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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Qi Sun and Haijun Kang

The globalization of the market economy and the technology revolution present multiple demands for education to meet the needs of the knowledge society. In this global…

Abstract

Purpose

The globalization of the market economy and the technology revolution present multiple demands for education to meet the needs of the knowledge society. In this global context, work-based learning (WBL) has become increasingly valuable and critical for individuals and governments to enhance employability and to produce competitive workforces. Yet, the interdependence nature of globalization urges us to learn from each other the various theoretical and methodological approaches to WBL. Applying an appreciative inquiry, the purpose of this paper is to propose the transformation of current WBL practices by integrating or “meshing” Confucian Learning Model (CLM) into Western approaches for sustainable human development in this multi-cultural economic-driven global context.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is grounded in literature review and critical examination of profound pedagogical theories and practices from both Western and Eastern perspectives. Western education philosophies, learning theories, and models are critically examined and contrasted with CLM an important Eastern perspective in order to identify the major limitations of current WBL development. Appreciative inquiry and comparative view are applied as methods to highlight the significance of integrating or meshing CLM into the Western approaches to transform current WBL practices in this global context.

Findings

WBL has greatly benefited current workforce development worldwide, which is well documented in the literature. However, through futuristic and holistic human development perspectives, current WBL development is seen as moving toward pragmatism and utilitarianism due to overemphasizing the use of education for economic competition and for satisfying employers’ immediate work/job needs. Through an “appreciative eye” and comparative lens, this paper helps identify an urgent need to integrate or mesh CLM, an important Eastern perspective, into Western perspectives for enhanced theoretical foundations and more holistic and systemic practical approaches to transform current WBL practices for global sustainable human development.

Originality/value

This paper employs a unique method of “appreciative eye” and comparative lens through which scholars and practitioners may identify what is missing but needed in current WBL development in the global context. It is through this unique approach that this paper increases the reader’s awareness of the limitations of current WBL practices, guides them to envision how to fully prepare and release the potential of the twenty-first century workforce, and calls for integrating or “meshing” CLM into the various Western approaches for a more holistic perspective for the possible transformation of current WBL practices worldwide.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2011

Álvaro López‐Cabrales, Juan C. Real and Ramón Valle

This paper has three purposes: first, to study whether organizational learning capability (OLC) is related to human resource management (HRM) practices such as selection…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper has three purposes: first, to study whether organizational learning capability (OLC) is related to human resource management (HRM) practices such as selection, development, appraisals and rewards; second, to assess to what extent the value and uniqueness of human capital is associated with OLC; and lastly, to consider the possible mediating role of human capital in the relationships between HRM practices and OLC.

Design/methodology/approach

This research was conducted with a sample of companies in the most innovative sectors of Spanish industry, applying the partial least squares (PLS) technique.

Findings

The results in this paper demonstrate the direct association of selection and appraisals practices and both dimensions of human capital with learning. Furthermore, developmental practices are associated with the value of human capital, and the selection and appraisal practices are related to uniqueness. Therefore, human capital is partially mediating the relationships between HRM practices and OLC.

Research limitations/implications

The principal limitation of the paper comes from the cross‐sectional nature of the research, especially the dynamic character of the OLC and the absence of causality test, which requires the necessity of a longitudinal study design.

Practical implications

The results of this paper suggest first that a firm focused on learning needs to incorporate HRM practices such as potential‐based selection and appraisals. Second, it is also necessary to take into consideration that learning is associated with a firm's human capital of greater value and/or uniqueness. Third, the management of the value and uniqueness of human capital requires different HRM practices in each case. This will allow managers to apply appropriate HRM practices according to the type of human capital that is needed.

Originality/value

The results in the paper suggest a relationship between human capital and the value and uniqueness of employees' knowledge and this human capital is associated to HRM practices. A final contribution of this paper is the assumption of human capital as a mediating variable in the relationship between HRM practices and OLC.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2007

Alex Bennet and David Bennet

This article seeks to introduce the concept of spiritual learning by exploring the value of human characteristics spiritual in nature with respect to their relationship to

Abstract

Purpose

This article seeks to introduce the concept of spiritual learning by exploring the value of human characteristics spiritual in nature with respect to their relationship to learning.

Design/methodology/approach

In developing this theme, the authors engage a systematic approach: defining terms; identifying representative human characteristics that are spiritual in nature; surfacing assumptions; and identifying emerging themes among the representative spiritual characteristics with respect to learning.

