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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2013

Le Ma and Chunlu Liu

A panel error correction model has been developed to investigate the spatial correlation patterns among house prices. This paper aims to identify a dominant housing market…

Abstract

Purpose

A panel error correction model has been developed to investigate the spatial correlation patterns among house prices. This paper aims to identify a dominant housing market in the ripple down process.

Design/methodology/approach

Seemingly unrelated regression estimators are adapted to deal with the contemporary correlations and heterogeneity across cities. Impulse response functions are subsequently implemented to simulate the spatial correlation patterns. The newly developed approach is then applied to the Australian capital city house price indices.

Findings

The results suggest that Melbourne should be recognised as the dominant housing market. Four levels were classified within the Australian house price interconnections, namely: Melbourne; Adelaide, Canberra, Perth and Sydney; Brisbane and Hobart; and Darwin.

Originality/value

This research develops a panel regression framework in addressing the spatial correlation patterns of house prices across cities. The ripple-down process of house price dynamics across cities was explored by capturing both the contemporary correlations and heterogeneity, and by identifying the dominant housing market.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2020

Emad S. Mushtaha, Samar Al-Zwaylif and Sarah Ghalib

This research introduces a hypothesis for establishing typologies and patterns for architectural plans based on their climate, culture and orientation. The repetition and…

Abstract

Purpose

This research introduces a hypothesis for establishing typologies and patterns for architectural plans based on their climate, culture and orientation. The repetition and reproduction of spaces in architectural plans are rooted in mathematical equations. Factorial and permutation formulae are the type of equations used as scientific tools to define typology. In addition, a new perspective on culture and privacy in line with the Arabic house is included to illustrate the practicality of restricted plans according to cultural needs.

Design/methodology/approach

To make the approach accessible, the theory is integrated into a software using C++ as the programming tool. Accordingly, all patterns and typologies are reproduced by inserting digits or numbers to simulate the process of using permutations and factorials for the creation of diagrammatic patterns and, subsequently, architectural plans.

Findings

The authors recommend that this method be integrated in future housing studies at earlier stages to obtain a high number of alternatives for architectural plans. The results of mathematical permutation of this study will help architects and designers to evolve their methods and processes through creating alternative patterns and culture (and climate)-specific typologies to provide more design possibilities.

Originality/value

This study is set to improve the adjacency diagram theory into the adjacency diagram with orientation theory, which accounts for the geographical orientation to obtain more comprehensive and climate-responsive patterns.

Details

Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2011

Mahmood Fayazi

The purpose of this paper is to compare rural houses reconstructed by core housing method after the Manjil earthquake in 1990 and traditional housing. Also, other factors…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare rural houses reconstructed by core housing method after the Manjil earthquake in 1990 and traditional housing. Also, other factors such as residential space needs of residents, the role of the used structure in building the core units and the role of climatic conditions in the expansion of residential units have been investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

Some rural houses which were reconstructed by using core housing method – 86 rural houses – in 20 different villages were investigated using quantity and quality method. Also, the rate of satisfaction of inhabitants with their reconstructed houses was evaluated.

Findings

Although rural houses were reconstructed with inhabitants' participation and with use of local technology and materials, those houses had some characteristics contrary to traditional houses. Another problem was in the gradual expansion of spaces, which led to disharmonious and unbalanced growth and converted the houses into a complex and closed entity. It caused trouble in privacy and connections of family members and in the use of spaces.

Originality/value

The paper reports research generally done on rural houses which were reconstructed after the Manjil earthquake in 1990 and shows that this reconstruction experience was done by using core housing method. Also, how the core units were expanded was analyzed and advantages and disadvantages of this reconstruction experience were extracted. These results can be useful in planning and designing shelters for survivors of future disasters.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Du Lijing, Jian Huang, Daniel Singer and Gokhan Torna

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of social and economic factors on home ownership as an investment in American urban areas.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of social and economic factors on home ownership as an investment in American urban areas.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors run a spatial analysis using home ownership data on 817 American counties from US Census Bureau’s 2013 American Community Survey.

Findings

While the amenity value of home ownership is found to be important to overall housing tenure decisions, it is found to be less so for the ownership cohort without mortgages. Economic factors are found to impact the spatial pattern of owner-occupied housing without mortgage differently than that of all owner-occupied housing. The implications of these differences for investors are explored.

Research limitations/implications

The results may lack generalizability outside of the American urban areas.

