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Article

Torrence E Sparkman

The purpose of this paper is to understand the factors and conditions that influence national human resource development (NHRD) in Brazil. In this paper, the transitioning…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the factors and conditions that influence national human resource development (NHRD) in Brazil. In this paper, the transitioning nature of the political, economic, social and educational conditions; the current challenges and trends that may impact NHRD; and the current status of NHRD research in Brazil are examined.

Design/methodology/approach

A search of the research literature focused on the political, economic, cultural, social and educational environment and the research associated with NHRD in Brazil was conducted. After searching several databases, including Academic Search Complete, Google Scholar, ERIC and EBSCO, several articles were selected and analyzed based on the depth of description of the conditions and research.

Findings

Among the factors discovered, race, gender and educational equality are still concerns. The complex nature of the relationship between the Brazilian Government, its people and organizations, as well as the efforts of Brazil’s multinational and indigenous organizations to address their national development needs, are also presented.

Originality/value

Brazil is currently and projected to be a long-term player in the global economy; however, it struggles to cope with conditions incongruent to the country’s long-term success. This paper frames the conditions and suggests ways of moving forward through human resource development practice, policy and research in Brazil.

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Article

Lisa Eisele, Therese Grohnert, Simon Beausaert and Mien Segers

This article aims to understand conditions under which personal development plans (PDPs) can effectively be implemented for professional learning. Both the organization's…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to understand conditions under which personal development plans (PDPs) can effectively be implemented for professional learning. Both the organization's manner of supporting the PDP practice as well as the individual employee's motivation is taken into account.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was distributed among employees of a Dutch governmental office, measuring perceived effectiveness of the tool (undertaking learning activities and performance), perceptions of PDP practices in the organization, and individual motivation. Regression analysis revealed that learning and reflection practices in the organization are positively related to number of learning activities undertaken by employees and to perceived performance.

Findings

A significant moderating effect of motivation was found, supporting the idea that the tool's perceived effectiveness depends both on the organization's efforts as well as the individual's motivation.

Research limitations/implications

In this study, the authors were limited by a low response rate, a single setting, as well as a lack of causal evidence due to the cross‐sectional set‐up. They therefore encourage the validation of their hypotheses in different settings, and in an experimental/longitudinal manner.

Practical implications

Implications for practice include the importance for organizations to implement PDPs in an on‐going cycle of learning, combined with opportunities for formal and informal learning, while supervisors carry great responsibility for providing feedback and encouragement based on the employee's motivation for learning.

Originality/value

This combination of company practices with individual supporting conditions such as employees' motivation to understand when PDPs work best is a novel approach to understanding PDP effectiveness and hopes to add to both theoretical and practical understanding.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

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Article

Diane Rose Keeble-Ramsay and Andrew Armitage

The paper aims to report initial empirical research that examines UK employees’ perceptions of the changing nature of work since the Global Financial Crisis (GFC) to…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to report initial empirical research that examines UK employees’ perceptions of the changing nature of work since the Global Financial Crisis (GFC) to consider how the financial context may have constrained HRD practice and more sustainable approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

Focus group research was facilitated through collective group discussion. Through template analysis of the findings, thematic analysis was undertaken to extend prior research. Themes used by Hassard et al. (2009) in terms of the changing nature of the workplace between 2000 and 2008, were used to provide new data on HRD realities.

Findings

Participants reported diminishing personal control over changes within the workplace and a cultural shift towards a harsher work climate. HRD was considered as silenced or absent and associated solely with low cost-based e-learning rather than acting in strategic role supporting sustainable business objectives.

Research limitations/implications

Whilst providing only indications from employee perceptions, the research identifies a weakened HRD function. The key contribution of this paper lies with empirical evidence of post-GFC constraints placed upon HRD strategies. It further identifies whether alternative development approaches, mediated by organisational learning capabilities, might emancipate UK HRD.

Social implications

This paper engenders a debate around the status of HRD within the UK organisations, further to the global financial crisis (GFC), where HRD might be viewed as at a juncture to argue a need for a shift from a financialised mode for people management towards one of greater people focus.

Originality/value

This research provides initial findings of the impact of the economic climate. It considers new approaches which might resolve expiring HRD through more sustainable practices.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

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Article

Raimonda Alonderienė

The paper aims to analyze the relationship between managers' informal learning and their job satisfaction in Lithuanian small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs).

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to analyze the relationship between managers' informal learning and their job satisfaction in Lithuanian small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology of the survey has been developed in respect to the ideas on informal learning and job satisfaction. The questionnaire on informal learning factors was developed by the author. Also, the adapted Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire was used. A representative sample of 173 SMEs managers in Lithuania was surveyed.

Findings

The paper reveals the relationship between managers' informal learning and their job satisfaction in Lithuanian SMEs. Informal learning factors not only correlate with but also have an impact on job satisfaction. The survey findings correspond to similar surveys carried out in other countries.

Research limitations/implications

The research could be replicated in large organizations as well as in other countries to confirm or deny the relations established in this survey.

Practical implications

Understanding and managing informal learning factors can help improve job satisfaction in Lithuanian SMEs.

Originality/value

The clarified concept of informal learning is presented. Also, the systematized set of informal learning factors is introduced and tested empirically.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

Keywords

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Article

Erica Falkenström, Jon Ohlsson and Anna T Höglund

The purpose of this paper was to explore what kind of ethical competence healthcare managers need in handling conflicts of interest (COI). The aim is also to highlight…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to explore what kind of ethical competence healthcare managers need in handling conflicts of interest (COI). The aim is also to highlight essential learning processes to develop healthcare managers’ ethical competence.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study was performed. Semi-structured interviews with ten Swedish healthcare managers from different care providers were carried out twice and analysed through step-wise categorisation.

