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Article

Gang Peng, Ying Wang and Rammohan Kasuganti

This study seeks to develop the concept of technological embeddedness by extending the social embeddedness theory of economic actions to household computer adoption. It…

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to develop the concept of technological embeddedness by extending the social embeddedness theory of economic actions to household computer adoption. It also aims to propose a research framework in which technological embeddedness is a key factor that influences household computer adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

The US 1989‐2003 Computer and Internet Use Supplements to the Current Population Surveys are used to validate the proposed research framework.

Findings

The results show that technological embeddedness positively affects household computer adoption. In addition, the impact of technological embeddedness is positively moderated by household income, and this impact is particularly stronger on first‐time buyers than on repeat buyers.

Practical implications

The results provide important policy and managerial implications for encouraging household computer adoption and bridging the digital divide.

Originality/value

The paper proposes a new concept and develops a research framework for analyzing household computer adoption and technology adoption in general.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article

Gerry McKiernan

In an effort to facilitate the identification and use of highly‐relevant publications and resources relating to the social and economic implications of information…

Abstract

In an effort to facilitate the identification and use of highly‐relevant publications and resources relating to the social and economic implications of information, computation, and communication technologies, the National Science Foundation (NSF) recently funded a pilot project to create a Web‐based bibliographic database of significant materials. Within the framework of this database, users are able to browse citations to relevant topics or search for specific aspects. The nature of the selected resources, their description, and associated methods for searching, viewing, saving, and exporting are outlined. The features and functionalities of the host Web‐based database management software are also described.

Details

International Journal on Grey Literature, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-6189

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Article

Abdelkader Daghfous, Omar Belkhodja and Norita Ahmad

The purpose of this paper is to advance information technology (IT) adoption research and practice by investigating the process of knowledge transfer (KT) undertaken by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to advance information technology (IT) adoption research and practice by investigating the process of knowledge transfer (KT) undertaken by suppliers of IT innovations. The authors expound the intricacies of formal and informal mechanisms of the KT initiative that aims at augmenting the absorptive capacity (ACAP) of potential IT adopters with the objective of increasing the likelihood of adoption of new IT products or services.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors draw on case studies of ten IT suppliers to build on the limited research on KT for customers in IT adoption. The authors focus on the for customer type of KT from the standpoint of the IT supplier firm.

Findings

The authors’ results show that complexity of the IT product or service increases the reliance on formal and systematic KT initiatives. This paper also shows that there is a required minimum threshold level of initial customers’ ACAP in order for the KT initiative to be worthwhile for the supplier, especially for those offering complex IT products and services. However, IT suppliers were found to limit their reliance on KT when they believed that customers that became too knowledgeable might threaten the innovation’s diffusion.

Research limitations/implications

Since the authors’ case firms represented innovation suppliers, future studies should investigate customer-supplier dyads to explore and integrate the customer’s perspective in the analysis of the KT process. To this end, longitudinal studies would also provide immense insights into the KT process and how it evolves over time.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this paper consists of illuminating the workings of KT initiatives aimed at existing and potential customers from the standpoint of the IT innovation supplier. By focusing on the for customers aspect of KT, this paper advances the authors’ understanding of why and how IT suppliers should resort to formal vs informal KT mechanisms. The authors’ proposed framework also integrates and shows the roles of customers’ ACAP, complexity of the IT innovation, and tacitness of the knowledge transferred to the customers.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Abstract

Details

Beyond the Digital Divide: Contextualizing the Information Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-548-7

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Book part

Arief Rahman

Citizens are substantial stakeholders in every e-government system, thus their willingness to use and ability to access the system are critical. Unequal access and…

Abstract

Citizens are substantial stakeholders in every e-government system, thus their willingness to use and ability to access the system are critical. Unequal access and information and communication technology usage, which is known as digital divide, however has been identified as one of the major obstacles to the implementation of e-government system. As digital divide inhibits citizen’s acceptance to e-government, it should be overcome despite the lack of deep theoretical understanding on this issue. This research aimed to investigate the digital divide and its direct impact on e-government system success of local governments in Indonesia as well as indirect impact through the mediation role of trust. In order to get a comprehensive understanding of digital divide, this study introduced a new type of digital divide, the innovativeness divide.

