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Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2015

Toni Eagar and Andrew Lindridge

The academic discourse around celebrity and iconicity has resulted in the same human brand as labeled as an inauthentic and illegitimate celebrity and as a culturally…

Abstract

Purpose

The academic discourse around celebrity and iconicity has resulted in the same human brand as labeled as an inauthentic and illegitimate celebrity and as a culturally important symbol of legitimate achievement. We address the research question of how are contradictions between celebrity and iconicity resolved in creating and managing a human brand.

Methodology/approach

Using structuration theory, we analyzed David Bowie’s 50 year career, from 1964 to 2013, totaling 562 documents. Applying Langley’s (1999) stages of data collection of grounding, organizing, and replicating, we develop a process of model of celebrity and iconicity.

Findings

We identify three stages of human brand symbolic associations: forming, fixing, and transitioning associations. These represent alternate trajectories that Bowie and Ziggy Stardust followed to become icons. In resolving his trajectories across these stages, Bowie adapts and adopts commercial materials, business practices, and new technologies to converge his symbolic associations into a coherent iconic human brand.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of this paper lie in focusing on one human brand in a particular industry. Future research is suggested in three areas: (1) the relationship between the proposed model and other human brand activities; (2) to explore how the process is manipulated by other market agents; and (3) whether a human brand’s association shifts can precede culture.

Originality/value

This perspective challenges existing conceptualizations of celebrity and iconicity by framing them as inter-related processes, where celebrity associations are fixed in time, while iconic associations transition across time periods to reflect changing cultural values and concerns.

Details

Consumer Culture Theory
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-323-5

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Andreas Diedrich and Gustavo Guzman

This paper aims to examine the complexities emerging in the attempts to develop a sophisticated IT-based knowledge management system (KMS) for sharing knowledge. Using…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the complexities emerging in the attempts to develop a sophisticated IT-based knowledge management system (KMS) for sharing knowledge. Using actor-network theory, the authors conceptualise this as continuous processes of translation, whereby heterogeneous human and non-human (e.g. technologies, methods and plans) elements are drawn together and mobilised to produce stable networks through associations between them.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study method was adopted using a narrative approach that studies the ways of organising work in organisations. Shadowing, field notes, diary studies and participant observation were the main data collection methods used.

Findings

The development and introduction of a KMS is a contingent and local process shaped by messy translations whereby the original idea, human and other non-human elements are reconfigured. By considering humans and non-humans symmetrically, the intended and unintended actions, and the role of unexpected events, this approach overcomes the deterministic view of human nature of the conventional KMS approaches.

Research limitations/implications

A conceptual framework is presented as a means to improve the understanding of the complex associations emerging within networks of people, objects and machines during the development and introduction of KMS.

Practical implications

The translation approach helps practitioners to consider their taken-for-granted assumptions about people, machines and the associations among them. This assists practitioners to uncover emerging conflicting issues between human and machines, among machines and among humans. Furthermore, this allows practitioners to recognise the different identities humans and non-humans take, overtime, as a result of emerging associations.

Originality/value

The originality of this paper lies in the use of alternative conceptual lenses to understand KMS development and introduction as processes of translation. Additionally, rather than exploring the success stories, it focuses on a failed attempt to introduce a KMS.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Anthony Hussenot

To understand how collaborative work practices emerge and evolve throughout activities, the purpose of this paper is to comprehend the making of compromises from a process…

Abstract

Purpose

To understand how collaborative work practices emerge and evolve throughout activities, the purpose of this paper is to comprehend the making of compromises from a process view. Compromises are here understood as constantly evolving throughout activities.

Design/methodology/approach

The author relies on the Actor-Network Theory to define two dynamics participating in the making of compromises: the translation and the association. These two dynamics are then illustrated with a case study about the development of a Human Resource Management device that took place in a bank in Luxembourg. From this case, the author focuses on the emergence of various compromises about the project’s purpose.

Findings

Based on the insights brought by the theoretical framework and case studies, compromise is understood as a temporary result of the translations and associations between humans and non-humans. Compromise is also anything that is shared by actors (meaning, categories, objectives, etc). that enables them to make their collective activity possible. This process view of compromises makes three contributions: it fully recognizes that compromise is not stable but situated in practices, it highlights the mediating role of compromises and it insists on the interrelation between compromises throughout the activity.

