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1 – 10 of over 161000
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2008

Nadia Corp, Anna Tsaroucha and Paul Kingston

This paper reviews the current evidence base for human givens therapy in the context of mental health. A systematic literature search was conducted from which it is…

Abstract

This paper reviews the current evidence base for human givens therapy in the context of mental health. A systematic literature search was conducted from which it is concluded that the evidence base for human givens therapy is currently limited: most evidence proffered is expert opinion supported with brief case studies or anecdotal evidence, with the exception of two descriptive studies both concerning trauma and the rewind technique. This paper calls for further research to be undertaken to examine the effectiveness of human givens therapy and for mainstream mental health, counselling and psychotherapy journals to provide space for healthy debate.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2008

Julian Warner

Information science has been conceptualized as a partly unreflexive response to developments in information and computer technology, and, most powerfully, as part of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Information science has been conceptualized as a partly unreflexive response to developments in information and computer technology, and, most powerfully, as part of the gestalt of the computer. The computer was viewed as an historical accident in the original formulation of the gestalt. An alternative, and timely, approach to understanding, and then dissolving, the gestalt would be to address the motivating technology directly, fully recognizing it as a radical human construction. This paper aims to address the issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts a social epistemological perspective and is concerned with collective, rather than primarily individual, ways of knowing.

Findings

Information technology tends to be received as objectively given, autonomously developing, and causing but not itself caused, by the language of discussions in information science. It has also been characterized as artificial, in the sense of unnatural, and sometimes as threatening. Attitudes to technology are implied, rather than explicit, and can appear weak when articulated, corresponding to collective repression.

Research limitations/implications

Receiving technology as objectively given has an analogy with the Platonist view of mathematical propositions as discovered, in its exclusion of human activity, opening up the possibility of a comparable critique which insists on human agency.

Originality/value

Apprehensions of information technology have been raised to consciousness, exposing their limitations.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 64 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 6 May 2021

Magnus Söderlund and Eeva-Liisa Oikarinen

Firms have begun to introduce virtual agents (VAs) in service encounters, both in online and offline environments. Such VAs typically resemble human frontline employees in…

2891

Abstract

Purpose

Firms have begun to introduce virtual agents (VAs) in service encounters, both in online and offline environments. Such VAs typically resemble human frontline employees in several ways (e.g. the VAs may have a gender and a name), which indicates the presence of an assumption by VA designers – and by firms that employ them – that VA humanness is a positively charged characteristic. This study aims to address this assumption by examining antecedents to perceived humanness in terms of attribution of agency, emotionality and morality, and the impact of perceived humanness on customer satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was distributed online to participants who had been interacting with existing VAs, and they were asked to focus on one of them for this study. The questionnaire comprised measures of antecedents to perceived humanness of VAs, perceived humanness per se and customer satisfaction. A structural equation modeling approach was used to assess associations between the variables.

Findings

Attributions of agency, emotionality and morality to VAs contributed positively to the perceived humanness of the VAs, and perceived humanness was positively associated with customer satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

Additional humanness capabilities should be explored in further research.

Practical implications

Firms using VAs in service encounters should make attempts to maximize perceived VA humanness, and this study shows that it may be beneficial if such attempts comprise signals that VAs have agency, emotionality and morality.

Originality/value

By examining VAs in terms of a set of fundamental human capabilities, the present study contributes to existing research on human–VA service encounters, which to date has focused on more superficial VA characteristics (such as if the VA has a face and gender).

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 55 no. 13
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 21 June 2021

Magnus Söderlund

This study aims to examine humans’ reactions to service robots’ display of warmth in robot-to-robot interactions – a setting in which humans’ impressions of a service…

1570

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine humans’ reactions to service robots’ display of warmth in robot-to-robot interactions – a setting in which humans’ impressions of a service robot will not only be based on what this robot does in relation to humans, but also on what it does to other robots.

Design/methodology/approach

Service robot display of warmth was manipulated in an experimental setting in such a way that a service robot A expressed low versus high levels of warmth in relation to another service robot B.

Findings

The results indicate that a high level of warmth expressed by robot A vis-à-vis robot B boosted humans’ overall evaluations of A, and that this influence was mediated by the perceived humanness and the perceived happiness of A.