The research problems were approached by applying two-stage sequential mixed method research approach comprising of both qualitative and quantitative studies. In the first phase, an initial research model was proposed based on a literature review. Semi-structured interview with 12 users of e-government systems was then conducted to explore and enhance this initial research model. Data collected in this phase were analyzed with a two-stage content analysis approach and the initial model was then amended based on the findings. As a result, a comprehensive research model with 16 hypotheses was proposed for examination in the second phase.

In the second phase, quantitative method was applied. A questionnaire was developed based on findings in the first phase. A pilot study was conducted to refine the questionnaire, which was then distributed in a national survey resulting in 237 useable responses. Data collected in this phase were analyzed using Partial Least Square based Structural Equation Modeling.

The results of quantitative analysis confirmed 13 hypotheses. All direct influences of the variables of digital divide on e-government system success were supported. The mediating effects of trust in e-government in the relationship between capability divide and e-government system success as well as in the relationship between innovativeness divide and e-government system success were supported, but was rejected in the relationship between access divide and e-government system success. Furthermore, the results supported the moderating effects of demographic variables of age, residential place, and education.

This research has both theoretical and practical contributions. The study contributes to the developments of literature on digital divide and e-government by providing a more comprehensive framework, and also to the implementation of e-government by local governments and the improvement of e-government Readiness Index of Indonesia.

Details

E-Services Adoption: Processes by Firms in Developing Nations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-325-9

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Article

Torsten J. Gerpott and Nima Ahmadi

To better understand the use intensity of e-government service offerings among citizens, a considerable number of studies have examined correlations between various…

Abstract

Purpose

To better understand the use intensity of e-government service offerings among citizens, a considerable number of studies have examined correlations between various attitudinal constructs related to such offerings and citizens’ service adoption (intentions). This investigational paper aims to take a different angle by exploring associations between a set of 11 objectively identifiable household and individual behavioral and socio-demographic characteristics on the one side and three levels of e-government services use on the other.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical analysis is based on survey responses of a random sample of 17,012 individuals residing in Germany.

Findings

Ordinal logistic regression analysis suggests that citizens with low use levels of public e-service offerings are most likely younger male persons with low levels of computer literacy, internet affinity and education, who have a migration background and live in small mid-level-income households located in rural communities.

Practical implications

The findings imply that public institutions may find it difficult to rapidly raise e-government acceptance by distributing only “technocratic” information explaining various service options. Public authorities should consider supplementing “pure” information programs by measures which ensure that the software of e-government service platforms is designed in a way guaranteeing a very high level of “usability”. Furthermore, they should analyze whether the benefits of providing e-government services in specific foreign languages outweigh the costs of such a service extension. If this is the case, an easy-to-use software menu item should be introduced which enables citizens to switch to another common foreign language.

Originality/value

The contribution of this paper results from the analysis of a set of objective predictors of e-government service use in a large random sample of citizens residing in Germany, whereas most prior studies are based on surveys of small convenience samples in other countries.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

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Article

Neil Selwyn

Although we now know much about children's use of information and communications technologies, researchers have yet to consider adequately the roles that children play in…

