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Article

Kathleen Boyle

His paper looks at the implications of a judicial review last July of four cases concerned with the eligibility of service charges for Housing Benefit funding. It explains…

Abstract

His paper looks at the implications of a judicial review last July of four cases concerned with the eligibility of service charges for Housing Benefit funding. It explains why the NHF recommends that funding for tenancy support should remain part of the housing system rather than be moved to social services.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article

Yi Niu

The paper's aim is to estimate the benefits and costs of China's affordable housing program, as well as to provide recommendations to this housing policy.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper's aim is to estimate the benefits and costs of China's affordable housing program, as well as to provide recommendations to this housing policy.

Design/methodology/approach

The Cobb‐Douglas utility function is employed to estimate the net benefits of the affordable housing policy. Both of the sunk costs and current costs are computed, and an improved housing affordability index is used to measure the levels of housing affordability in cities in China.

Findings

The total net benefits of this policy are estimated to range from $234,176.7 million to ¥271,020.4 million. The costs are divided into sunk costs and current costs, computed to be ¥447,598.63 million and ¥328,685.21 million, respectively. The supply size of affordable dwellings is far from adequate due to the low level of housing affordability in China.

Research limitations/implications

The data in this study is insufficient and some information such as the income of occupiers has yet to be estimated. However, if more individual data was available, the conclusion would be confidential.

Practical implications

From this paper the policymakers may understand how to estimate the welfare efficiency of affordable housing policy, adjust the participant regulations and determine the supply of affordable houses.

Originality/value

This paper estimates the benefits and costs of China's affordable housing program as the first study in this area. The Cobb‐Douglas utility function was used in the analysis of China's housing policy.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

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Book part

Alan Murie

This chapter addresses housing policy in England since 2007 and changes in housing opportunities and inequalities. The credit crunch and its aftermath were experienced…

Abstract

This chapter addresses housing policy in England since 2007 and changes in housing opportunities and inequalities. The credit crunch and its aftermath were experienced across the United Kingdom, and speeded the established trend to greater inequality. Many problems identified in England are relevant elsewhere, but the distinctive housing policies adopted in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland are not discussed here. The chapter argues that the policy direction adopted since 2010 failed in its ambition to increase housing supply and home ownership and further increased social and spatial inequalities.

Details

Inequalities in the UK
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-479-8

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Book part

Adrienne Roberts

The proliferation of homelessness and housing precariousness, along with a dramatic growth in food banks, are two signs that while parts of the UK economy may be…

Abstract

The proliferation of homelessness and housing precariousness, along with a dramatic growth in food banks, are two signs that while parts of the UK economy may be recovering from the 2008 financial crisis and recession, the same cannot be said for the living conditions of much of the poor and working class population. Much of the media discussion has centered on the ways in which these social ills have been caused by government policy, particularly cuts to social and welfare services introduced under the banner of “austerity.” I argue in this paper, however, that a narrow focus on austerity risks obscuring some of the longer-term structural transformations that have taken place under neoliberal capitalism, namely: (1) financialization and (2) the privatization of social reproduction. Situating these two trends within a longer history of capitalism, I argue, allows us to understand the contemporary housing and food crises as specific (and highly gendered) manifestations of a more fundamental contradiction between capital accumulation and progressive and sustainable forms of social reproduction. Doing so further helps to locate the dramatic proliferation of household debt, which has been supported by both processes, as both cause and consequence of the crisis in social reproduction faced by many UK households.

Details

Risking Capitalism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-235-4

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Article

Robert Wieser and Alexis Mundt

This paper aims to examine the main characteristics of the housing taxation and subsidy systems in six European Union countries. The structure of this support over the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the main characteristics of the housing taxation and subsidy systems in six European Union countries. The structure of this support over the past two decades, before and after the global financial crisis has been investigated and its total effective dimensions have been approximated.

Design/methodology/approach

Official national data and existing literature on housing policy expenses have been analysed and the authors add their own estimations of missing data, where possible. Latest changes in housing policy guidelines and expenses were interpreted.

