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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2021

Huajiang Yu and Yoshi Takahashi

This study sought to examine the detailed mechanism of employee perceptions of commitment-based human resource practices (CBHRPs) to employee knowledge-sharing behavior…

Abstract

Purpose

This study sought to examine the detailed mechanism of employee perceptions of commitment-based human resource practices (CBHRPs) to employee knowledge-sharing behavior (i.e. knowledge collection and knowledge contribution) by unveiling the “black box” of trust in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on data from 383 employees in China's Top Innovators in 2016, path analysis was used to test six hypotheses.

Findings

Employee perceptions of CBHRPs, namely, selection, incentives and training and development, were positively related to employees' trust in coworkers, supervisors and the organization, which in turn was positively related to employees' knowledge collection and contribution behavior. Trust in the workplace fully mediated the relationship between employee perceptions of CBHRPs and employee knowledge sharing. Among CBHRPs, training and development practices had the strongest effects on employees' knowledge-sharing behavior. Among trust, trust in coworkers was found to be the closest related to knowledge-sharing behavior. Knowledge contribution was more related to CBHRPs through trust than knowledge collection was.

Practical implications

Organizations can employ CBHRPs to enhance trust in the workplace and encourage employees to contribute toward and collect knowledge. Organizations need to pay more attention to employees' long-term investment, such as employee training and development. Organizations can perform human resource practices consistently and ensure that all employees are aware of practices in use to enhance employees' understanding of these practices.

Originality/value

This study provides a detailed understanding of the relationship between human resource management and knowledge sharing. It also presents new empirical evidence in the research fields of human resource management and knowledge management, with implications for the development of employees' knowledge-sharing behavior.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 January 2021

Roksana Binte Rezwan and Yoshi Takahashi

In this study, the authors examine how employees' retention intentions are related to their proactive personalities through the theoretical lens of the model of…

Abstract

Purpose

In this study, the authors examine how employees' retention intentions are related to their proactive personalities through the theoretical lens of the model of motivational force of turnover and the model of proactive motivation. More specifically, the authors also verify the partial mediation of work engagement on the main relationship and moderation of high-performance human resource practices (HPHRPs) in the process, which has rarely been explored previously.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypothesized model was tested using partial least squares structural equational modeling on a sample of 221 employees of a bank in Bangladesh.

Findings

The results showed that having a proactive personality is positively related to retention intentions due to enhanced work engagement. However, the effect of the interaction between having a proactive personality and HPHRPs was found to be not significant on work engagement and retention intention.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by exploring the reason behind mixed results found in the relationship between having a proactive personality and retention intentions through work engagement as a mediator and HPHRPs as a contextual boundary condition in a single model.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 51 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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