Search results

1 – 10 of 37
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 July 2021

Foteini Kravariti, Emeka Smart Oruh, Chianu Dibia, Konstantinos Tasoulis, Hugh Scullion and Aminu Mamman

Based on a study of internationally oriented Greek small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), and using the lens of institutional theory, this paper extends the…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on a study of internationally oriented Greek small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), and using the lens of institutional theory, this paper extends the understanding of the extent to which Greece's institutional context influences talent management (TM). In so doing, the authors focussed on the key TM practices employed by SMEs to enhance and sustain TM: talent acquisition, development and retention. The authors also explore how these practices are shaped by the Greek institutional context.

Design/methodology/approach

Employing a multiple case-study approach, the authors conducted 18 interviews in six distinctive SMEs operating in north, central and southern Greece. The data were thematically analysed to identify patterns across all SMEs.

Findings

This study found that unlike multinational corporations, internationally oriented Greek SMEs adopt a more inclusive approach to TM practices as well as that the country's institutional context presented important yet not deterministic hurdles. The authors also found that SMEs adopt an opportunistic approach to talent acquisition by utilising appropriate available sources to reach out for available talent. The authors provided evidence that SMEs adopt a hybrid approach to talent development in addressing talent scarcity. Finally, this study reported that talent retention is significantly appreciated by SMEs, who offer a range of intrinsic and extrinsic incentives to retain their talented workforce.

Practical implications

This study provides stakeholders with insights into how effective TM practices can be considered a lifeline to organisational sustainability – particularly for SMEs in the contemporary challenging and fiercely competitive business environment. It also highlights the potential of inclusive TM practices to be part of an effective workforce management strategy: Relative to the prevailing institutional dynamic, stakeholders (policymakers and human resource practitioners) must engage in the multiple areas of individual talent acquisition, development and retention.

Originality/value

In a context of reforms, this study reports on TM practice in internationally oriented Greek SMEs. The authors also add to the literature on TM in SMEs by providing evidence on the conceptualisation and management of global talent in this context.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 November 2017

Vlad Vaiman, David G. Collings and Hugh Scullion

Downloads
2698

Abstract

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Margaret Linehan and Hugh Scullion

The increased internationalization of business in recent years has made the understanding of international human resource management problems more important for executives…

Downloads
1690

Abstract

The increased internationalization of business in recent years has made the understanding of international human resource management problems more important for executives in multinational companies. In recent years researchers have paid considerable attention to the issues of adjustment to international assignments, while comparatively little research activity has been paid to the topic of repatriation, i.e. re‐entry and adjustment back to the home country. Despite the growth in the number of women in international management there are very few studies of the repatriation of female corporate executives. The focus of this paper is directed at understanding repatriation from the perspective of senior female expatriates whose voice has been silent for too long in international human resource management research.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Margaret Linehan, Hugh Scullion and James S. Walsh

From the extant research in international human resource management it is evident that women are not progressing to senior international management positions at comparable…

Downloads
4950

Abstract

From the extant research in international human resource management it is evident that women are not progressing to senior international management positions at comparable rates to their male counterparts. Previous research has estimated that only 3 percent of expatriate managers are women. This paper argues that female international managers have to overcome many additional overt and covert barriers before being developed for international assignments. Based on an extensive empirical research study conducted with senior female international managers in a European context, the paper highlights a number of the barriers which the interviewees believed limit women’s international career opportunities. The paper also highlights the implications of these barriers for international human resource management policies and practices.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2001

Margaret Linehan and Hugh Scullion

The particular focus of this paper is female expatriates in Europe, which is a relatively under‐researched area. A total of 50 senior female expatriate managers were…

Downloads
3856

Abstract

The particular focus of this paper is female expatriates in Europe, which is a relatively under‐researched area. A total of 50 senior female expatriate managers were interviewed, representing a wide range of industry and service sectors. The aims of the paper are to highlight a number of critical factors which are necessary for successful female expatriate assignments. The results of the study show that female expatriates are disadvantaged in their careers because of the lack of organizational support which is readily available to their male counterparts. This lack of organizational support, together with the invisible barriers which constitute the glass ceiling, explain the relative scarcity of female expatriate managers.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 May 2012

Vlad Vaiman, Hugh Scullion and David Collings

The paper sets out to understand the key issues that emerge in the context of decision making.