Findings

It was found that state support for housing is heavily underestimated by official data in most countries, mainly due to missing estimates for the value of imputed rents tax relief, reduced VAT rates and low real estate and capital gains taxation. Our estimates suggest that total public support for the housing sector reaches more than 3 per cent of the gross domestic product in three of the six countries, and about 2 per cent in the others. State support to the housing sector has developed quite differently in the investigated countries over the past decades. In particular, there was no universal downward trend.

Originality/value

This is the first attempt to provide a more comprehensive analysis of national housing policy expenses applying a very broad definition of state support for housing. In particular, we consider indirect tax advantages to the housing sector that are generally not taken into account. Furthermore, we apply a discounted present value approach of current housing policy expenses to facilitate international comparison.

Details

Journal of European Real Estate Research, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-9269

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Article

Paul Sandford and James Shepherd

This paper aims to give guidance on the level of service charges that can be claimed by residents in sheltered housing as part of their housing benefit claims.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to give guidance on the level of service charges that can be claimed by residents in sheltered housing as part of their housing benefit claims.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the relevant legislation and recent opinions and rulings of both the Upper Tribunal and the Supreme Court.

Findings

A broad based non arithmetical approach must be taken, particularly as many key words are not statutorily defined.

Originality/value

Claimants, advocates and decision makers should use the guidance outlined when considering housing benefit claims by sheltered housing residents.

Details

Social Care and Neurodisability, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0919

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Article

Jenny Pannell and Imogen Blood

This briefing paper was commissioned by Help the Aged to inform a meeting held earlier this year. The recommendations from that meeting are summarised at the end of the…

Abstract

This briefing paper was commissioned by Help the Aged to inform a meeting held earlier this year. The recommendations from that meeting are summarised at the end of the briefing. The paper draws on the following sources: a short survey of national advice, housing and older people's organisations carried out in April 2002, a brief review of previous research reports on older people and housing advice, and a summary of current government and other initiatives relevant to older people and housing advice.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article

Emily Bird

This article highlights the links between housing and health and suggests that the health sector has much to benefit from joined‐up working with the housing and support…

Abstract

This article highlights the links between housing and health and suggests that the health sector has much to benefit from joined‐up working with the housing and support sector. There are advantages to both sectors of working in this way, particularly in the area of commissioning services. By working creatively together at key points along the care pathway, local partners can support each other in the delivery of services. Many housing associations are uniquely placed to deliver services that offer key solutions to person‐centred working and can help to build healthier communities.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Book part

Yu Xie, Qing Lai and Xiaogang Wu

Prior research showed that danwei, the work unit, was very important in determining workers' social, economic, and political lives in pre-reform urban China. In this…

Abstract

Prior research showed that danwei, the work unit, was very important in determining workers' social, economic, and political lives in pre-reform urban China. In this chapter, we argue that danwei continues to be an agent of social stratification in contemporary urban China. Using data from a 1999 survey that we conducted in three large Chinese cities, Wuhan, Shanghai, and Xi'an, we assess the extent to which workers' socioeconomic well-being depends on the financial conditions of their danwei. Results show that the financial situation of danwei remains one of the most important determinants of earnings and benefits. However, the explanatory power of danwei's financial situation is much greater for earnings than for benefits.

Details

Work and Organizationsin China Afterthirty Years of Transition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-730-7

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Article

Joaquim Montezuma

Residential property in a multi‐asset portfolio context has been considered from two substantially different perspectives: institutional investor's and the household's…

Abstract

Residential property in a multi‐asset portfolio context has been considered from two substantially different perspectives: institutional investor's and the household's perspective. This paper constitutes the first of two related surveys on the role of residential property in a multi‐asset portfolio. The paper provides an introduction to housing property investment at a macro level and reviews the main empirical issues related to housing investment in an institutional portfolio context. The literature in this regard generally supports the evidence that residential property is a more effective hedge against inflation than both shares and bonds. Additionally, the reviewed studies generally report that unsecuritised housing investment not only generates risk‐adjusted returns comparable to those of bonds and shares, but also exhibits low levels of correlation with classic asset groups of institutional portfolios.

Details

Property Management, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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