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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2021

Stephanie Douglas, Daisha Merritt, Robin Roberts and Daryl Watkins

This study aims to examine the impact of leadership development programs on organizational outcomes and organizational effectiveness.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the impact of leadership development programs on organizational outcomes and organizational effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a grounded theory approach, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 executive leaders from aviation firms in Brazil with employees participating in a leadership development program. NVivo12 was used for coding and managing the data. Thematic analysis was performed to determine themes and categories.

Findings

The leadership development program was found to influence organizational level outcomes identified as themes of internal impact, external impact, skill development and capacity. The interviews also found that executive leaders perceived the leadership development program to impact organizational effectiveness. Connections to human capital, social capital and collective leadership were found as outcomes of the leadership development program contributing to organizational effectiveness.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are dependent upon the executive leaders’ interviews and are limited sample size. The protocol of subjective inter-coder reliability was followed supporting the credibility and dependability of the findings; however, researcher bias may still be present in qualitative studies. Generalizability outside of the Brazilian aviation context is cautioned until further studies in additional contexts and industries are completed.

Practical implications

The findings of this study support leadership development programs as impactful on organizational outcomes and effectiveness. Incorporating leadership development programs as part of human capital management strategies supports organizational effectiveness through increased collective leadership capacity, human capital development and social capital.

Originality/value

A large amount is known regarding the outcomes for individuals as a result of leadership development programs with less examination on the contribution to organizational level outcomes and organizational effectiveness. This study aids in bridging this gap.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2021

Md Shamirul Islam and Muslim Amin

The review aims to demonstrate a broader perspective of human capital and employee well-being concept. Moreover, the study attempts to analyse theoretical notions…

Abstract

Purpose

The review aims to demonstrate a broader perspective of human capital and employee well-being concept. Moreover, the study attempts to analyse theoretical notions underlying human capital and well-being relationship and thus to guide the integration of two distinct concepts.

Design/methodology/approach

This review followed the systematic literature search protocols from the Academic Journal Guide 2018 generated by the Chartered Association of Business Schools. Sixty-nine quantitative research papers were selected for the review.

Findings

Human capital is not only about individual competence but includes acquisition, utilization and development of competence in a broader sense. Employee well-being has been discussed from subjective and objective viewpoints and categorized into happiness, health and financial aspects. The review results suggest that various organizational theories, workplace learning and learning organization perspectives underlie human capital and well-being relationship. The review guides that the high involvement working model encapsulates well-being as part of human capital development.

Research limitations/implications

This review discusses practical implications for human resource management practitioners.

Originality/value

This review is a unique attempt to assess the human capital and well-being literature systematically.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2021

Muhammad Ali, Syed Ali Ali Raza, Chin-Hong Puah and Shamim Samdani

This research aims to explain the effect of financial indicators and economic growth on human capital in low-income countries.

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to explain the effect of financial indicators and economic growth on human capital in low-income countries.

Design/methodology/approach

We gathered balanced panel data from 1980 to 2016 over a sample of 12 low-income countries categorized by World Development Indicators. The data stationary properties were analyzed by unit root test while the existence of a long-run relationship among the variables was confirmed by cointegration test. We performed Hausman test to differentiate between the fixed effect and random effect model. The sensitivity analysis confirmed the robustness of the results.

Findings

Our findings indicated that broad money supply and private sector credit has a positive and significant impact on human capital. Interestingly, bank credit showed a negative and significant effect on human capital. We also found a significant positive relationship between human capital and economic growth in the study sample.

Originality/value

This is a preliminary study using financial development and human capital in low-income countries with panel econometric techniques as an analysis tool. Overall, we suggest a policy to focus on the financial sector development and economic growth to produce sustainable human capital.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 48 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Book part
Publication date: 26 July 2014

Eduardo Fayos-Solà, Laura Fuentes Moraleda and Ana Isabel Muñoz Mazón

Previously disregarded factors are now included in development theory and practice. A narrow understanding of capital has had profound effects on development as well as on…

Abstract

Previously disregarded factors are now included in development theory and practice. A narrow understanding of capital has had profound effects on development as well as on tourism policy and governance. In this framework, purpose-designed tourism for development has been the exception. Contemporary ideas of other forms of capital playing a key role in a broader concept of development are examined, specifically the central function of human and social-institutional capital. Human capital is seen in the light of capabilities, attributes, and knowledge possessed by individuals. Social-institutional capital may empower individuals as it refers to the value of trust and cooperation deriving from formal and informal sets of behavioral rules. This chapter clarifies the foundations of tourism as an instrument for development if tourism policy and governance are designed and implemented within an adequate framework.

