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Article

Howard Day and Rupert Kelton

The purpose of this paper is to explain the rationale and methodology applied to the rental valuation of wet led (i.e. pub or bar) retail leisure outlets. The paper does…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain the rationale and methodology applied to the rental valuation of wet led (i.e. pub or bar) retail leisure outlets. The paper does not cover the valuation of other leisure property (e.g. restaurants, hotels).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper opens with a brief outline of the factors and legislative changes which have shaped the public house market over the past 15 years. This is followed by a explanation of the rental valuation methods in use in the pub and bar sector and examination of the impact of some current issues – in particular the impact of the full implementation of the Licensing Act 2003 along with other legislative and regulatory changes. Finally the paper comments on some of the issues relevant to freehold investment purchases of public houses and bars.

Findings

As a consequence of the nature of the industry, profits based valuations continue to dominate the market and this raises difficult questions of method and interpretation particularly, as the market is further complicated by legislative and regulatory changes introducing greater uncertainty. With regard to public house and bar freehold investment changes in the structure of the market have had a significant impact on perceptions of the investment quality of the leisure sector with consequences both for flows of capital and the structure of yields in the market place.

Practical implications

Valuers need to be aware that freehold investment values in this sector have potentially peaked and that investment decisions in the sector should be based upon sustainable rent.

Originality/value

The paper is of use to all valuers in this niche market and provides a practical understanding of the profits test method of valuation from which a sustainable rent may be derived.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Keywords

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Article

Mitchell Langbert, Michael Stanchina and Donal Grunewald

This case study aims to illustrate the interaction of organizational culture, human resource (HR) policy and firm performance. It contrasts the cultures of two…

Abstract

Purpose

This case study aims to illustrate the interaction of organizational culture, human resource (HR) policy and firm performance. It contrasts the cultures of two science‐driven organizations – the Navy's nuclear submarine force and Merck, the large pharmaceutical firm – and traces the reaction of one individual to two organizations – the United States nuclear navy and Merck & Co., a large pharmaceutical firm.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a case study based on field interviews and secondary sources.

Findings

The task‐oriented culture of the submarine fleet is compared to Merck's relations and team‐oriented corporate environment. Management skills such as flexibility, power and influence, interpersonal communication, self‐awareness and goal setting can influence career outcomes. Managerial skills are important in all settings, but a given style's efficacy is contingent upon organizational context. Adaptability is important, as is personal mission. Thus, the case examines how organizational culture, HR policies and leadership interact with an individual's career outcomes and organizational performance as well.

Research limitations/implications

Because this is a case study it is not generalizable. However, the issues depicted in the case have been recognized in the managerial skills literature. The case study serves to illustrate and deepen managerial skills concepts.

Practical implications

This case study has illustrative value as well as hypothesis and theory‐building value, but is not generalizable.

Originality/value

There is relatively little research on the specifics of how to apply managerial skills in a corporate setting. Hence, the case covers important, sensitive material of practical and theoretical value.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

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Article

Howard Jay Strauss

This column is written by Howard Strauss, the manager of Advanced Applications at Princeton University. Advanced Applications is a small group that is charged with…

Abstract

This column is written by Howard Strauss, the manager of Advanced Applications at Princeton University. Advanced Applications is a small group that is charged with tracking current and emerging information technology and using it in innovative ways to build applications that improve the effectiveness of the University community. Recently Howard's group developed PNN ‐Princeton News Network, a CWIS (Campus Wide Information System) that has been distributed to nearly 200 colleges and universities around the world. Advanced Applications is involved in many other cutting‐edge applications ranging from an expert‐like system to allow unattended scanning to building an imaging system for the University library.

Details

Academic and Library Computing, vol. 9 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-4769

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Case study

Andrew Tiger and Robert Howard

Kiwanis Pancake Day – a service operations management case study.

Abstract

Title

Kiwanis Pancake Day – a service operations management case study.

Subject area

Operations management.

Study level/applicability

Undergraduate and MBA OM courses.

Case overview

Kiwanis International is a global service organization dedicated to improving the world by helping children. The Durant, Oklahoma chapter holds its primary annual fundraiser the first Tuesday of November, which is also Election Day. The chapter sells and serves fresh pancakes throughout the day; therefore, the event is the Kiwanis Pancake Day. While serving in his first Pancake Day, Robert Howard, a new Kiwanian, notices service operations management issues such as long lines, spiky demand, and customers leaving before being served. Based on his management experience in the grocery business and his academic training in queuing systems, Robert performs an analysis of the system with the purpose of improving service operations.

