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1 – 10 of over 2000
Article
Publication date: 16 July 2021

Paul Blaise Issock Issock, Mercy Mpinganjira and Mornay Roberts-Lombard

This study aims to provide empirical evidence and a different perspective on the relevance of the traditional marketing mix in social marketing programmes. This is a…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide empirical evidence and a different perspective on the relevance of the traditional marketing mix in social marketing programmes. This is a response to the ongoing debate about the (in)compatibility of the traditional marketing mix (the 4Ps) in the field of social marketing. In doing so, this study examines the important role that the stages of behaviour change play in influencing the effectiveness of traditional marketing mix elements in the context of recycling in South African households.

Design/methodology/approach

This study follows a quantitative method, relying on a survey of 699 heads of households in South Africa. Multigroup analysis and structural equation modelling were applied to test the impact of stages of changes on the potential effect of marketing mix elements on the intention to recycle household waste.

Findings

The results established that although the traditional marketing mix elements have a marginal effect on the intention to recycle household waste, further analyses revealed that this impact of the marketing mix is contingent on the stage of change in which the target audience is found. Thus, the findings indicated that the marketing mix elements significantly influence the intention to recycle when the target audience is at the contemplation and preparation phases.

Originality/value

Whilst both critics and proponents of the adoption of the traditional marketing mix in social marketing initiatives have provided relevant arguments, the debate had remained largely theoretical. This study discusses the limitations of the traditional marketing mix in behaviour change programmes and the need for a segmented approach based on the stages of behaviour change when using the 4Ps. However, given the hegemony of the 4Ps in the social marketing literature, this study sheds light on the appropriate “Ps” to activate to influence recycling behavioural intention at different stages of change.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Hamdiyah Alhassan, Felix Ankomah Asante, Martin Oteng-Ababio and Simon Bawakyillenuo

The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors that encourage households’ source separation behaviour in Accra and Tamale Metropolises in Ghana.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors that encourage households’ source separation behaviour in Accra and Tamale Metropolises in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a cross-sectional design, 855 households of Ghana were interviewed based on the theoretical framework of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB). The ordered probit regression model was employed to examine the factors that influence households’ source separation intention.

Findings

The results indicated that educational attainment of head of household, total income of household, occupation type of household head, information, past experience with source separation, inconvenience in terms of time, space and availability of formal source separation scheme, attitude, subjective norm and the location of the respondents significantly predicted households’ solid waste separation intentions.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional design does not determine causality but an association. Thus, future studies should examine actual household waste separation behaviour by using the experimental design to test the TPB model.

Practical implications

To promote solid waste separation at source, the public should be educated and provided with solid waste separation schemes that are efficient and compatible with households’ preference.

Originality/value

This study was partly motivated by the fact that despite the benefits associated with source separation, little attention has been given to formal source separation in Ghana. Moreover, there are limited studies on source separation behaviour in Ghana using the TPB as the theoretical framework.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Seamus O'Reilly and Anita Kumar

Increased economic development in emerging economies has spurred the growth of “fast fashion” and this in turn has led to not only an opportunity for recycling activity…

1368

Abstract

Purpose

Increased economic development in emerging economies has spurred the growth of “fast fashion” and this in turn has led to not only an opportunity for recycling activity but also a need to do so from a sustainability perspective. The purpose of this paper is to consider the emergence of such recycling activity in a developing economy.

Design/methodology/approach

A process flow approach guides identification of stakeholders and an analysis of reverse supply chain structure and processes. An adapted and extended theory of planned behaviour (TPB) model is employed to explore recycling behaviour at the household level.

Findings

The authors find rather haphazard garment recycling channels in Delhi NCR. In particular product acquisition processes are characterised by poor value appropriation and provide a limited service to households. This is supported by the householder survey that finds poor satisfaction levels with most recycling channels. PLS path modelling tested hypotheses that each of the four constructs (attitudes, subjective norm, perceived control and sense of duty) are significant determinants of “intention to plan to recycle”. Having tested for various possible meditating effects, sense of duty was found to act as a precursor to attitude. In this model all other constructs were significant determinants of intention to recycle garments. Thus the study highlights the role of “sense of duty” in attitude formation, a key determinant of intention to recycle garments. This highlights the importance of adherence to sustainable practices and the need for associated governance and regulation. Subjective norm points to the impact of a range of people, including experts. While perceived control points to difficulties encountered both from a self-efficacy and external (opportunity) perspectives.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that reverse supply chain design should address the limitations of the product acquisition process (especially poor value appropriation and limited collection services) and respond to household motivational factors and perceived difficulties.