Practical implications

As a result of the findings of this study, a shift in investor focus from minimizing initial housing costs to sustainable housing costs is recommended.

Originality/value

This study provides insights into the social and economic dimensions of owner-occupied housing in order to create a more profitable investing policy for promoting home ownership.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 45 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2009

Rodrigo García Alvarado, Dirk Donath and Luis Felipe González Böhme

Over the past three decades, a small community of eighty-four Chilean low-income families has built and improved their home incrementally, without any technical…

Abstract

Over the past three decades, a small community of eighty-four Chilean low-income families has built and improved their home incrementally, without any technical assistance, showing an impressive performance. A six square meters bathroom on a serviced plot of land with individual connection to potable water, sewerage, electricity and access roads, worked as a starting point back in 1974. However particular their rationale may seem, the individual history of their housing process reveals some general regularities in occurrence and duration of self-build activities, as well as size and allocation of the domestic spaces. A small random sample of fifteen households was selected to tell the story and explain the whys, hows, and whens of an ever-evolving housing process. Semi-structured interviews and building surveys were both combined to reconstruct the sequence of states of each housing process, with the awareness of the characteristic imprecision of oral information transfer. Alternative states were explored by constraint programming methods and spatial qualitative reasoning. Considering the hard constraints over the site morphology and services allocation, the results of the exploration stress how extraordinary lucid and intuitive the surveyed families are when making their design decisions. The article exposes a reconstructive case study on spontaneous growth patterns underlying an unassisted, incremental self-build housing dynamics.

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Laura Gabrielli, Paloma Taltavull de La Paz and Armando Ortuño Padilla

This paper aims to present the dynamics of housing prices in Italian cities based on unpublished data with regional details from the late 1960s, half-yearly base, for all…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the dynamics of housing prices in Italian cities based on unpublished data with regional details from the late 1960s, half-yearly base, for all main Italian cities measuring the average prices for three city dimensions: city centre, sub-centres and outskirts or suburbs. It estimates the Italian long-term house price index, city based in real terms, and shows a combination of methods to deal with large time-series data.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper builds long-term cycles based on the city (real) data by estimating the common components of cointegrated time series and extracting the unobservable signals to build real house price index for sub-regions in Italy. Three different econometric methodologies are used: Johansen cointegration test and VAR models to identify the long-term pattern of prices at the estimated aggregate level; principal components to obtain the common (permanent and transitory) components; and signal extraction in ARIMA time series–model-based approach method to extract the unobserved time signals.

Findings

Results show three long-term cycle-trends during the period and identify several one-direction causal non-permanent relationships among house prices from different Italian areas. There is no evidence of convergence among regional’s house prices suggesting that the Italian housing prices converge inside the local market with only short diffusion effects at larger regional level.

Research limitations/implications

Data are measured as the average price in squared meters, and the resulting index is not quality controlled.

Practical implications

The long-term trends on housing prices serve to implement further research and know deeply the evolution of Italian housing prices.

Originality/value

This paper contains new and unknown information about the evolution of housing prices in Italian regions and cities.

Details

Journal of European Real Estate Research, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-9269

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2018

Siti Nurazira Mohd Daud and Ainulashikin Marzuki

This paper aims to investigate Malaysia’s house prices behaviour by decomposing trend, cycle and stochastic component.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate Malaysia’s house prices behaviour by decomposing trend, cycle and stochastic component.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors perform an unobserved component model of a structural time series and Markov switching model that covers the period 1999Q1 to 2015Q4.

Findings

The results reveal that the variation in house price in Malaysia is best explained by its trend level, with a small role played by the cycle component; this implies the potential for gaining returns on investments in property by investors and households. The results also show that Malaysia’s HPI cycle is between 8 and 17 years which, in relative terms, is twice the length of the growth cycle and the business cycle in the economy. Meanwhile, the overall movement of HPI is forecast to have a marginal price increase up to 2028Q2.

Originality/value

As house prices remained elevated during the year, the house price dynamic is pivotal for understanding the source of changes in house price. With major findings centred on the relationship between house prices and macroeconomic as well as policy variables, little attention has been paid to composing the trend, cycle and seasonal pattern from the house price index, thus understanding the behaviour of house prices’ unobserved components.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2019

Shakil Bin Kashem

Disaster-resistant housing practices are widely promoted in developing countries as an integral component of climate adaptation efforts, particularly in rural hazard-prone…

Abstract

Purpose

Disaster-resistant housing practices are widely promoted in developing countries as an integral component of climate adaptation efforts, particularly in rural hazard-prone areas. However, how the prevailing housing practices are intertwined with rural livelihoods and how the external initiatives to promote disaster-resistant housing practices materialize in a contested marginalized space are key questions with social vulnerability implications that seldom receive adequate attention. This paper aims to explore these questions through case studies of two hazard-prone rural areas in Bangladesh.