Originality/value

Numerous studies have examined humans’ reactions when they interact with a service robot or other synthetic agents that provide service. Future service encounters, however, will comprise also multi-robot systems, which means that there will be many opportunities for humans to be exposed to robot-to-robot interactions. Yet, this setting has hitherto rarely been examined in the service literature.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 35 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 November 2019

Zhenbin Jiang, Juan Guo and Xinyu Zhang

A common pipeline of apparel design and simulation is adjusting 2D apparel patterns, putting them onto a virtual human model and performing 3D physically based simulation…

Abstract

Purpose

A common pipeline of apparel design and simulation is adjusting 2D apparel patterns, putting them onto a virtual human model and performing 3D physically based simulation. However, manually adjusting 2D apparel patterns and performing simulations require repetitive adjustments and trials in order to achieve satisfactory results. To support future made-to-fit apparel design and manufacturing, efficient tools for fast custom design purposes are desired. The purpose of this paper is to propose a method to automatically adjust 2D apparel patterns and rapidly generate acustom apparel style for a given human model.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors first pre-define a set of constraints using feature points, feature lines and ease allowance for existing apparels and human models. The authors formulate the apparel fitting to a human model, as a process of optimization using these predefined constraints. Then, the authors iteratively solve the problem by minimizing the total fitting metric.

Findings

The authors observed that through reusing existing apparel styles, the process of designing apparels can be greatly simplified. The authors used a new fitting function to measure the geometric fitting of corresponding feature points/lines between apparels and a human model. Then, the optimized 2D patterns are automatically obtained by minimizing the matching function. The authors’ experiments show that the authors’ approach can increase the reusability of existing apparel styles and improve apparel design efficiency.

Research limitations/implications

There are some limitations. First, in order to achieve interactive performance, the authors’ current 3D simulation does not detect collision within or between adjacent apparel surfaces. Second, the authors’ did not consider multiple layer apparels. It is non-trivial to define ease allowance between multiple layers.

Originality/value

The authors use a set of constraints such as ease allowance, feature points, feature lines, etc. for existing apparels and human models. The authors define a few new fitting functions using these pre-specified constraints. During physics-driven simulation, the authors iteratively minimize these fitting functions.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Anna Tsaroucha, Paul Kingston, Tony Stewart, Ian Walton and Nadia Corp

This paper aims to present the findings of research commissioned by a Primary Care Trust in the UK to assess the implementation of a new pilot Human Givens mental health…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the findings of research commissioned by a Primary Care Trust in the UK to assess the implementation of a new pilot Human Givens mental health service (HGS) within primary care.

Design/methodology/approach

Participating General Practitioners practices were designated as either “Human givens” or “Control” practices. The study focused on service users with mild to moderate depressed mood measured using HADS. The well-being of these participants was examined at the point of referral, and after four, eight and 12 months using three well-being questionnaires.

Findings

The results revealed that emotional well-being significantly improved during the first four months following referral for both groups and this improvement was maintained up to and including one year post referral. Compared to the Control group Human givens therapy was found to be of shorter duration, lasting one or two sessions compared to standard treatment which lasted on average four sessions.

Originality/value

Apart from the psychological insight and emotional support, it is suggested that Human givens therapy might help the client to better function in society and maintain a sense of social integration. This has benefits to other providers of social care.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1992

Richard L. Brinkman

Essays a conceptural clarification and theory of the process of economicevolution. Using the Veblenian matrix, conceptualizes the economicprocess in the framework of…

Abstract

Essays a conceptural clarification and theory of the process of economic evolution. Using the Veblenian matrix, conceptualizes the economic process in the framework of culture and its evolution. Economic evolution, as a gestalt, comprises the processes of both economic growth (quantitative statics) and development (qualitative dynamics). The dynamics of culture evolution is founded on the advance of technology which constitutes the “core of culture”. The essence of the process of culture evolution is contained in the dichotomy of useful knowledge. The advance of useful knowledge appears in its application as technology and in its store as culture. The process of economic evolution increases the capacity of culture and thereby enables humankind to take bigger and bigger bites of the infinity of knowledge. Culture evolution, fed by the dynamics of the economic process, offers the potential for an enhanced “consciousness of the cosmos” and as such a conception of human progress.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 19 no. 10/11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 May 2008

Maiju Johanna Perälä

This paper aims to investigate whether empirical evidence for scale economies can be found across countries and if so, whether this evidence varies across the stage of development.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate whether empirical evidence for scale economies can be found across countries and if so, whether this evidence varies across the stage of development.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses statistical methods to make comparisons between countries.

Findings

The empirical results suggest overall evidence towards aggregate increasing returns across all samples. Within the Cobb‐Douglas framework, stronger evidence for aggregate increasing returns is found among samples depicting economies in the early stages of development. The CES framework in turn supports aggregate scale economies for advanced economies, while unitary elasticity of substitution cannot be rejected for less developed economies, giving further support for the Cobb‐Douglas estimates.

