results from a national survey, show that employee-owners who participate in employee involvement committees are more likely to exert peer pressure on shirking co-workers. We conclude that an understanding of how and when employee ownership works successfully requires a three-pronged analysis of: (1) the incentives that ownership gives; (2) the participative mechanisms available to workers to act on those incentives; and (3) the corporate culture that battles against tendencies to free ride.

Details

Employee Participation, Firm Performance and Survival
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-114-9

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2020

Poonam Veer Ramjeawon and Jennifer Rowley

Universities need to manage their knowledge assets, and, to work creatively to maximize the enablers and minimize the barriers associated with knowledge management…

Abstract

Purpose

Universities need to manage their knowledge assets, and, to work creatively to maximize the enablers and minimize the barriers associated with knowledge management processes. This research offers a comparative perspective on knowledge management in universities in two countries whose university sectors are at different stages of their development, South Africa and Mauritius.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with expert informants from 10 high-ranking universities in Mauritius and South Africa, who held senior roles in research and its management within their respective universities

Findings

Both enablers and barriers (eandb) were evident in relation to: strategies and policies, organizational structures, rewards and incentives, culture, technology, leadership, human resources, resources and funding, and university-industry linkages, although the significance of these eandbs varied between the three knowledge processes, knowledge creation, knowledge sharing and knowledge transfer. Overall, Mauritius, with a less developed university sector, faced more challenges in respect of knowledge management than did South Africa.

Originality/value

This study's theoretical contribution is a holistic framework for enabling KM in universities on the basis of a mapping between KM eandb's and KM processes. This comparative country level study, embracing a number of universities, offers insights into national policy, and cultural expectations that influence the extent and nature of barriers and enablers to effective KM. The insights offered by this study will be valuable for Mauritius and South Africa, and also for universities in other countries.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 72 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 June 2019

Leslier M. Valenzuela-Fernández, Francisco-Javier Arroyo-Cañada and Francisco Javier Villegas Pinuer

Salesperson’s actions are critical in helping the firm develop customer value orientation and long-term relationship with profitable customers to achieve sustainable sales…

Abstract

Purpose

Salesperson’s actions are critical in helping the firm develop customer value orientation and long-term relationship with profitable customers to achieve sustainable sales growth and profitability over time. The purpose of this paper is to examine the salespeople and service executives’ perceptions about the relevance of some human resource management variables and employees’ attitudes as key factors to develop a company’s customer value orientation. The authors tested whether the perceptions of role ambiguity, incentives policy and provided training (PT) had an impact on job involvement (JI), job satisfaction (JS), and consequently, on customer value orientation.

Design/methodology/approach

Research design was nested with data from 327 executives from medium and upper positions in Chilean companies.

Findings

The results show that while the perception of role ambiguity had an indirect negative impact on customer value orientation through JI, perception of PT level had a direct impact over and above the other variables.

Research limitations/implications

JS and JI are attitudinal variables, which companies try to encourage in their employees through different human resources, practices. Incentives and training are ways to develop favorable employees’ attitudes and improve their customer value orientation. With the research, companies could invest their resources in better and more effective practices to generate favorable attitudes toward customer value orientation.

Originality/value

Through structural equation modeling, the model shows the relevance in the perception of sales executives about the relationship of employees’ JI and customer value orientation. This commands to open the view of the customer value orientation management to include other attitudinal variables as JI.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 49 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 May 2018

Nicholas R. Prince, J. Bruce Prince and Rüediger Kabst

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of national culture on the adoption of four different incentive pay bundles (incentive maximizer, contingent…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of national culture on the adoption of four different incentive pay bundles (incentive maximizer, contingent rewarder, profit rewarder, and incentive minimizer) using GLOBE national culture dimensions in 14 countries. It uses incentive pay bundles derived by Prince et al. (2016).

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted multilevel random-intercept logistic modeling using firm incentive practice usage from the CRANET database and country culture scores from the GLOBE study.

Findings

Evidence suggests that in-group collectivism is associated with increased use of the incentive maximizer approach, in which firms use a combination of high levels of individual, team, and profit sharing incentives, and decreased use of the incentive minimizer approach (where firms minimally employ incentives) and the individual and team bonus focused contingent rewarder configuration. Higher uncertainty avoidance is linked to increased use of the profit rewarder approach (where only profit sharing is emphasized) and decreased use of the contingent rewarder approach. Performance-orientation cultures appear to support using the incentive maximizer and avoiding the incentive minimizer bundles.