Expected learning outcomes

Perform queuing analysis., Understand demand management., Explain the psychology of waiting.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes and spreadsheet‐based multiple‐server simulator.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Exploring Australian National Identity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-503-6

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Article

Howard Jay Strauss

What is this Thing Called CWIS? Once you're sure you need a CWIS, you might like to know just what it is you've decided you must have. In October 1989, I presented the…

Abstract

What is this Thing Called CWIS? Once you're sure you need a CWIS, you might like to know just what it is you've decided you must have. In October 1989, I presented the paper “University‐Wide General‐Interest Online Information Systems That Work — And That You Can Afford” to the ACM SIGUCCS conference. The title of this paper is really a definition of an ideal CWIS. If you spot something that fits this definition, it is definitely a fine CWIS. Unfortunately there are many CWIS imposters that fit only a few parts of this definition. Don't be surprised when those CWISes fail to deliver all of the advantages of a CWIS.

Details

Academic and Library Computing, vol. 9 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-4769

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Article

Essam Mansour

The purpose of this paper is to asses the role of social networking sites (SNSs) in the 25 January 2011 Egyptian Revolution, also known as the “Arab Spring”.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to asses the role of social networking sites (SNSs) in the 25 January 2011 Egyptian Revolution, also known as the “Arab Spring”.

Design/methodology/approach

The research methods used were an adaptive form of snowball sampling of a heterogeneous demographic group of participants in the Revolution, used to select focus groups to explore a range of relevant issues.

Findings

SNSs are shown to have played a central and pivotal role in the events known collectively as the Arab Spring. Their importance as a source of non‐governmental information and as a means of informing the external and internal community of internal events is highlighted by all participants.

Originality/value

The paper outlines research into contemporary events of global significance.

Details

Library Review, vol. 61 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

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Article

Howard Jay Strauss

It's No Use. For the last six years, since I first got involved with CWISs, I've written dozens of CWIS articles, taught CWIS seminars in every imaginable place, and…

Abstract

It's No Use. For the last six years, since I first got involved with CWISs, I've written dozens of CWIS articles, taught CWIS seminars in every imaginable place, and generally have been a CWIS evangelist to anyone who would listen — and to many who would not. And I haven't been alone in spreading the word on how to do CWISs right. Steve Worona, Judy Hallman, Tim McGovern, Dan Updegrove, and Flossie Stavinsky, to name just a few, have been proudly carrying the CWIS banners too. By now you must have heard — probably several times from several people — why you need a CWIS, how to organize one properly, and what pitfalls to avoid in making one available. What more could one possibly hear about CWISs that hasn't been heard many times over?

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Article

HyunSeung Koh and Susan C. Herring

The purpose of this paper is to provide ebook designers and researchers with design insights by promoting historical knowledge about books and reading as sources of ideas…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide ebook designers and researchers with design insights by promoting historical knowledge about books and reading as sources of ideas to implement in current and future ebooks.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors review historical features of books and practices of reading that have been implemented, weakened, or lost over time, referring to historical texts and resources, and relate them to ebook viewers (software) and readers (hardware) that are currently on the market. In particular, the review focuses on the physical form of the book and the practices of reading, annotation, and bookshelving.

Findings

While some older forms and reading practices have been implemented in ebook devices, others have been forgotten over time, due in part to physical constraints that are no longer relevant. The authors suggest that features that constrained print books and print reading in the past might actually improve the design of ebooks and e-reading in the present.

Research limitations/implications

This review is necessarily based on a limited set of existing historical sources.

Practical implications

Translating insights into novel tangible designs is always a challenging task. Ebook designers can gain insights from this paper that can be applied in a variety of design contexts.

Originality/value

No previous work on ebook design has foregrounded historical aspects of books and reading as viable sources of ideas to implement in ebooks.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

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Article

THE question of display in libraries becomes more important with the days. It is therefore a peculiar pleasure to us to publish a fine article by Mr. Savage on this. From…

Abstract

THE question of display in libraries becomes more important with the days. It is therefore a peculiar pleasure to us to publish a fine article by Mr. Savage on this. From his earliest days the ex‐President has been deeply and practically interested in book‐display. We believe that nearly forty years ago he and Mr. Jast worked out many experiments in it which are occasionally revived by those who have quite forgotten their origin. He was, we think, the first librarian here to take an ordinary shop as a branch library and dress its window as if it were a bookshop. Before him few English libraries used colour to any extent, or were aware of the aesthetic value of plants, flowers, curtains and well‐shaped furniture.

Details

New Library World, vol. 40 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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