Design/methodology/approach

The two study areas were selected considering the variation of risk patterns: one located in cyclone hazard-prone southern District of Noakhali and the other located in a flood hazard-prone area of Rajbari District. Existing housing practices in these two communities, their adoption of disaster-resistant housing options and their overall livelihood challenges were explored through questionnaire surveys, focus group discussions and transect walks.

Findings

As this study shows, safe housing practices are tertiary concerns for people living in those contested spaces after meeting livelihood challenges. Further, in the absence of formal land tenure, adaptation efforts that introduce disaster-resistant housing practices may fail to be effective.

Practical implications

The findings of this study demonstrate the need for a reorientation in the present approaches of climate adaptation (particularly, in case of housing practice) to make them more responsive to the adaptation challenges of socially vulnerable populations.

Originality/value

Most of the prior studies on disaster and rural housing have focused on the post-disaster housing recovery, but there is yet to have enough study that looked at households’ current housing strategies and, in particular, how land tenure and livelihood challenges influence their choices. This study fills this research gap and also provides evidence in support of considering the risk priority of marginalized vulnerable population while responding to the broader concerns of climate change.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 May 2020

Yamen N. Al-Betawi, Fadia H. Al Nassar, Ahmad A. Al Husban and Safa Al Husban

This study aims to trace the transformation in the form of apartment building and the connotations it has in understanding the changes that occurred in the Jordanian…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to trace the transformation in the form of apartment building and the connotations it has in understanding the changes that occurred in the Jordanian society’s lifestyle over the past five decades.

Design/methodology/approach

A comparative case study analysis has been conducted amongst 170 apartments, covering 70 design attributes related to aspects of appearance, spatial organisation, parking and access to building, outdoor space and finishing. This was followed by experts and households solicitation to help giving more confidence on the validity and reliability of findings regarding the sorts and justifications for the changes that have taken place in the form of apartments over the studied time frame.

Findings

The results reveal changes in design attributes indicating particular alterations in people’s lifestyle. New interests act in formulating recent housing design attributes. People seem to turn into a more open social life within public community but more privatised living amongst family members. People are becoming more attached to indoor modernised lifestyle, in homes and public areas where activities take place. This entails pursuing a more comfortable, facilitating and enjoyable life that presents luxury and tranquillity.

Originality/value

Understanding the relationship between transformations in the built form of apartment buildings and the associated social alterations provides useful insights towards improving housing provision to better match the ever-changing demands of people and respond to alterations in their lifestyles.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2012

Khaled Galal Ahmed

Most of the native citizens in the UAE live in public or private single-family houses. Given the tremendous cost of developing this type of housing and the inability of…

Abstract

Most of the native citizens in the UAE live in public or private single-family houses. Given the tremendous cost of developing this type of housing and the inability of providing single-family houses to cover all the current and future needs for public housing, high-rise residential buildings seem to offer an alternative. But the question is; does this type of housing suit the local communities in the UAE, especially in light of the failure of the previous western experiences?. Through addressing this question, the research proposes an approach towards a community-oriented design for high-rise residential buildings in the UAE.

The research first investigated the reasons behind the community-relevant shortcomings of the traditional high-rise residential developments in the West. Afterwards, it briefly reviewed the status quo of the community-relevant considerations in the design of the recently built high-rise residential buildings in the UAE, where it has been found that little concern has been devoted to the community needs. In an effort to find an answer to this problem, the research examined four recent design experiences as examples for the current universal efforts to design community-responsive high-rise residential developments. Some conceptual approaches were derived from these experiences that are envisaged to help reach an approach for the case of the UAE. Nonetheless, because of the unique social and cultural traits of the UAE native society one cannot rely on these global conceptual approaches alone. Instead, the research proposes an approach that, while benefiting from the relevant global experiences, is chiefly pivoted on the vertical reconfiguration of the idea of the ‘fareej’ as the smallest unit in the residential urban context both traditionally and in the future official urban plans in the UAE.

Details

Open House International, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

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