Downloads
34802

Abstract

Purpose

The paper sets out to understand the key issues that emerge in the context of decision making.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a literature review.

Findings

First, the authors review debates around talent management decision making. Second, they examine some of the main factors currently influencing decision making in talent management. Third, they seek to identify some future research areas that will inform future decision making in talent management.

Practical implications

The paper will be of interest to practitioners in designing and developing talent management decision systems.

Originality/value

The paper presents a state of the art review of talent management decision marking.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 50 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 January 2016

Hugh Scullion, Vlad Vaiman and David G. Collings

Downloads
596

Abstract

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 25 April 2008

Annette Begley, David G. Collings and Hugh Scullion

The purpose of this paper is to examine the self‐initiated repatriation experience of native professionals as they return to the labour market in the Republic of Ireland…

Downloads
1742

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the self‐initiated repatriation experience of native professionals as they return to the labour market in the Republic of Ireland of their own volition and without the support of an employer.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methodology was employed to gather the data. In total, 40 responses were received from an initial open solicitation calling for research participants. Following a short survey receiving 34 responses, individuals who had returned without the aid of an employer to the Republic of Ireland and were willing to participate in further research were invited to participate in either a focus group discussion or in‐depth individual interviews. Ultimately, there were seven participants in the focus group and eleven individual in‐depth interviews.

Findings

The study found that the experiences of those in this study returning of their own volition and those of the more traditional repatriate do not seem to differ significantly across the facets of adjustment relating to adjustment in the general home country environment and adjustment to home country nationals, although subtle variations may be found. The main differences may be found when one investigates the facet of adjustment to work. Given that those returning of their own initiative are not returning to a position within a parent company, they must seek out their own employment. This adds a further source of stress and upheaval to an already difficult repatriation process.

Research limitations/implications

This is an exploratory study and hence requires further empirical verification. Nonetheless the study provides some useful signposts for future study in the area.

Originality/value

This research is unique in that it bridges a significant lacuna in the existing international human resource management literature by concentrating on the self‐initiated repatriation experience (SRE). This research is all the more important given that increasing numbers of individuals have returned to Ireland to seek work at their own discretion with the advent of the Celtic Tiger.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2001

Margaret Linehan and Hugh Scullion

This paper focuses on selecting, training and developing female executives for international assignments. The perspective explored is that of currently employed senior…

Downloads
3878

Abstract

This paper focuses on selecting, training and developing female executives for international assignments. The perspective explored is that of currently employed senior female executives in a wide range of organisations in a number of European countries, who have made at least one international career move. The findings of the research illustrate an organisational bias against females in the selection process for international assignments, a severe shortage of pre‐departure training and very little organisational attention given to female career development. This research is particularly relevant as European empirical research has not been conducted with senior female international executives, presumably because of their relative scarcity. Empirical work with senior female international managers in Europe is now necessary in order to explain why international management is still generally reserved for the male manager. Finally, some strategies for internationalising female managers are presented.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 6 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

Margaret Linehan and Hugh Scullion

This paper focuses on the repatriation of senior female international managers in western Europe and establishes that the repatriation phase of the international career…

Downloads
2457

Abstract

This paper focuses on the repatriation of senior female international managers in western Europe and establishes that the repatriation phase of the international career move may be even more stressful than expatriation. It is argued that female international managers may experience more difficulties than their male counterparts because of their pioneering roles. Finally, the paper identifies that home‐based mentors and access to networks while abroad are important factors in contributing to the successful repatriation of international managers.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

1 – 10 of 37