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Article

Nianxin Wang, Huigang Liang, Shilun Ge, Yajiong Xue and Jing Ma

The purpose of this paper is to understand what inhibit or facilitate cloud computing (CC) assimilation.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand what inhibit or facilitate cloud computing (CC) assimilation.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors investigate the effects of two enablers, top management support (TMS) and government support (GS), and two inhibitors, organization inertia (OI) and data security risk (DSR) on CC assimilation. The authors posit that enablers and inhibitors influence CC assimilation separately and interactively. The research model is empirically tested by using the field survey data from 376 Chinese firms.

Findings

Both TMS and GS positively and DSR negatively influence CC assimilation. OI negatively moderates the TMS–assimilation link, and DSR negatively moderates the GS–assimilation link.

Research limitations/implications

The results indicate that enablers and inhibitors influence CC assimilation in both separate and joint manners, suggesting that CC assimilation is a much more complex process and demands new knowledge to be learned.

Practical implications

For these firms with a high level of OI, only TMS is not enough, and top managers should find other effective way to successfully implement structural and behavioral change in the process of CC assimilation. For policy makers, they should actively play their supportive roles in CC assimilation.

Originality/value

A new framework is developed to identify key drivers of CC assimilation along two bipolar dimensions including enabling vs inhibiting and internal vs external.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article

Nianxin Wang, Yajiong Xue, Huigang Liang, Zhining Wang and Shilun Ge

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the government roles in cloud computing assimilation along two dimensions: government regulation and government support.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the government roles in cloud computing assimilation along two dimensions: government regulation and government support.

Design/methodology/approach

A research model was developed to depict the dual roles of government regulation and government support in cloud computing assimilation as well as the mediating effect of top management support (TMS). Using survey data collected from 376 Chinese firms that have already adopted cloud services, the authors tested the research model.

Findings

The impacts of both government regulation and government support on cloud computing assimilation are partially mediated by TMS. Government support exerts stronger impacts on TMS than government regulation.

Research limitations/implications

This study extends the current information systems literature by highlighting the specific mechanisms through which governments influence firms’ assimilation of cloud computing.

Practical implications

Governments in developing countries could actively allocate funds or enact policies to effectively encourage cloud computing assimilation.

Originality/value

This study would complement previous findings about government regulation, and develop a more holistic understanding about the dual roles of governments in information technology innovation assimilation.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article

Chenhui Liu, Huigang Liang, Nengmin Wang and Yajiong Xue

Employees’ information security policy (ISP) compliance exerts a significant strain on information security management. Drawing upon the compliance theory and control…

Abstract

Purpose

Employees’ information security policy (ISP) compliance exerts a significant strain on information security management. Drawing upon the compliance theory and control theory, this study attempts to examine the moderating roles of organizational commitment and gender in the relationships between reward/punishment expectancy and employees' ISP compliance.

Design/methodology/approach

Using survey data collected from 310 employees in Chinese organizations that have formally adopted information security policies, the authors applied the partial least square method to test hypotheses.

Findings

Punishment expectancy positively affects ISP compliance, but reward expectancy has no significant impact on ISP compliance. Compared with committed employees, both reward expectancy and punishment expectancy have stronger impacts on low-commitment employees' ISP compliance. As for gender differences, punishment expectancy exerts a stronger effect on females' ISP compliance than it does on males.

Originality/value

By investigating the moderating roles of organizational commitment and gender, this paper offers a deeper understanding of reward and punishment in the context of ISP compliance. The findings reveal that efforts in building organizational commitment will reduce the reliance on reward and punishment, and further controls rather than the carrot and stick should be applied to ensure male employees' ISP compliance.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article

Yajiong Xue, Yuanyuan Dong, Mengyun Luo, Dandan Mo, Wei Dong, Zhiruo Zhang and Huigang Liang

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how WeChat addiction influences users’ physical, mental, and social health.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how WeChat addiction influences users’ physical, mental, and social health.

Design/methodology/approach

A national survey was conducted in China. A total of 1,058 responses were collected from 31 regions of China.

Findings

The regression results show that WeChat addiction is negatively associated with users’ physical, mental, and social health. The negative effects are significant even after adjusting for the effects of the Big Five personality traits, years of using WeChat, and demographic variables such as age, gender, education level, and monthly income. Years of using WeChat is not significantly related to users’ health. It is also found that the influence of WeChat addiction on health outcomes is sensitive to years of WeChat use. The influence is dormant when users have less than three years of WeChat usage, but starts to exhibit itself after three years.