Originality/value

The study considers the impact of the garment product lifecycle on household behaviour. In this context the adapted TPB model addressed the role of conscious planning. The model is extended to include sense of duty, this contributes to emerging work in this field.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 December 2022

Subrahmanyam Annamdevula, Sai S. Nudurupati, Raja P. Pappu and Ranendra Sinha

This study aims to extend the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) model to explain youth’s recycling behavioural intentions in India. Perceived moral obligation (PMO) to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to extend the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) model to explain youth’s recycling behavioural intentions in India. Perceived moral obligation (PMO) to perform such pro-environmental activities is incorporated in the TPB model. The study also aims to validate the extended version of TPB models with direct and indirect relationships and identify the best competing model among original TPB, extended TPB model “Model A” (moral obligation is an explanatory variable to recycling behaviour) and extended TPB model “Model B” (moral obligation as an explanatory variable to attitude, perceived behavioural control [PBC] and recycling behavioural intentions; and responsive variable to subjective norms) to predict Indian youth’s waste recycling behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

The descriptive study adopted a hypo-deductive research design to test the proposed extended TPB models. The study used a survey research design with a structured questionnaire. A sample of 782 youth with a mean age of 18 was obtained to perform the correlational analysis. The scale validity and reliability are measured using structural equation modelling and identified the robust model with higher explanatory power using the Chi-square difference (Δχ2) statistic test.

Findings

Results show that the extended TPB model “Model B” has a better fit and explanatory power than competing models to predict the waste recycling behaviour of youth. Further findings substantiate that PMO has a higher indirect effect on recycling intention. Model B supports the utility of moral obligation and its association with youth’s higher waste recycling intention and actual recycling behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

The study considers solid waste recycling in general, and therefore future research should test the proposed model specific to other household wastes like water recycling. Furthermore, future studies can experiment with the model with additional variables like perceived relative benefits, social benefits, self-efficacy and education level of the respondents. In a strict sense, the research concern the respondents and the generalisation to a broader population should be made with caution. Hence, further studies in various geographical areas with larger sample sizes would allow the generalizability of the results.

Practical implications

This research provides insights into PMO and its influence on recycling intention. Promoting waste recycling behaviour through campaigns, social pressure and accepting the phenomena of “significant others” will encourage better waste recycling behavioural purposes. Indian households who are highly concerned and obliged towards environmental protection would develop favourable attitudes and subjective norms towards waste recycling.

Social implications

The study proved the effect of subjective norms on intentions. This contention explains that recycling mostly happens within the house and is mostly not witnessed by society and friends. Therefore, adopting waste recycling behaviour is not socially acceptable as they are not fully aware of its benefits. Policymakers should create awareness to develop environmental-friendly behaviour through recycling solid waste and develop exclusive campaigns to sensitise the negative impact on the environment.

Originality/value

The study’s originality is to test the extended TPB model “Model B”, with PMOs as an additional key variable, which has higher explanatory power to predict the youth’s waste recycling behavioural intentions in the Indian context. PMO found a positive and significant effect on attitude, PBC and recycling behavioural intentions. The higher indirect result of PMO on behavioural purposes through TPB variables indicates the importance of personal moral obligation in pro-environmental behaviour.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Emy Ezura A Jalil, David B. Grant, John D Nicholson and Pauline Deutz

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the proposition that there is a symbiosis effect for exchanges between household waste recycling systems (HWRSs) and household

3553

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the proposition that there is a symbiosis effect for exchanges between household waste recycling systems (HWRSs) and household recycling behaviour (HRB) within the reverse logistics (RL) discourse.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper contains empirical findings from a two phase, multi-method approach comprising consecutive inductive and deductive investigations. The qualitative and quantitative data underpin exploratory and explanatory findings which broaden and deepen the understanding of this phenomenon.

