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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2021

Foteini Kravariti, Emeka Smart Oruh, Chianu Dibia, Konstantinos Tasoulis, Hugh Scullion and Aminu Mamman

Based on a study of internationally oriented Greek small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), and using the lens of institutional theory, this paper extends the…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on a study of internationally oriented Greek small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), and using the lens of institutional theory, this paper extends the understanding of the extent to which Greece's institutional context influences talent management (TM). In so doing, the authors focussed on the key TM practices employed by SMEs to enhance and sustain TM: talent acquisition, development and retention. The authors also explore how these practices are shaped by the Greek institutional context.

Design/methodology/approach

Employing a multiple case-study approach, the authors conducted 18 interviews in six distinctive SMEs operating in north, central and southern Greece. The data were thematically analysed to identify patterns across all SMEs.

Findings

This study found that unlike multinational corporations, internationally oriented Greek SMEs adopt a more inclusive approach to TM practices as well as that the country's institutional context presented important yet not deterministic hurdles. The authors also found that SMEs adopt an opportunistic approach to talent acquisition by utilising appropriate available sources to reach out for available talent. The authors provided evidence that SMEs adopt a hybrid approach to talent development in addressing talent scarcity. Finally, this study reported that talent retention is significantly appreciated by SMEs, who offer a range of intrinsic and extrinsic incentives to retain their talented workforce.

Practical implications

This study provides stakeholders with insights into how effective TM practices can be considered a lifeline to organisational sustainability – particularly for SMEs in the contemporary challenging and fiercely competitive business environment. It also highlights the potential of inclusive TM practices to be part of an effective workforce management strategy: Relative to the prevailing institutional dynamic, stakeholders (policymakers and human resource practitioners) must engage in the multiple areas of individual talent acquisition, development and retention.

Originality/value

In a context of reforms, this study reports on TM practice in internationally oriented Greek SMEs. The authors also add to the literature on TM in SMEs by providing evidence on the conceptualisation and management of global talent in this context.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 November 2017

Vlad Vaiman, David G. Collings and Hugh Scullion

3470

Abstract

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Margaret Linehan and Hugh Scullion

The increased internationalization of business in recent years has made the understanding of international human resource management problems more important for executives…

1715

Abstract

The increased internationalization of business in recent years has made the understanding of international human resource management problems more important for executives in multinational companies. In recent years researchers have paid considerable attention to the issues of adjustment to international assignments, while comparatively little research activity has been paid to the topic of repatriation, i.e. re‐entry and adjustment back to the home country. Despite the growth in the number of women in international management there are very few studies of the repatriation of female corporate executives. The focus of this paper is directed at understanding repatriation from the perspective of senior female expatriates whose voice has been silent for too long in international human resource management research.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Margaret Linehan, Hugh Scullion and James S. Walsh

From the extant research in international human resource management it is evident that women are not progressing to senior international management positions at comparable…

5074

Abstract

From the extant research in international human resource management it is evident that women are not progressing to senior international management positions at comparable rates to their male counterparts. Previous research has estimated that only 3 percent of expatriate managers are women. This paper argues that female international managers have to overcome many additional overt and covert barriers before being developed for international assignments. Based on an extensive empirical research study conducted with senior female international managers in a European context, the paper highlights a number of the barriers which the interviewees believed limit women’s international career opportunities. The paper also highlights the implications of these barriers for international human resource management policies and practices.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2001

Margaret Linehan and Hugh Scullion

The particular focus of this paper is female expatriates in Europe, which is a relatively under‐researched area. A total of 50 senior female expatriate managers were…

3972

Abstract

The particular focus of this paper is female expatriates in Europe, which is a relatively under‐researched area. A total of 50 senior female expatriate managers were interviewed, representing a wide range of industry and service sectors. The aims of the paper are to highlight a number of critical factors which are necessary for successful female expatriate assignments. The results of the study show that female expatriates are disadvantaged in their careers because of the lack of organizational support which is readily available to their male counterparts. This lack of organizational support, together with the invisible barriers which constitute the glass ceiling, explain the relative scarcity of female expatriate managers.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Talent Management: A Decade of Developments
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-835-8

Article
Publication date: 25 May 2012

Vlad Vaiman, Hugh Scullion and David Collings

The paper sets out to understand the key issues that emerge in the context of decision making.

36531

Abstract

Purpose

The paper sets out to understand the key issues that emerge in the context of decision making.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a literature review.

Findings

First, the authors review debates around talent management decision making. Second, they examine some of the main factors currently influencing decision making in talent management. Third, they seek to identify some future research areas that will inform future decision making in talent management.

Practical implications

The paper will be of interest to practitioners in designing and developing talent management decision systems.

Originality/value

The paper presents a state of the art review of talent management decision marking.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 50 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 January 2016

Hugh Scullion, Vlad Vaiman and David G. Collings

645

Abstract

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 19 September 2022

Abstract

Details

Talent Management: A Decade of Developments
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-835-8

Book part
Publication date: 19 September 2022

Eva Gallardo-Gallardo and Marian Thunnissen

Conducting relevant research is a cornerstone of good academic practice. However, considering academics and practitioners’ divergent paradigms and social systems, it is…

Abstract

Conducting relevant research is a cornerstone of good academic practice. However, considering academics and practitioners’ divergent paradigms and social systems, it is challenging to undertake impactful research. Indeed, the research–practice gap remains an essential issue in human resource management research. There have been several calls for translating research for dissemination, making it more societally relevant, and beginning conversations and activities that move beyond the confines of the academic context. In fact, research on talent management (TM) has been accused of lagging in offering organizations vision and direction. Understanding the perceived causes and potential solutions for relevant problems is a real need to successfully narrow the TM research–practice gap. Thus, the purpose of this chapter is to offer an in-depth discussion on the research–practice gap in TM. To do so, we first identify the critical dimensions of research relevance that will help us to ground our discussion regarding the applicability of current academic TM research. By doing this, we seek to understand better what is happening with TM research, which should then help provide insights into how its practical impact can be improved.

Details

Talent Management: A Decade of Developments
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-835-8

Keywords

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