Originality/value

The matter of compromise has mainly been studied from a moral standpoint as a stable agreement, whatever the context. This article also provides an alternative approach to understanding compromise as situated in practices.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Vincent Obedgiu

The purpose of the paper is to trace the historical perspectives in the development and evolution of human resource management as a field of study and profession.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to trace the historical perspectives in the development and evolution of human resource management as a field of study and profession.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a desk research to conduct a general review of literatures that are fundamental in tracing the historical routes, evolution, and professional development in the field of human resource management.

Findings

The literature reviewed reveals that human resource management is a product of the human relations movement of the early twentieth century, when researchers began documenting ways of creating business value through the strategic management of the workforce. The function was initially dominated by transactional work such as payroll and benefits administration, but due to globalization, company consolidation, technological advancement, and further research, human resource now focuses on strategic initiatives like mergers and acquisitions, talent management, succession planning, industrial and labor relations, and diversity and inclusion. In start-up companies, human resource’s duties are performed either by a handful of trained professionals or even by non-human resource personnel. In larger companies, an entire functional group is typically dedicated to the discipline, with staff specializing in various human resource tasks and functional leadership engaging in strategic decision making across the business. To train practitioners for the profession, institutions of higher education, professional associations, and companies themselves have created programs of study dedicated explicitly to the duties of the function. Academic and practitioner organizations likewise seek to engage and further the field of human resource, as evidenced by several field-specific publications.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the body of knowledge in human resource management and practices, professional development, history of human resource management and the future of human resource functions. Further attempt is made in the study to present historical perspective of the evolution of the field to prepare professional managers in managing the human resource function and disseminate the human resource development philosophy and values to improve human resource practice and recognition within the management agenda.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 36 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Luc Hens

Describes the main structural lines of the Brussels master′s programmein human ecology. Delineates its relationships with the EuropeanCertificate of Human Ecology and the…

Abstract

Describes the main structural lines of the Brussels master′s programme in human ecology. Delineates its relationships with the European Certificate of Human Ecology and the European Association of Human Ecology. In this way describes two complementary networking structures on human ecology (HE) in Europe. This overview of networking structures is complemented by an enumeration of national and international HE organizations in Europe. Discusses the possible involvement of the Society for Human Ecology in two rather recent international developments in the field: the growing number of academic initiatives in East European countries; and the evaluation by international panels of experts of interdisciplinary research products as state of the environment studies which otherwise escape the test of international scientific validation.

Details

Environmental Management and Health, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-6163

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2018

Thanti Mthanti and Kalu Ojah

The purpose of this paper is to establish a more robust empirical support for the long established postulation by Adam Smith and Joseph Schumpeter that human capital and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish a more robust empirical support for the long established postulation by Adam Smith and Joseph Schumpeter that human capital and institutions enable Schumpeterian entrepreneurship, which, in turn, facilitates economic growth.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting entrepreneurial orientation (EO) (i.e. innovativeness, proactiveness and risk taking; Mthanti and Ojah, 2017, Research Policy, 46:4, pp. 724-739) as the measure of Schumpeterian entrepreneurship at the macro-level, and using a sample of 93 countries, over 1980-2008, the authors employ system Generalised Method of Moments to investigate institutions and human capital as possible determinants of Schumpeterian entrepreneurship (EO).

Findings

The authors find that the human capital-EO nexus is robust across economic development levels. However, there is a cross-country variation in the institutions-EO nexus. In line with theoretical predictions, institutions indeed drive EO in middle-to-high-income countries. However, in low-income countries, building institutions in order to foster EO yields perverse outcomes, which, for us and especially based on deeper analysis, suggest that improving the quality of institutions may not be a necessary precondition for EO/growth policy in low-income countries. Furthermore, the authors find that EO is a highly persistent series, with self-reinforcing network effects, i.e. lofty EO behaviour encourages more lofty EO behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

Drivers of macro EO are erroneously taken as of growth. This empirical analysis corrects the sequencing.

