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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2008

Howard H. Frederick

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the content of a special issue of Journal of Enterprising Communities focusing on indigenous entrepreneurs.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the content of a special issue of Journal of Enterprising Communities focusing on indigenous entrepreneurs.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a brief description of the six contributions to the special issue.

Findings

The papers are found to range over New Zealand, Australia, Hawaii, Sweden Samoa and Ghana.

Originality/value

The papers comprising this special issue are of value in increasing understanding of how uniquely indigenous political, economic and social systems can explain cultural, social and political factors that both inhibit and enhance indigenous economic prosperity.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Howard Frederick

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 32 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2017

T. Elon Dancy, Bryan K. Hotchkins, Crystal A. deGregory and Stevie Johnson

This chapter discusses the sociohistories that shape the current existential realities for HBCU education in the Caribbean, particularly the University of the Virgin…

Abstract

This chapter discusses the sociohistories that shape the current existential realities for HBCU education in the Caribbean, particularly the University of the Virgin Islands. The distinction, Anglophone Caribbean (also commonly referred to as the British West Indies), is a way of naming the intentional displacement and conquering of the indigenous people of the islands. Following a theorization of colonization, the chapter discusses the politics of higher education in the Anglophone Caribbean that influence the existence of the only HBCU outside the continental US, The University of the Virgin Islands. This context is essential to understanding the university’s founding and modern existence.

Details

Black Colleges Across the Diaspora: Global Perspectives on Race and Stratification in Postsecondary Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-522-5

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2008

Paul Tapsell and Christine Woods

This paper examines the models used to teach and encourage indigenous entrepreneurial activity, with a focus on indigenous entrepreneurship in a Maori context.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the models used to teach and encourage indigenous entrepreneurial activity, with a focus on indigenous entrepreneurship in a Maori context.

Design/methodology/approach

In particular, the paper explores the pedagogical challenges from the perspective of indigenous entrepreneurship understood from a Maori context and draws on an historical and cultural analysis of kin accountability within a tribal context to explore the pedagogical challenges faced when working with a new generation of aspiring entrepreneurially‐minded Maori. Three short case studies are provided as illustrative examples.

Findings

The paper finds that entrepreneurial models focusing on opportunity‐seeking potiki (aspiring younger individuals) will likely remain limited in application until they successfully integrate the genealogical check and balance of the potiki, namely the elder‐rangatira. This rangatira: potiki customary leadership tension has been Maori society's generative survival portal to taking advantage of new opportunities (potikitanga) for 100 or more generations. The paper suggests that while Maori ventures may adequately reflect what constitutes successful commercial entrepreneurship, such ventures also need to be further developed in terms of kin‐accountability beyond current social/economic entrepreneurial thinking if they are to legitimately benefit Maori society.

Originality/value

Although only one cultural context is examined, this paper demonstrates the potential benefit of a deeper understanding of the cultural genealogical setting when developing models to work with indigenous entrepreneurs.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2003

Howard H Frederick and Ella Henry

Polynesian settlers arrived in Aotearoa (in te reo, or Māori language, “Land of the Long White Cloud”) about the 10th century. Aotearoa was visited briefly by the Dutch…

Abstract

Polynesian settlers arrived in Aotearoa (in te reo, or Māori language, “Land of the Long White Cloud”) about the 10th century. Aotearoa was visited briefly by the Dutch navigator Abel Tasman in 1642. However, it was not until 1769 that the British naval captain James Cook and his crew became the first Europeans to explore New Zealand’s coastline thoroughly. The word Māori meant “usual or ordinary” as opposed to the “different” European settlers. Before the arrival of Europeans, Māori, or indigenous Polynesian inhabitants of New Zealand, had no name for themselves as a nation, only a number of tribal names. The original meaning of Pākeha, the settlers, was a person from England. With time, Pākeha became the word to describe fair-skinned people born in New Zealand. We use the word Pākeha here in the sense of the New Zealand census as a European New Zealander.

Details

Ethnic Entrepreneurship: Structure and Process
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-220-7

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2008

Dennis Foley

The purpose this paper is to determine the impact that culture and social capital has on indigenous entrepreneurs' business networking.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose this paper is to determine the impact that culture and social capital has on indigenous entrepreneurs' business networking.

Design/methodology/approach

A comparative case study analysis was undertaken on a three‐nation sample of indigenous entrepreneurs in Australia, Hawaii and New Zealand. The specific research questions investigated were: does culture influence indigenous entrepreneurs' networking, and does social capital influence indigenous entrepreneurs' networking? Participants were stand‐alone commercial operators.

Findings

Reduced social capital for indigenous Australians resulted in active social networking to be a necessity in the operation of their basic business functions, the role of the family was negligible to negative, they were dependent on racial acceptance, they experienced little diversity in their networking, their business relationships were often that of dependence with a distinct separation between social and business networking interactions. The Hawaiians displayed a solid cultural capital base with spontaneous drivers in the interaction of relationships, networks were culturally accepted, the family role was supportive, a dynamic networking interaction ensued, networking was diverse and well maintained, they took an avid interest in their networking relationship which for many was personal and their networking relationships were highly integrated between their social and business spheres. Maori displayed a solid cultural capital base. Networks were culturally accepted, the family role was supportive, a dynamic networking interaction ensued with strong economic motivators, networking was diverse and well maintained, they took an avid interest in their networking relationship which culturally supported and their networking relationships were highly integrated between their social and business spheres.

