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Book part
Publication date: 24 November 2021

Douglas A. Schuler, Reginald Young, Asiya K. Kazi and Jeffrey de Groot

This chapter explores Food for Change, a social entrepreneurial program created by the Houston Food Bank. Food for Change explicitly considers the interlinkages of social…

Abstract

This chapter explores Food for Change, a social entrepreneurial program created by the Houston Food Bank. Food for Change explicitly considers the interlinkages of social problems within an individual. Food for Change collaborates with educational and training organizations and healthcare providers to use supplemental food resources to address clients' needs antecedent to food insecurity. We propose a model to conceptualize how food insecurity is influenced by multiple levels of social determinants. We then describe the Food for Change program and offer lessons about the holistic nature of clients, the productivity and challenges of interorganizational collaborations to address the roots of social problems, and the forethought and courage of organizational leadership to try to create self-sufficient clients who might become liberated from their services.

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 24 November 2021

Abstract

Details

Social Entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-790-6

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 24 November 2021

Abstract

Details

Social Entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-790-6

Article
Publication date: 2 October 2007

Laurie Bonney, Rob Clark, Ray Collins and Andrew Fearne

The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the importance of a strategic approach to collaborative innovation and the use of a value chain research methodology for…

7485

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the importance of a strategic approach to collaborative innovation and the use of a value chain research methodology for identifying opportunities for co‐innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

Value chain analysis is used to map three flows in the Houston Farms value chain; material flow, information flow and relationships. Having diagnosed the current level of co‐innovation we then identify improvement projects and opportunities for co‐innovation to reduce cost and add value, for the benefit of the value chain as a whole.

Findings

The application of the value chain analysis methodology to the Houston Farms value chain revealed the importance of strategy and robust processes in key areas for co‐innovation – R&D and new product development. It also revealed that small businesses can enjoy a degree of success as a result of comparative advantage in certain areas but that sustainable competitive advantage cannot occur by chance – identifying the potential for co‐innovation is an important first step in the right direction.

Research limitations/implications

The value chain innovation roadmap represents a useful framework for exploring the current state and future capability for co‐innovation in a value chain. The value chain analysis methodology is an effective diagnostic tool as it focuses on what happens at the interface between stakeholders and how this relates to what final consumers regard as value adding, rather than traditional financial and functional KPIs which make it difficult to explore the competitiveness of the value chain as a whole.

Originality/value

The explicit and objective measurement of what consumers value is an important addition to the value chain analysis methodology and the co‐innovation roadmap is an original attempt to illustrate the core drivers and capabilities for achieving co‐innovation in a value chain. The insights from the case demonstrate the value of this approach to companies who are open to innovation and recognise the need to focus the use of scarce value‐adding resources on specific value chains and the needs and wants of final consumers therein.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2007

383

Abstract

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Abstract

Details

Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2018

Fiona H. McKay, Megan Bugden, Matthew Dunn and Chantelle Bazerghi

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of asylum seekers who were entitled to use a foodbank but who had ceased attending the service, to understand why…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experiences of asylum seekers who were entitled to use a foodbank but who had ceased attending the service, to understand why they were not using the charity, and to investigate their food-related experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed a mixed-method approach utilising telephone interviews. Interviews were conducted with 70 asylum seekers in Melbourne, Australia, between September 2015 and February 2016. Interviews explored food-related settlement experiences, food insecurity and experiences of hunger.

Findings

Two-thirds of participants were identified as experiencing food insecurity. Despite food and financial insecurity, participants were not using the foodbank as frequently as they were entitled as: the food was not culturally or religiously appropriate to them; asylum seekers with income felt uncomfortable taking food from others who were perceived to be in greater need; or because they were experiencing transport barriers. Participants also experienced a range of physical and mental health concerns.

Originality/value

Ensuring asylum seekers have access to culturally appropriate foods and services is essential. However, given the diversity in foodbank membership, it may not be feasible to provide all of the desired foods at no cost; instead, increased access to culturally appropriate foods may be achieved through a subsidy programme. Novel or alternative approaches to community engagement and food distribution may be needed to increase food security and to decrease hunger in this group.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 18 February 2021

Cortney L. Norris, Scott Taylor Jr and D. Christopher Taylor

The purpose of this systematic review is to highlight some of the business model changes restaurants, bars and beverage producers undertook to modify their operations in…

37309

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this systematic review is to highlight some of the business model changes restaurants, bars and beverage producers undertook to modify their operations in order to not only stay in business but also to better serve their employees and communities during the COVID-19 crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

An analysis was conducted on 200 industry articles and categorized into three major themes: expansion of take-out/delivery, innovative practices, and community outreach/corporate support, each are further subdivided into additional themes. The systematic review is further supported by personal interviews with industry professionals.

Findings

This research finds that there were many different approaches used in adjusting business models in response to the dining restrictions put in place due to COVID-19. From these approaches, themes were developed which resulted in uncovering some suggestions such as developing contingency plans, being flexible and creative, eliminating menu items, investing in a communication platform and getting involved with local government. In addition, some practices operators should be mindful of such as selling gift cards and starting a crowdfund.

Research limitations/implications

This research provides a systematic analysis of business model changes that occurred due to COVID-19 dining restrictions. Researchers can use this information as a guide for further analysis on a specific theme introduced herein.

Practical implications

This research offers several practical implications which will assist the industry should another similar event occur in the future. The systematic analysis describes and documents some suggestions as well as practices to be mindful of in preparing contingency plans for the future.

Originality/value

This research documents an unprecedented time for the hospitality industry by examining how restaurant, bar and beverage producers around the country responded to COVID-19 restrictions. Distilling the multitude of information into succinct themes that highlight the business model changes that occurred will aid future research as well as operators.

Details

International Hospitality Review, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-8142

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Rocco R. Vanasco

This paper examines the role of professional associations, governmental agencies, and international accounting and auditing bodies in promulgating standards to deter and…

25930

Abstract

This paper examines the role of professional associations, governmental agencies, and international accounting and auditing bodies in promulgating standards to deter and detect fraud, domestically and abroad. Specifically, it focuses on the role played by the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA), the Institute of Internal Auditors (IIA), the Institute of Management Accountants (IMA), the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE), the US Government Accounting Office (GAO), and other national and foreign professional associations, in promulgating auditing standards and procedures to prevent fraud in financial statements and other white‐collar crimes. It also examines several fraud cases and the impact of management and employee fraud on the various business sectors such as insurance, banking, health care, and manufacturing, as well as the role of management, the boards of directors, the audit committees, auditors, and fraud examiners and their liability in the fraud prevention and investigation.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1989

Emiel W. Owens

An adequate variety of food necessary to provide a propernutritional balance has always been a topic of prime concern for socialeconomists. Moral and political concern…

Abstract

An adequate variety of food necessary to provide a proper nutritional balance has always been a topic of prime concern for social economists. Moral and political concern caused the initiation of a series of studies focusing on the magnitude and causes of undernutrition. This article addresses concerns about some economic and health consequences of undernutrition and discusses some adverse health effects that may be associated with improper food balances. Findings suggest that a high percentage of undernutrition in the USA is concentrated in areas where social and economic deprivation is most prevalent, and shows that a complex of factors in the culture of poverty appear to be linked to undernutrition and non‐organic retardation. Two farm work crews were tested over a year with the objective of gaining more information about their dietary habit and nutritional status. Dietary deficiencies expressed as Bitot Spots (27.7 per cent) Visible Caries or ulceration (21.6 per cent) were found consistently among workers in the study sample population. Using F statistics and controlling for sex, male workers were found to be more adversely affected by dietary deficiencies than female workers.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 16 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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