Research limitations/implications

Addictive use of WeChat is associated with declining overall health among Chinese users. Given the cross-sectional nature of this study, definite causal relationship between WeChat addiction and health deterioration cannot be established. Controlled experiments are needed to further examine the causal effects of WeChat addiction.

Originality/value

WeChat is the most popular mobile social network service (SNS) in China, but its comprehensive impact on users’ health is rarely studied. This paper extends the extant research on SNS addiction by providing a deepened understanding of how mobile SNS addiction affects personal health in the unique context of WeChat, which provides an important contribution to the interdisciplinary research in public health, psychology, and information systems.

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Article

Rixiao Cui, Juanru Wang, Yajiong Xue and Huigang Liang

Although interorganizational learning has attracted substantial attention, research about its effects on green innovation is still rare. Combining theories of…

Abstract

Purpose

Although interorganizational learning has attracted substantial attention, research about its effects on green innovation is still rare. Combining theories of organizational learning and absorptive capacity, this study explores the relationships among interorganizational learning, green knowledge integration capability (GKIC) and green innovation (GI), and analyzes the moderating role of green absorptive capacity (GAC). Based on resource-based and ambidexterity theories, this study focuses on vertical exploitative (VEL) and lateral explorative learning (LEL). This study expands the research of GI by proposing two different interorganizational learning mechanisms and uncovering the intricate relationship between them and GI.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a sample of 203 Chinese manufacturing firms, the authors used a hierarchical regression analysis and bootstrap method to test the theoretical framework and research hypotheses of this paper.

Findings

Results show that VEL and LEL have positive effects on GI. GKIC partially mediates the relationship between VEL and GI and completely mediates the relationship between LEL and GI. Moreover, GAC plays a moderating role between LEL and GKIC and moderates the effect of LEL on GI via GKIC, such that the effect is stronger when GAC increases. However, it does not moderate the relationship between VEL and GKIC.

Originality/value

First, founded on resource-based and ambidexterity theories, this study considers two dimensions of interorganizational learning, VEL and LEL. Second, by testing the mediating role of GKIC, the authors provide a theoretical lens to understand the relationship between interorganizational learning and GI. Third, by examining boundary conditions of GAC, the authors enrich organizational learning and absorptive capacity theory in the context of green development.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article

Yajiong Xue, John Bradley and Huigang Liang

The purpose of this research is to investigate the impact of team climate and empowering leadership on team members' knowledge‐sharing behavior.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to investigate the impact of team climate and empowering leadership on team members' knowledge‐sharing behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

A research model was developed based on prior knowledge management studies. Survey data were collected from 434 college students at a major US university, who took courses that required team projects. The partial least squares technique was applied to test the research model.

Findings

Team climate and empowering leadership significantly influence individuals' knowledge‐sharing behavior by affecting their attitude toward knowledge sharing. These two constructs also have significant direct effects on the knowledge‐sharing behavior.

Research limitations/implications

The student sample and US setting might limit the generalizability of the findings. Nonetheless, this study is based on and extends prior research, which provides a deepened understanding of knowledge sharing in the team context.

Practical implications

This research has practical implications for how to design teams to facilitate knowledge sharing. It suggests that cohesive, innovative teams with members trusting one another and led by empowering leaders will have a higher level of knowledge sharing.

Originality/value

This research originally examines the effects of both team climate and empowering leadership on knowledge sharing. Little prior research has carried out such an integrated analysis. This paper will have significant value for organizations trying to redesign teams to enhance knowledge management.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article

Zhining Wang, Nianxin Wang and Huigang Liang

– The aim of this paper is to investigate the impact of knowledge sharing (KS) on firm performance and the mediating role of intellectual capital (IC).

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to investigate the impact of knowledge sharing (KS) on firm performance and the mediating role of intellectual capital (IC).

Design/methodology/approach

A research model was developed based on prior KS and IC studies. A survey was administered to a sample of high technology firms in China and 228 usable responses were collected. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was employed to test the research model.

Findings

Tacit KS significantly was found to contribute to all three components of IC, namely human, structural and relational capital, while explicit KS only has a significant influence on human and structural capital. Human, structural and relational capital, enhance both operational and financial performance of firms. The effect of KS on firm performance is mediated by IC. Explicit KS has a greater effect on financial performance than operational performance, whereas tacit KS has a greater impact on operational performance than financial performance.