Research limitations/implications

Given that evidence for scale economies is found within different estimation frameworks for different groups of economies, comparative judgment is prevented. The results nevertheless provide evidence on the overall relevance of scale economies within and across groups of economies, while also giving a clear indication of the relevance of stage of development in economic growth and development analysis.

Originality/value

The most fundamental insight of the empirical results presented in this paper is that there is no reason to assume that the determinants of growth or the parameters guiding economies' adjustments towards their steady states or growth paths will be similar for economies at different stages of development, given their significant structural differences, whether in terms of production structures and characteristics or consumption patterns.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2020

Camille Pluntz and Bernard Pras

Building strong human brands inscribed in social and symbolic recognition is a strategic issue for branded individuals. In the context of film director human brands, this…

Abstract

Purpose

Building strong human brands inscribed in social and symbolic recognition is a strategic issue for branded individuals. In the context of film director human brands, this study aims to examine the respective influences of the economic and critical performance of films, on the one hand, and the professional legitimacy bestowed by internal stakeholders, on the other, on changes in human brand identity. Contrary to what is generally believed, it shows that the specific legitimacy bestowed by producers and the institutional legitimacy bestowed by elite peers mediate the effects of performance on changes in human brand identity. Brand extension (i.e. new films) incongruence and initial human brand identity moderate the effect of performance on legitimacy.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is applied to film director human brands and to their extensions through the films they make. Data were collected for 81 films, including information before and after the brand extension occurs, to capture changes in human brand identity and extension effects.

Findings

The results show that economic performance influences both specific and institutional legitimacy, whereas critical performance only impacts institutional legitimacy. These relationships are moderated by initial human brand identity and congruence. Both types of professional legitimacies also help reinforce human brand identity.

Originality/value

The study challenges the role of performance on the building of human brand identity and shows that the latter is co-constructed by the branded individual and internal stakeholders. It also enhances the key roles of global incongruence and genre incongruence in the model.

Article
Publication date: 21 March 2016

Nurul Aisyah Sim Abdullah, Nor Laila Mohd Noor and Emma Nuraihan Mior Ibrahim

The purpose of this study is to investigate the contributing factors to E-government disruptions in Malaysia public service. Researchers have highlighted that the main…

1276

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the contributing factors to E-government disruptions in Malaysia public service. Researchers have highlighted that the main factors that contribute to IT service failure are the people, process and technology. However, relatively few empirical studies examine to what extent these factors contribute to E-government service disruptions. This study explores the level of contribution of each factor to the E-government service disruptions.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was conducted based on the hypothetical-deductive approach. Based on the synthesized literature review, a conceptual model is proposed and several hypotheses are developed. The study was undertaken using questionnaires via convenience sampling whereby eight frontline agencies, six departments and four ministries in Malaysian public service were selected. The selected agencies are frontline agencies (agencies that deal directly with citizens) and have implemented E-government. The respondents consist of IT department employees of those agencies. The data for this research were analyzed using the descriptive and inferential statistics analysis.

Findings

Statistically, both human error and process failure are significantly correlated with E-government service disruptions in the Malaysian public sector. More importantly for this research, the empirical results reveal that human action, decision, management, error and failure are the major causes to the E-government disruptions, followed by an improper process or procedures. In addition, it is found that technology failure is not significantly contributing to the E-government disruption frequency in the Malaysian public sector. Human error is an important factor and needs to be given more attention by the management, as human is the creator, who uses, manages and maintains the technology and process to enable the delivery of services as specified in the objectives, vision and mission of the organization. However, the approach used to address E-government disruptions is more toward technology-oriented and revolves around the recovery process.

Research limitations/implications

The study only focuses on three main factors, which are people, process and technology, and the target sample focuses only front-end service agencies. Further study can be extended by incorporating the other factor such as organizational environment, and the sample size could be expanded by including all agencies in public services. As human failure is a major cause of E-government disruptions, the proposed future research should also study the causes of human failure and how to address the problem by developing a resilient organization.

Practical implications

The results of this study have two implications: first is the discovery of the disruption factors that affect E-government service availability, and second is that the results of this study prioritized the factors that contribute to E-government service disruptions. This information would be beneficial to local, state and national governments for further action to ensure the availability and sustainability of E-government implementation.

Originality/value

This study identifies the factors that contribute to the service disruption of E-government and, thus, gives the priority of each factor based on its contribution to the E-government service disruption. This is an important finding because it enables public sector agencies to plan and implement improvements as needed and at the appropriate rate for each IT service component to ensure the E-government availability guarantee.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Keywords

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