Details

Tourism as an Instrument for Development: A Theoretical and Practical Study
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-680-6

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2020

Aaqib Sarwar, Muhammad Asif Khan, Zahid Sarwar and Wajid Khan

This paper aims to investigate the critical aspect of financial development, human capital and their interactive term on economic growth from the perspective of emerging economies.

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1991

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the critical aspect of financial development, human capital and their interactive term on economic growth from the perspective of emerging economies.

Design/methodology/approach

Data set ranged from 2002 to 2017 of 83 emerging countries used in this research and collected from world development indicators of the World Bank. The two-step system generalized method of moments is used to conduct this research within the endogenous growth model while controlling time and country-specific effects.

Findings

The findings of the study indicate that financial development has a positive and significant effect on economic growth. In emerging countries, human capital also has a positive impact on economic growth. Financial development and human capital interactively affect economic growth for emerging economies positively and significantly.

Research limitations/implications

The data set is limited to 83 emerging countries of the world. The time period for the study is 2002 to 2017.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the existing literature on human capital, financial development and economic growth. Limited research has been conducted on the impact of financial development and human capital on economic growth.

Details

Asian Journal of Economics and Banking, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2615-9821

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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2019

Benon Muhumuza and Sudi Nangoli

The purpose of this paper is to revisit the potential of human capital development to predict commitment from an empirical perspective. This followed the fact that while…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to revisit the potential of human capital development to predict commitment from an empirical perspective. This followed the fact that while organisations continue to invest a lot of resources into development of their human capital, a growing tendency of the trained staff to quickly abandon the organisation and move on to search for greener pastures has also been registered.

Design/methodology/approach

This study takes a positivistic approach. It is an explanatory, cross-sectional study that is based on a case study approach.

Findings

The findings revealed that developing human resources still leads to enhanced commitment among staff. The findings provide empirical support for the tenets of the human capital development theory.

Research limitations/implications

Investment in development of human resources is still a worthy while cause for organisations as it positively and significantly contributes to commitment.

Practical implications

While organisations ought to keep watch of the costs that come with human capital development endeavours the practice of developing human resources should be continued as it contributes to the organisational performance of staff.

Originality/value

The paper deepens the understanding on how human capital development is currently enhancing the commitment of organisational staff in a typical developing economy and sector. Such knowledge provides a clear basis for allocating resources on people development endeavours.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 51 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2010

Naveed Iqbal Chaudhry and Muhammad Azam Roomi

The purpose of this paper is to examine empirically the impact of human capital development in organizations. It is based on some conceptual aspects of human resource…

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4602

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine empirically the impact of human capital development in organizations. It is based on some conceptual aspects of human resource accounting and considers how investments in the development of human capital can be measured in order to investigate the financial returns for organizations.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is exploratory in nature as this is the first of its kind in the Pakistani manufacturing sector. The technique of convenience sampling was used to collect the data due to time and resource limitations. The sample comprises of 30 leading companies in the Pakistani textile sector. A self‐administered postal questionnaire was designed for the research survey. The results focus on the benefits derived by using the capital investment appraisal techniques of human resource accounting including: return on investment, benefit to cost ratio, weighted average cost of capital, and bottom line evaluations.

Findings

The results provide evidence of an association between investment in the development of human capital and the benefits, which organizations can reap from such investments. It further finds that the organizations investing in training and development programs provide high employee productivity that ultimately contributes towards high‐organizational performance.

Research limitations/implications

Owing to the research design, the results may exhibit a lack of generalizability to other sectors. As the results cannot be applied to other organizations, further research can be done by using the same techniques.