Practical implications

Policy practice must acknowledge macro-EO importantly has both direct and indirect growth effects.

Originality/value

This study is the first to empirically test the theoretical sequence between drivers of growth/EO and economic growth.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship and Public Policy, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-2101

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2010

Amany Elbanna

Technology acceptance model (TAM) has been described as one of the most influential theories in information systems (IS), but new studies have suggested that the…

Abstract

Purpose

Technology acceptance model (TAM) has been described as one of the most influential theories in information systems (IS), but new studies have suggested that the simplicity of this theory, which helped predict users' acceptance, has actually hindered research progress on the complex issues involved and called researchers to go beyond TAM to open the black box of systems use. The purpose of this paper is to argue that TAM studies implicitly assume a linear straightforward relationship between intentions to adopt and use IS and actual use. It aims to explore this relationship and investigate the possible existence of factors that could moderate the impact of initial intentions on actual IS use.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper follows the interpretive research tradition. It investigates a case of an e‐procurement system that was initially accepted for its usefulness and ease of use. The system was later rejected and not put in any significant use when it went live.

Findings

Data analysis reveals the complex ramification of systems configuration and business process change that could affect system use – reversing its initial acceptance and positive intention to use.

Originality/value

The paper provides insight into system acceptance and use in mandatory and workplace contexts. It demonstrates that the move from the initial acceptance to actual use is more problematic than TAM suggests. It provides a novel conceptualisation of business processes as holders of social and technical networks that constitute actors' performing power.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Book part
Publication date: 17 June 2020

Vilma Seeberg

The human development and capability approach (HDCA) and its associated participatory method is receiving growing attention as a useful conceptual development for…

Abstract

The human development and capability approach (HDCA) and its associated participatory method is receiving growing attention as a useful conceptual development for comparative international education. HDCA challenges the economism so prevalent in world development thinking and, instead, looks at development as a process of enhancing persons’ incrementally achieved substantive freedoms from deprivations. The centrality of the person replaces the centrality of income growth.

The application of HDCA to the study of the role of education that promotes social justice change is illustrated by using an empowerment-capability framework to the long-term study of the benefits of village schooling for rural girls in western China.

Using HDCA to identify influences on social change, we derive a much more nuanced and valuable multi-dimensional view of human development, which enables us to draw broad implications for more effective policy. National policies should use a multi-dimensional informational base including equality, sustainability, and non-market dimensions of well-being as well as market production.

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Book part
Publication date: 28 August 2019

Abstract

Details

Race Discrimination and Management of Ethnic Diversity and Migration at Work
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-594-8

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2010

Ananda Samudhram, G. Sivalingam and Bala Shanmugam

The purpose of this paper is to discuss a framework of accounting theoretical bases that could promote research into little understood areas of human capital accounting.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss a framework of accounting theoretical bases that could promote research into little understood areas of human capital accounting.

Design/methodology/approach

The possible forces that hinder greater disclosure of human capital‐based information are analyzed by reviewing several theoretical viewpoints that offer a framework of different possible reasons for the low frequency of human capital‐based disclosures.

Findings

The paper explores several possible reasons for the reluctance of firms to disclose greater amounts of human capital‐based information, from the perspective of relevant theoretical bases. The predominant reasons may differ in different circumstances, industries and environments.

Research limitations/implications

The paper explores theoretical bases that explain the barriers to widespread reporting of human capital‐based information. The theoretical bases discussed are not empirically validated.

Practical implications

The validation of the theoretical bases explored in this study, and the possible uncovering of new bases in the future through empirical studies, will enable academics, policy makers and accounting standard setters to better understand the reasons for the limited disclosures of human capital‐based information by listed firms to capital markets. This will help in the promulgation of widely accepted accounting standards for the disclosure of human capital‐based information, which address and overcome the forces that currently hinder the reporting of human capital‐based information.

Originality/value

This is the first paper that explores a framework of several pertinent theoretical viewpoints that specifically address the non‐disclosures of human capital‐based information to capital markets.

Details

Journal of Human Resource Costing & Accounting, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1401-338X

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