Abstract

Although we now know much about children's use of information and communications technologies, researchers have yet to consider adequately the roles that children play in shaping adults' computer use. Via household survey data from a randomised sample of 1,001 adults and in‐depth interview data from 100 of these initial respondents, this paper explores the meditating roles of children in: the purchasing/acquisition of computers by adults; adults' access to computers; the level and nature of adults' use (and non‐use) of computers; how adults learn to use computers; and how adults are supported when using computers. The paper concludes that while children play a variety of roles in adults' (non)adoption and (non)use of computers this influence is often tempered by a range of other factors and, indeed, should not be overstated. For example, while children appear to be a significant “official” factor in parents' and grandparents' adoption of computers they were rarely the sole reason for adults investing time and money in ICT – with a range of other self‐orientated reasons usually in attendance. In terms of adults' access to and use of ICT, the demands of children to use computers were a mitigating but not always dominant factor to be considered by parents. Similarly, children appear to play a peripheral role in supporting adults' use of ICT. The paper concludes by considering how the role of children in adults' use of ICT would appear to be often more symbolic than practical;, e.g. as an official justification for buying/adopting a computer rather than as a strong and sustained guiding force.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article

Ewa Ziemba

The purpose of this paper is to advance the information society research by examining and better understanding the impact of the adoption information and communication…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to advance the information society research by examining and better understanding the impact of the adoption information and communication technologies (ICT) within households on improving sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey questionnaire was used and data collected from 679 Polish households were statistically analyzed to understand the phenomena of ICT adoption and sustainability as well as identify correlations between them.

Findings

The research findings reveal that the ICT adoption is well described by the ICT outlay, information culture, ICT management and ICT quality, whereas sustainability is composed of ecological, economic, socio-cultural and political sustainability. Furthermore, the ICT quality, ICT management and information culture have a significant impact on sustainability, whereas the ICT outlay does not have such an impact.

Research limitations/implications

The research sample included Polish households only. Researchers may use the proposed approach and methodology to do similar analyses with different sample groups in other countries.

Practical implications

Households may find the results appealing and useful in enhancing the adoption of ICT, experiencing the full potential of ICT and deriving various benefits from the ICT adoption. The findings can help governments develop sound ICT adoption plans for implementing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Originality/value

The paper provides and verifies a new theoretical model of sustainable information society to depict various dimensions shaping the ICT adoption and their impact on different types of sustainability in the context of households.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Book part

Lloyd Levine

Access to high-speed Internet is essential for full and consequential participation in the civic, economic, and education systems of modern life. Yet 30% of Californians…

Abstract

Access to high-speed Internet is essential for full and consequential participation in the civic, economic, and education systems of modern life. Yet 30% of Californians continue to lack “meaningful Internet access” at home. This digital divide is worse among already disadvantaged communities and prevents rural, lower-income, and disabled individuals from fully participating in the civic, economic, and education systems of life in 2018. This chapter establishes the magnitude of the digital divide, examines the factors that contribute to the Divide, and looks at which groups are most affected. Successful government programs that invested in utility infrastructure and adoption, such as the Rural Electrification Act, the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act and the California Advanced Services Fund, are examined to provide a foundation for broadband specific policy recommendations. The chapter sets up a framework for policy recommendations by segmenting the population based upon the concepts of material and motivational access and establishing meaningful Internet access as the goal for policy-makers. The chapter puts forth a number of specific policy recommendations to address the technological disparity and prevent it from furthering the economic and educational divides.

Details

The M in CITAMS@30
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-669-3

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Article

Sally Rao Hill, Barry Burgan and Indrit Troshani

The purpose of this paper is to propose and test a model concerning broadband adoption in a rural setting.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose and test a model concerning broadband adoption in a rural setting.

Design/methodology/approach

A computer‐aided telephone survey was conducted to collect data to validate the proposed model in rural Australia.

Findings

It was found that relative advantage, utility outcomes, and facilitating conditions play a crucial role in explaining broadband adoption behavior amongst rural Australian households.

Practical implications

The key challenges to stakeholders involved in promoting broadband adoption in these settings are discussed in light of the findings.

Originality/value

A more realistic approach at household level was adopted to investigate broadband adoption in a rural setting. The theoretical framework offers a comprehensive view of broadband adoption applicable to rural Australia.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 111 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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