Practical implications

This research provides an increased understanding of the business environment for policy makers, NGOs, business support organisations and the indigenous entrepreneurs themselves. The relationship between culture and social networking which is stimulated or reduced by the presence of varying levels of social capital can and will assist the indigenous entrepreneurs in their business planning.

Originality/value

This paper provides the reader with a new perspective on how the existence of social capital impacts on networking for indigenous entrepreneurs.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2008

Maria Ude´n

The purpose of this paper is to investigate an entrepreneurial process with unusual characteristics, focusing on Sámi micro and mezo level entrepreneurial logics and terms.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate an entrepreneurial process with unusual characteristics, focusing on Sámi micro and mezo level entrepreneurial logics and terms.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study is a Sámi community in Sweden, where a gender equality project developed into involvement with global innovations systems, in advanced networking development. The paper builds on ethnological methodology and an interactive approach. Market signalling theory is applied, uniquely for this paper, to public funding decisions.

Findings

The paper found anticipation among Sámi of mobile ICT to take over the key role in herding, from the present mechanized and motorized era. The many‐faceted entrepreneurial process contradicts a fundamental split between survival and self expression mode for economic strategy taken for granted in, e.g. Richard Florida's theory on the creative class. Regarding public funding for research and entrepreneurial initiatives, the paper finds that the national level has made itself accessible, while the regional level administrator has pushed the initiative to “other” markets.

Research limitations/implications

Conclusions cannot be but provisional based on one case. As very few cases of this type are known the findings are yet of value for the design of further research and policy.

Originality/value

Indigenous peoples' and women's roles in the information society are not self‐evident. The case shows fruitful possibilities. Turning to market signaling theory prepares for further development of quantitative evaluation, e.g. equal opportunity and inclusion policy implementation, and has not previously been done in relation to this case.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2008

Smile Dzisi

The purpose of this paper is to explore the personal profile and entrepreneurial activities of indigenous Ghanaian women and to provide updated research to raise awareness…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the personal profile and entrepreneurial activities of indigenous Ghanaian women and to provide updated research to raise awareness about the significant impact of the indigenous women‐run small to medium‐sized enterprises on Africa countries' economies.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed a mixed methodology research design where both qualitative and quantitative methods were used. Mail surveys were used to collect data from 241 indigenous Ghanaian women and in addition, 20 of these women were purposefully selected and interviewed.

Findings

Indigenous Ghanaian women were found to exhibit many similarities with their counterparts in other countries in terms of their personality traits. However, they differed in other aspects such as their educational backgrounds and modes of entrepreneurial skills acquisition. Through their entrepreneurial activities the women have made substantial contributions to the economic growth of Ghana in terms of innovation, job creation, and reduction in poverty and unemployment.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation is the restricted locale of the sample. The sample however is a reasonably representative of all the ten municipalities and indigenous communities in Ghana, and as a result the findings can be generalized to all indigenous women entrepreneurs in Ghana.

Practical implications

The paper shows that the indigenous women's small businesses are very important to economic and social development. Indigenous women's entrepreneurship, properly harnessed, has great potential as a tool for transforming African economies.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature due to the scarcity of publications about indigenous women's economic activities in Africa. The paper is useful for policy makers in Africa and researchers wishing to pursue indigenous entrepreneurship and gender studies.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2008

Peter Wiltshier and Andrew Cardow

The purpose of this paper is to highlight indigenous and endogenous components of community capacity development through a focus on enterprise with renewed vigour and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight indigenous and endogenous components of community capacity development through a focus on enterprise with renewed vigour and fervency attributable to local power elites and local collaboration and cooperation.

Design/methodology/approach

The twenty‐first century identifies good practices in many aspects of bottom‐up planning and implementation in neoliberal political economies. New Zealand is for many reasons, due to scale, skills and education, an example of endogenous development that is used globally for best practice studies. This paper specifically identifies and explores the local responses to the challenge of democracy and opportunities for diversification through tourism services provision on the Chatham Islands.

Findings

The paper notes that community capacity and governance on the Chathams has been the subject of discussion in recent years and the focus has been directed to conflicts in governance and possibly inappropriate policy and practice coordination. Although the refocus on endogenous development, empowerment and devolution of responsibility has a long pedigree in the context of the neoliberal economy, insufficient attention has been paid to the skills, inclination, social and economic capital for indigenous enterprise, more so in an environment of isolation, relative deprivation and dependence.

Originality/value

This paper highlights indigenous and endogenous components of community capacity development through a focus on enterprise with renewed vigour and fervency attributable to local power elites and local collaboration and cooperation. A useful model of indigenous tourism development and its endogenous antecedents is considered at the conclusion.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Cuc Nguyen, Howard Frederick and Huong Nguyen

The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of governmental support policies and socio-cultural influences on female entrepreneurship in rural Vietnam. As such…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to explore the impact of governmental support policies and socio-cultural influences on female entrepreneurship in rural Vietnam. As such, the study addresses an important literature gap concerning female entrepreneurship within rural communities in South East Asia.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with six female entrepreneurs and six female non-entrepreneurs in northern Vietnam to examine the influence of various environmental factors on female entrepreneurship in a rural setting.

Findings

The results suggest that government pro-entrepreneurship policies, together with private sector interventions, have had an impact on rural Vietnam. Yet females in rural and remote Vietnam are still constrained by societal prejudices, financial limitations, and limited entrepreneurship educational opportunities.

Originality/value

The paper's originality lies in its review of the circumstances confronting women in rural Vietnam and its findings concerning the impact of environmental factors on female entrepreneurship in this setting.

Details

International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-6266

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