Findings

Four categories of COI were revealed and two ways (passive and active) in which COI were handled. Ethical guidelines did not help the healthcare managers to handle the COI, and none of the managers made use of any sort of systematic ethical analysis. However, certain ethical competence was of great importance to identify and handle COI, consisting of contextual understanding, rational emotions, some theoretical knowledge and a suitable language. Organising work so that ethical analysis can be carried out is of great importance, and top management needs to clearly express the importance of ethical competence and allocate resources to allow adequate learning processes.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the management level and focuses on how work-integrated learning-processes can enable ethical competence. Ethical competence at the management level is essential both to comply with the constitution and legal requirements regarding healthcare, and so that managers are able to analyse COI and justify their decisions.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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Article

Roland Harnesk and Lena Abrahamsson

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the discussion of organisation and management by uncovering some embedded contradictions in total quality management (TQM).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the discussion of organisation and management by uncovering some embedded contradictions in total quality management (TQM).

Design/methodology/approach

Based on discussions of leadership, TQM and the demands of modern working life, three examples of embedded contradictions that organisations can be confronted with have been discussed: collectivism versus individualism, manipulation versus empowerment and standardization versus innovative learning.

Findings

One conclusion from this paper is that organisations, in a matter of complex navigation, need to find balance between these contradictions, something that can be a significant problem for many leaders and often seems to be handled in an instrumental manner.

Originality/value

Although these contradictions are a growing concern in TQM research, they are seldom discussed in management literature, and therefore need to be addressed.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

Keywords

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Article

Per‐Erik Ellström

The purpose of this paper is to explore the idea of practice‐based innovation and to propose a framework that can be used to conceptualize and analyze practice‐based…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the idea of practice‐based innovation and to propose a framework that can be used to conceptualize and analyze practice‐based innovation processes in organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The argument is driven by conceptual analysis and theoretical synthesis based on theory and research on innovation, organizational change, individual and organizational learning.

Findings

The proposed framework portrays practice‐based innovation as a cyclical process of adaptive and developmental learning driven by contradictions and tensions between explicit and implicit dimensions of work processes.

Originality/value

The paper adds to previous research through its focus on practice‐based innovation and the conceptualization of this notion in terms of learning in and through everyday work. It thus creates connections between innovation research and research on workplace learning.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 22 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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Article

Lennart Svensson, Per‐Erik Ellström and Carina Åberg

A model for workplace learning is presented, which intends to integrate formal and informal learning with the use of e‐learning. An important underlying assumption is that…

Abstract

A model for workplace learning is presented, which intends to integrate formal and informal learning with the use of e‐learning. An important underlying assumption is that the integration of formal and informal learning is necessary in order to create desirable competencies, from both an individual and an organisational perspective. Two case studies are presented in which the model was tested. One of the studies was carried out in an industrial setting, the other in a hospital context. The results are promising in terms of flexibility and accessibility, but some problems remain to be solved. These problems have to do with the integration of individual and organisational learning, but also with the lack of time for reflection and learning during conditions of down‐sizing and rationalisation.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 16 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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Article

Pernille Bottrup

The aim of this article is to examine network‐based learning and discuss how participation in network can enhance organisational learning.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this article is to examine network‐based learning and discuss how participation in network can enhance organisational learning.

Design/methodology/approach

In recent years, companies have increased their collaboration with other organisations, suppliers, customers, etc., in order to meet challenges from a globalised market. They form and participate in a variety of different networks in order to improve innovation, organisational learning and effectiveness. These networks can be considered as one context for learning parallel to training institutions and workplaces. In this paper characteristics of and preconditions for network‐based learning are analysed and compared with school‐based learning and workplace learning. The analysis draws on experiences from an action research project aiming at improving the occupational health and safety work within 11 Danish enterprises forming a network.

Findings

Network learning might hold potential for forming an important supplement to school‐based learning and workplace learning. Some of the difficulties related to these two learning arenas can be reduced in a network setting, and in that way network‐based learning can help building bridges between the two “traditional” learning arenas.

Originality/value

Examines network‐based learning and discusses how participation in network can enhance organisational learning.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 17 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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Article

Satu Maarit Parjanen, Minna Saunila, Anne Kallio and Vesa Harmaakorpi

The purpose of this paper is to define the factors of innovativeness in the context of employee involvement and study how these factors could be affected by an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to define the factors of innovativeness in the context of employee involvement and study how these factors could be affected by an employee-driven innovation (EDI) process.

Design/methodology/approach

This study follows a quantitative approach through a survey. The survey data were collected from a case organisation, where employees designed an innovation manual in a participatory process to support their daily innovativeness.

Findings

According to the results, the EDI manual process can assist the organisation in developing their ideation and organising structures. The employees felt that their ideas were appreciated more after the innovation manual process. Understanding about innovation and innovativeness was also increased. In between two survey rounds, the focus of the most urgent development targets had shifted from internal idea management practices towards customer ideas, cooperation and appreciation of different ideas. This indicates that the internal innovation system has to work before it is reasonable to involve other stakeholders.

Originality/value

The study presents an empirical example of an employee-driven process in the context of public sector healthcare. It increases understanding about the importance of employee involvement in the innovation manual development process and how this process affects the factors of innovativeness.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

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