Findings

There appears to be a positive correlation between the representative spiritual characteristics and human learning. For better or worse, the material universe and non‐material universe are married in the conscious and unconscious learning of the human mind.

Originality/value

This work provides a new frame of reference for understanding the relationship between spirituality and learning.

Details

VINE, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Andrew L. Cooper, Joseph R Huscroft, Robert E. Overstreet and Benjamin T Hazen

Knowledge management capabilities have proven to be key success factors for organizations within our increasingly information-based economy. Although knowledge management…

Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge management capabilities have proven to be key success factors for organizations within our increasingly information-based economy. Although knowledge management literature has a rich history, less is known about how an organization’s learning culture affects outcomes realized via knowledge management initiatives. Moreover, there is a dearth of understanding regarding how to successfully operationalize knowledge management activities in order to achieve performance in the dynamic logistics and supply chain management environment. Rooted in competence-based theory, the purpose of this paper is to examine the role that learning culture plays with regard to knowledge management capabilities, human capital, and organizational performance at logistics service providers.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses survey data from 448 managers and covariance based structural equation modeling to assess how knowledge management, learning culture, and human capital influence organizational performance.

Findings

The results of this study indicate that knowledge management has a significant positive relationship with learning culture and human capital. There was also an indirect effect of knowledge management through learning culture on human capital and organizational performance. Interestingly, human capital did not have a significant relationship with organizational performance as hypothesized.

Practical implications

The results support the vital role that leaders and managers have in creating a culture that is conducive to the success of knowledge management initiatives.

Originality/value

This study goes beyond the simple direct relationship between knowledge management and personal and organizational outcomes that is usually examined by testing learning culture as an important mediator.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 116 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Article
Publication date: 2 December 2019

Zhiyang Wang and Yongsheng Ou

This paper aims to deal with the trade-off of the stability and the accuracy in learning human control strategy from demonstrations. With the stability conditions and the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to deal with the trade-off of the stability and the accuracy in learning human control strategy from demonstrations. With the stability conditions and the estimated stability region, this paper aims to conveniently get rid of the unstable controller or controller with relatively small stability region. With this evaluation, the learning human strategy controller becomes much more robust to perturbations.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the criterion to verify the stability and a method to estimate the domain of attraction are provided for the learning controllers trained with support vector machines (SVMs). Conditions are formulated based on the discrete-time system Lyapunov theory to ensure that a closed-form of the learning control system is strongly stable under perturbations (SSUP). Then a Chebychev point based approach is proposed to estimate its domain of attraction.

Findings

Some of such learning controllers have been implemented in the vertical balance control of a dynamically stable, statically unstable wheel mobile robot.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2010

Tara Fenwick

The purpose of this paper is to compare theoretical conceptions that reclaim and re‐think material practice – “the thing” in the social and personal mix – specifically in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare theoretical conceptions that reclaim and re‐think material practice – “the thing” in the social and personal mix – specifically in terms of work activity and what is construed to be learning in that activity.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is theory‐based. Three perspectives have been selected for discussion: cultural‐historical activity theory (CHAT), actor‐network theory (ANT), and complexity theory. A comparative approach is used to examine these three conceptual framings in the context of their uptake in learning research to explore their diverse contributions and limitations on questions of agency, power, difference, and the presence of the “thing”.

Findings

The three perspectives bear some similarities in their conceptualization of knowledge and capabilities as emerging – simultaneously with identities, policies, practices and environment – in webs of interconnections between heterogeneous things, human and nonhuman. Yet each illuminates very different facets of the sociomaterial in work‐learning that can afford important understandings: about how subjectivities are produced in work, how knowledge circulates and sediments into formations of power, and how practices are configured and re‐configured. Each also signals, in different ways, what generative possibilities may exist for counter‐configurations and alternative identities in spaces and places of work.

Originality/value

While some dialogue has occurred among ANT and CHAT, this has not been developed to compare more broadly the metaphysics and approaches of these perspectives, along with complexity theory which is receiving growing attention in organizational research contexts. The paper purports to introduce the nature of these debates to work‐learning researchers and point to their implications for opening useful questions and methods for inquiry in workplace learning.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 22 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 30 January 2007

Essi Saru

The purpose of this paper is to study human resource development (HRD) and organisational learning issues in a small expert organisation.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study human resource development (HRD) and organisational learning issues in a small expert organisation.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a qualitative single case study conducted in one Finnish SME. It is part of an ongoing study. It is descriptive in nature and the aim is to find out whether the existing HRD and OL practices are relevant and appropriate in the small context.