Findings

Analysis identified significant interactions between situational and personal factors, specifically demographic factors, affecting HRB with key factors identified as engagement, convenience, availability and accessibility.

Research limitations/implications

Findings confirm the existence of a symbiosis effect between situational and personal factors and inform current research trends in the environmental sciences, behavioural and logistics literature, particularly identifying consumers as being an important pivot point between forward and RL flows.

Practical implications

Findings should inform RL-HWRSs design by municipalities looking to more effectively manage MSW and enhance recycling and sustainability. RL practitioners should introduce systems to support recovery of MSW in sympathy with communication and education initiatives to affect HRB and should also appreciate a symbiosis effect in the design of HWRSs.

Social implications

The social implications of improved recycling performances in municipalities are profound. Even incremental improvements in the performance of HWRSs can lead to enhanced sustainability through higher recycling rates, reduced diversion of MSW to landfill, decreases in pollution levels, reduced carbon footprints and reduction in depletion of scarce natural resources.

Originality/value

The paper marks an early contribution to the study of symbiosis in HWRSs and HRB pertaining to RL. Findings are offered that identify the key situational and personal factors that interact to affect enhanced HWRSs and also offer insights above those available in current multi-disciplinary literature that has largely examined such factors in isolation. Conclusions offer the possibility of an epistemological bridge between the social and natural sciences.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2021

Bente Flygansvær, Asta Gjetø Samuelsen and Rebecka Våge Støyle

Research shows a recycling behavior gap where end consumers are positive towards recycling but do not act in accordance with their intentions. Such a gap creates…

Abstract

Purpose

Research shows a recycling behavior gap where end consumers are positive towards recycling but do not act in accordance with their intentions. Such a gap creates challenges for reverse logistics systems. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how adaptations in reverse logistics systems towards end consumers-turned-suppliers can improve recycling behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

A framework with three propositions is developed and evaluated empirically using a two-group dependent post-test quasi-experimental design. The empirical setting is recycling of household waste. Three interventions are evaluated as: (1) the social norms nudge, (2) the distance nudge and (3) the availability nudge.

Findings

The results show that nudging improved recycling action behavior for the experimental group. Control group behavior remained constant.

Research limitations/implications

This paper suggests that the end-consumer’s role as suppliers needs to be included more actively into reverse logistics systems for products to enter the preferred loops of recycling in the circular economy.

Originality/value

A new field of climate psychology is used to explain challenges in reverse logistics systems and nudging is demonstrated as a tool with which to deal with them. The study also shows how quasi-experiments can be applied in logistics research.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 51 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 26 May 2020

Rafia Afroz, Mohammad Muhibbullah, Puteri Farhana and Mohammad Niaz Morshed

To achieve proper waste management, the disposal of electronic waste (e-waste) is one suitable method. Most developing countries, including Malaysia, are facing lack of…

2278

Abstract

Purpose

To achieve proper waste management, the disposal of electronic waste (e-waste) is one suitable method. Most developing countries, including Malaysia, are facing lack of e-waste recycling facilities and low household participation. Using a survey method using a questionnaire, this study aims to examine the intention of Malaysian households to drop-off their mobile phones to the nearest collection boxes (n = 600).

Design/methodology/approach

This study expanded the theory of planned behavior by adding environmental awareness and knowledge. In addition, the cost of disposal and the convenience of the available disposal infrastructure were measured as two parts of the perceived behavioral control.

Findings

The results of this study show that environmental knowledge and awareness have a significant impact on attitudes toward recycling intention of the households. In addition, it was also found that the attitude and cost of disposal infrastructure is positively related to household intention.

Originality/value

These results show that if e-waste collection boxes are provided to the nearest community and e-waste management information is distributed, this will increase household participation in e-waste management.