Originality/value

This study investigates incentive practice bundles that firms use verses separate analysis of practices and use the GLOBE culture metrics. It utilizes multilevel modeling, which has been lacking in past studies of culture and incentives.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 August 2020

Yuk Ling Angie Lee, Ashish Malik, Philip J. Rosenberger III and Piyush Sharma

This paper aims to investigate the differences in the mediating roles of trust and knowledge sharing (formal vs informal) in the process by which training and incentives

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the differences in the mediating roles of trust and knowledge sharing (formal vs informal) in the process by which training and incentives influence organizational performance (sales increase and labor productivity).

Design/methodology/approach

The data from an online survey of Senior Managers from 119 firms in Hong Kong’s clothing industry (HKCI) was analyzed using SmartPLS software.

Findings

Trust has a stronger mediating impact in the effects of incentives (vs training) on both formal and informal knowledge sharing. Informal (vs formal) knowledge sharing has a stronger mediating impact in the effects of trust on sales increase and labor productivity.

Research limitations/implications

Future research may consider different dimensions such as knowledge donating and collecting behaviors, as well as motives, such as self-enjoyment, reciprocity or social interaction ties to study knowledge sharing behavior.

Practical implications

This study shows that incentives are more likely than training to help build a trusting environment in an organization and that informal knowledge sharing has a stronger influence on organizational performance than formal knowledge sharing.

Originality/value

The study’s distinctive contribution is the under-researched context of HKCI for investigating the mediating effects of trust and formal and informal knowledge sharing between ability and motivational practices on performance.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 24 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Peter Mühlemeyer

Based on an empirical study, proposes requirements for and measuresof the formation of internal incentive systems as instruments forinternal innovation management. Uses…

Abstract

Based on an empirical study, proposes requirements for and measures of the formation of internal incentive systems as instruments for internal innovation management. Uses the knowledge of experience of individuals taking an active part in innovation for the formulation of such proposals. The necessity for the implementation of integrated incentive systems, which allow for material fundamental demands beyond those peculiar to individual career expectations, becomes obvious.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 June 2017

Erik Poutsma, Paul E. M. Ligthart and Ulke Veersma

Taking an international comparative approach, this chapter investigates the variance in the adoption of employee share ownership and stock option arrangements across…

Abstract

Taking an international comparative approach, this chapter investigates the variance in the adoption of employee share ownership and stock option arrangements across countries. In particular, we investigate the influence of multinational enterprises (MNEs), industrial relations factors, HRM strategies, and market economies on the adoption and spread of the arrangements across countries. We find that industrial relations factors do not explain the variance in adoption by companies in their respective countries. MNEs and HRM strategies are important drivers of adoption. Market economy does not moderate the influence of MNEs on adoption, suggesting that MNEs universally apply the arrangements across borders.

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2019

Manas Ranjan Behera, Chardsumon Prutipinyo, Nithat Sirichotiratana and Chukiat Viwatwongkasem

Retention of medical doctors and nurses in remote and rural areas is a key issue in India. The purpose of this paper is to assess the relevant policies and provisions with…

Abstract

Purpose

Retention of medical doctors and nurses in remote and rural areas is a key issue in India. The purpose of this paper is to assess the relevant policies and provisions with respect to health care professionals, aiming to develop feasible retention strategies in rural areas of Odisha state of India.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed documentary review and key informant interviews with policy elites (health planners, policy maker, researchers, etc.). The document review included published and unpublished reports, policy notifications and articles on human resources for health (HRH) in Odisha and similar settings. Throughout the study, the authors adapted World Health Organization’s framework to study policies relevant to HRH retention in rural areas. The adapted framework comprised of the four policy domains, education, regulation, financial incentives, professional and personal support, and 16 recommendations.

Findings

In Odisha, the district quota system for admission is not practiced; however, students from special tribal and caste (Scheduled Tribe and Scheduled Caste) communities, Socially and Educationally Backward Classes of citizens, and Persons with Disabilities have some allocated quota to study medicine and nursing. Medical education has a provision of community placement in rural hospitals. In government jobs, the newly recruited medical doctors serve a minimum of three years in rural areas. Doctors are given with location-based incentives to work in remote and difficult areas. The government has career development, deployment, and promotion avenues for doctors and nurses; however, these provisions are not implemented effectively.

Originality/value

The government could address the rural retention problems, as illustrated in the study and put in place the most effective policies and provisions toward recruitment, deployment and attraction of HRH in remote and rural areas. At the same time, implementation HRH strategies and activities must be rigorously monitored and evaluated effectively.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

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