Originality/value

This paper is a groundbreaking work in Pakistan and thereby an addition to the existing global literature on human resource accounting. This research provides new directions for the literature in this area, by encouraging a debate about the importance of investing in the development of human capital.

Details

Journal of Human Resource Costing & Accounting, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1401-338X

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Madhu Sehrawat and A.K. Giri

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between financial development indicators and human capital for Asian countries using the annual data from 1984-2013.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between financial development indicators and human capital for Asian countries using the annual data from 1984-2013.

Design/methodology/approach

The stationarity of the variables are checked by Levin-Lin-Chu, Im-Pesaran-Shin, Fisher-type augmented Dickey-Fuller and Philips-Perron panel unit-root tests. The Pedroni’s and Kao’s panel co-integration approaches are employed to examine the long-run relationship among the variables. To estimate the coefficients of co-integrating vectors, both panel dynamic ordinary least squares (PDOLS) and fully modified ordinary least squares (FMOLS) techniques are used. The short-term and long-run causality is examined by panel granger causality.

Findings

The Pedroni’s and Kao’s co-integration approaches support the existence of the long-run relationship among the indicators of financial development, economic growth and human capital. The PDOLS and FMOLS estimators revealed that both financial development indicators and economic growth variable act as an important driver for the increase in human capital. The results of panel granger causality indicate that causality runs from indicators of financial development, economic growth and public spending on education to human capital.

Originality/value

There is hardly any study that examine the impact of financial development indicators and economic growth on human capital in Asian economies, therefore the present study fill the research gap in the literature.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 44 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Peter Davis

This paper seeks to critically review developments in the literature spanning personnel management, HRM, learning organization and intellectual capital approaches to…

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5687

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to critically review developments in the literature spanning personnel management, HRM, learning organization and intellectual capital approaches to employee utilization and development. The purpose being to identify the benefits, limitations and lessons for the management of people in the co‐operative and mutual sectors.

Design/methodology/approach

The problem of inadequate Personnel or HRM systems in the majority of co‐operatives has been established by the author over a period of seven years, field work with co‐operative organizations including the international co‐operative alliance (ICA), asian confederation of credit unions (ACCU), and the British society for co‐operative studies. Direct interviews and a sample of HRM and Membership Relations audit forms developed as part of the ongoing field research and special project work have been applied to various co‐operative contexts in all the regions of the ICA.

Findings

The findings are that co‐operatives generally are lagging behind the private sector in their application of all four approaches. Mostly smaller co‐operatives lack effective basic personnel systems and few of the larger co‐operatives go beyond HRM. This failure to develop clear programs for the utilization and development of their people is a missed opportunity.

Practical implications

The membership base and its roots in a community of shared interests means that, whilst co‐operatives have lessons to learn from all four approaches, they can and must go beyond them if they are to optimize their people‐centered business advantage in the marketplace.

Originality/value

The paper suggests a new strategy for co‐operatives of Co‐operative Social Capital Management to help them compete, whilst retaining their co‐operative difference.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

Faruk Abdullah

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the human capital theory from an Islamic perspective. It studies the primary sources of Islam to discover its contribution towards…

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2281

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the human capital theory from an Islamic perspective. It studies the primary sources of Islam to discover its contribution towards human capital development.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts inductive and analytical method to interpret Islamic viewpoints towards human capital development. It studies the classical and modern sources of Islamic law and analyzes scholars' opinions.

Findings

In fact, human capital theory has a different understanding in Islam, due to its different objectives. However, it resembles the conventional theory in the way that it urges the development of human beings in education, skills and abilities. Islamic teachings contribute a lot to foster development among the individuals in every aspect of their lives. The way Islam gives incentive to development is unique; because, with the improvement of education, good skills, work and production, physical health and perfection, it is concerned about the moral and ethical development of employees, which is no doubt having a great effect in the development of the organization. Moreover, Islamic society plays an important role in nurturing enthusiastic and competent individuals.

Originality/value

It is expected that the paper would be of interest to Muslim authorities, as a means to motivate their employees, as well as to share ideas across the academic disciplines.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

Keywords

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