Details

Ecofeminism and Climate Change, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2633-4062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 April 2022

Sonal Thukral, Deep Shree and Shakshi Singhal

With the rapid increase in the consumption of electrical and electronic innovations, responsible management and recycling of electronic waste (e-waste) or waste electrical…

Abstract

Purpose

With the rapid increase in the consumption of electrical and electronic innovations, responsible management and recycling of electronic waste (e-waste) or waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) has been a significant concern for the governments, stakeholders, researchers and industry practitioners around the world. Consumer awareness, disposal behaviour and perception are chief facets of designing sustainable management strategies. Although researchers have widely studied e-waste over many years, the research focusing on consumer awareness about e-waste recycling has gained momentum recently. This paper aims to systematise the existing literature and explore future research prospects on household e-waste sorting behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

Web of science (WoS) core collection was searched using selected keywords to identify relevant articles published from 2001 to 2021. The search resulted in 1,156 research articles published from 2001 to 2021. After a detailed study, 85 articles were shortlisted for in-depth review. The review was conducted based on global trends, top journals, most prolific authors, most active e-waste research countries, and institutions centring on consumer participation in e-waste disposal and recycling behaviour. The present research has also identified around eleven factors that seem to have a bearing on consumer behaviour towards storage, disposal and recycling of e-waste.

Findings

E-waste research has gained increased attention in the last five years. The majority of the studies has focused on motivational factors and ignore the risks associated with handling e-waste. The present study reports the pertinent issue of lack of awareness among the masses about e-waste handling and disposal. Thus, bringing to the fore the lack of awareness programmes and initiatives. The analysis presents the gaps in the literature and future research agendas.

Originality/value

The review article will help in providing an in-depth understanding of consumer behaviour towards storage, disposal and recycling of e-waste and delineates the future direction of research that may be undertaken in this field of study.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 October 2010

Tanhum Yoreh

Recycling facilities are not available in most Ultra‐Orthodox (Haredi) Jewish neighborhoods in Israel. Servicing Ultra‐Orthodox communities would offer significant relief…

Abstract

Purpose

Recycling facilities are not available in most Ultra‐Orthodox (Haredi) Jewish neighborhoods in Israel. Servicing Ultra‐Orthodox communities would offer significant relief for rapidly bloating landfills. Haredi communities have highly religious lifestyles, very large families and tend to cluster together in communities, posing significant challenges in urban planning and policy. With careful planning and education these communities have the potential to be high‐yield recyclers, as the act of recycling plastic, paper and glass is not religiously prohibited. The purpose of this paper is to determine the feasibility of installing recycling facilities in two Ultra‐Orthodox neighborhoods in Jerusalem.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected by administering a short questionnaire to neighborhood residents and asking them questions about recycling behavior as well as demographic information.

Findings

Ultra‐Orthodox communities have a unique recycling narrative which determines the materials they are most likely to recycle. Rabbinical leaders and monetary incentives are instrumental in garnering support for recycling programs.

Research limitations/implications

The findings shed light on demographic variables which influence recycling behavior such as age, gender, household size and religiosity/ethnicity.

Practical implications

The rich data have significant planning and policy implications. As this study relies on statistically significant data, it is highly likely that the conclusions drawn are applicable to other Haredi neighborhoods and beyond.

Originality/value

As a whole, Ultra‐Orthodox attitudes and behaviors exposed in this study reveal, for the first time, a religious ethnography of recycling or a recycling narrative.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 April 2020

Jacques du Toit and Claire Wagner

The purpose of this article is to examine the effect of housing type, relative to demographics, on householders' self-reported recycling across low-, medium- and…

166

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to examine the effect of housing type, relative to demographics, on householders' self-reported recycling across low-, medium- and high-density housing without recycling facilities by using the theory of planned behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted amongst 580 households across houses, townhouses and apartments in Pretoria, South Africa. The household member most responsible for recycling completed a self-administered questionnaire. Data were analysed using factor and reliability analyses, decision trees and multivariate analysis of variance.

Findings

Age was the strongest predictor; the older the respondent, the more likely the household recycled. Housing type was the second strongest predictor with a significant increase in recycling in houses compared to townhouses and apartments. Subsequent analyses focussed on young respondents to control for age. Housing type had an overall non-significant effect on the factors behind recycling. Post hoc tests, however, suggest that young respondents in townhouses and apartments felt significantly less able to recycle, particularly because of lack of space and support from managing agencies.

Practical implications

For recycling to be acceptable to young people in medium- and high-density housing, interior architects and site planners should find innovative ways to make individual and communal facilities as convenient and accessible as possible to tenants, owners and recycling companies. The role of managing agencies is also critical.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to systematically examine recycling across three different housing types with recommendations for planning, design and further research.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 2000