Findings

The results reveal that small organisations do consider HRD to be an issue, even though it may not be as visible or official as in larger companies. The HRD, OL or strategy issues merge into the territory of just one man. The case organisation represents the small firm sector very well.

Research limitations/implications

Current literature has established that the models designed for larger organisations are not directly applicable to the small context. Future research should concentrate on finding out what model SMEs use for the development of human resources. This study cannot be generalised because, at this point, it is a single case study.

Practical implications

From the SME perspective, the paper suggests that there is a lot a small organisation can do in terms of human resource practices, even without vast resources.

Originality/value

The paper examines the HRD and OL issue from a practical point of view.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 June 2019

Robert E. Overstreet, Joseph B. Skipper, Joseph R. Huscroft, Matt J. Cherry and Andrew L. Cooper

The purpose of this study is to empirically evaluate the relationship between learning culture, workforce level, human capital and operational performance in two diverse…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to empirically evaluate the relationship between learning culture, workforce level, human capital and operational performance in two diverse supply chain populations, aircraft maintenance and logistics readiness.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing upon competence-based view of the firm and human capital theory, this paper analyzes data from two studies.

Findings

The results provide support for the hypothesized model. Workforce level moderates the relationship between learning culture and human capital, and human capital partially mediates the relationship between learning culture and operational performance.

Research limitations/implications

The findings have implications for behavioral supply chain management research and implications for educating and training the supply chain management workforce. While the populations represent a diverse set of logistics functions and responsibilities, the participants are all military members, which may limit generalizability.

Practical implications

This study should help leaders understand the importance of learning culture and the perceived differences in its effect on human capital based upon workforce level.

Originality/value

This research is among the first to investigate the role of workforce level and answers a multitude of calls for research into the human side of supply chain management.

Details

Journal of Defense Analytics and Logistics, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2399-6439

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2001

Magdalena Mo Ching Mok and Yin Cheong Cheng

Aims to develop a theoretical model for understanding and enhancing effective self‐learning in a networked human and information technology (IT) environment. Recent…

Abstract

Aims to develop a theoretical model for understanding and enhancing effective self‐learning in a networked human and information technology (IT) environment. Recent educational reforms in different parts of the world emphasize that independent self‐learning throughout the life span is a sine qua non of education. Parallel to this is the development that the Internet and information technology have changed the modes of teaching and learning fundamentally and created unlimited opportunities for learning. There is an urgent need to develop a theory or model that can be used to deepen the understanding of the nature and process of self‐learning and facilitate students becoming highly motivated and effective self‐learners with the support of a networked human and IT environment. The implications drawn from the theory can contribute to the paradigm shift of education in current worldwide education reforms.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Luyi Li, Yanlin Zheng, Hiroaki Ogata and Yoneo Yano

The impact of Ubiquitous Computing on Learning is not confined within technical dimension. Besides its technical facilitation, this new computing paradigm also challenges…

Abstract

The impact of Ubiquitous Computing on Learning is not confined within technical dimension. Besides its technical facilitation, this new computing paradigm also challenges human’s belief on learning, and compels us to rethink on the design of learning resources and environments. The paper explores the concept of Ubiquitous Learning, and proposes a conceptual framework for a Ubiquitous Learning Environment (ULE) design and implementation. A ULE is established on the combination between Real World and Virtual Space, Personal Space and Shared Space. Learning in a ULE is conducted in the interactions among three essential communicative elements: Social Human, Object in real world, and Artifact in virtual space. A learning process is a social transfer process between tacit and explicit knowledge. Context‐Awareness is indispensable to all kinds of interactions in a ULE. In particular, this paper gives a discussion to context‐awareness supported Interoperability and Adaptability in a ULE, and suggests a five‐dimensional (Who, What, How, When, Where) representation approach for modeling context and providing context‐awareness information. In the practical dimension, this paper presents a design framework for a ULE implementation by integrating the applications of present affordable learning devices, such as networked PCs (Personal Computer), PDAs (Personal Digital Assistant), mobile phones, sensors, and RFIDs. A basic learning system architecture in a ULE and a prototype ubiquitous language learning system are also addressed in this paper.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

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