Research limitations/implications

The sample of high technology firms in China might limit the generalization of the findings. Nonetheless, this study takes its lead from and extends prior research, thus providing a deepened understanding of the role of KS in organizational settings.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that managers can enhance firm performance by enhancing their KS and IC. Managers can develop corresponding strategies based on the findings to achieve their specific performance goals.

Originality/value

This is one of the first papers to examine how KS contributes to firm performance through the mediation of IC. It will add significant value for organizations trying to enhance their performance though KS practices.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 52 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Book part

Abdelkebir Sahid, Yassine Maleh and Mustapha Belaissaoui

This chapter presents an analysis illustrating the evolution of information systems’ development based on three interdependent phases. In the first period, information…

Abstract

This chapter presents an analysis illustrating the evolution of information systems’ development based on three interdependent phases. In the first period, information systems were mainly considered as a strictly technical discipline. Information technology (IT) was used to automate manual processes; each application was treated as a separate entity with the overall objective of leveraging IT to increase productivity and efficiency, primarily in an organizational context. Secondly, the introduction of networking capabilities and personal computers (instead of fictitious terminals) has laid the foundations for a new and broader use of information technologies while paving the way for a transition from technology to its actual use. During the second phase, typical applications were intended to support professional work, while many systems became highly integrated. The most significant change introduced during the third era was the World Wide Web, which transcended the boundaries of the Internet and the conventional limits of IT use. Since then, applications have become an integral part of business strategies while creating new opportunities for alliances and collaborations. Across organizational and national boundaries, this step saw a transformation of IT in the background. These new ready-to-use applications are designed to help end-users in their daily activities. The end-user experience has become an essential design factor.

Details

Strategic Information System Agility: From Theory to Practices
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-811-8

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Article

Jing Yang, Rathindra Sarathy and Stephen M. Walsh

To explore the psychological mechanism through which consumer reviews affect people’s purchasing decisions and behavior, this study aims to examine the impact of…

Abstract

Purpose

To explore the psychological mechanism through which consumer reviews affect people’s purchasing decisions and behavior, this study aims to examine the impact of statistical evidence embedded in product reviews on consumers’ perceptions and purchasing intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

The effects review valence and review volume are tested using a 3 (valence: positive vs neutral vs negative) × 2 (volume: high vs low) quasi-experimental design and online questionnaires.

Findings

The study finds that review valence has a stronger impact on consumers’ perceptions than review volume does. Negative reviews induce higher risk perception and a less favorable attitude toward purchases compared to positive reviews. In addition, although both attitude toward purchase and subjective norm are good antecedents of purchase intention, the attitude statistically has a stronger impact than the subjective norm.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to extant literature from three perspectives. The authors have reexamined the findings of econometric models and advanced their implications by explaining the related psychological changes in people’s perceptions. Second, the authors have extended the application of the theory of reasoned action and found it to be a good fit in explaining consumers’ behavior related to consumer reviews. And finally, the authors have provided a clear guideline on the magnitude of the effects of review valence and volume on consumers’ perceptions.

Originality/value

This study provides a good complement to econometric studies from both theoretical and practical perspectives. It bridges the gap between exploratory studies and behavioral studies in the field of consumer reviews.

Details

Nankai Business Review International, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8749

Keywords

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Article

Thomas Mayr and Andreas H. Zins

The purpose of this paper is to test and compare different conceptual approaches for perceived value in a service context.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test and compare different conceptual approaches for perceived value in a service context.

Design/methodology/approach

Perceived value is an outcome construct that results from various benefits received and sacrifices devoted to achieve a particular exchange of a service. The paper compares three different modeling approaches (Type 1, Type 2, and Type 4) for perceived value using data from an in‐flight survey. The questionnaire covered topics such as perceived service quality and overall satisfaction, price perception, customer value, and customer retention.

Findings

The theoretical discussion repeatedly emphasizes that only the formative modeling of perceived value fits the arguments put forward in the existing literature. This study replicates and extends a study by Lin et al. in the airline service context. The paper reports details about the impact of the proposed seven “get” and “give” components, together with an analysis of the consequences perceived value has on satisfaction, loyalty, and word‐of‐mouth.

Research limitations/implications

The findings suggest extensions and improvements concerning measurement and conceptual issues.

Practical implications

Perceived value shows a substantial effect on behavioral consequences. Service operations must observe the perception of atmospherics emerging from the main service encounters next to considering functional aspects.

Originality/value

Misconceptualizations of multi‐item constructs are well known. However, critical discussions and empirical tests are still scarce in the tourism field. This paper tests and compares different conceptual approaches for perceived value in a service context.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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