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Article
Publication date: 3 December 2020

Katy Kerrane, Andrew Lindridge and Sally Dibb

This paper aims to investigate how consumption linked with life transitions can differ in its potential to bring about ongoing liminality. By examining how consumers can…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how consumption linked with life transitions can differ in its potential to bring about ongoing liminality. By examining how consumers can draw on overlapping systems of resources, different ways in which consumers negotiate ongoing liminality following the transition to motherhood are identified.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted an interpretive, exploratory study using in-depth phenomenological interviews with 23 South Asian mothers living in the UK. The sample consisted of mothers at different stages of motherhood.

Findings

Following life transitions, consumers may encounter liminal hotspots at the intersection of overlapping systems of resources. The findings examine two liminal hotspots with differing potential to produce ongoing liminality. The study shows how consumers navigate these liminal hotspots in different ways, by accepting, rejecting and amalgamating the resources at hand.

Research limitations/implications

The research sample could have been more diverse; future research could examine liminal hotspots relating to different minority groups and life transitions.

Practical implications

Marketers need to examine the different ways in which consumers draw on different systems of resources following life transitions. The paper includes implications for how marketers segment, target and market to ethnic minority consumers.

Originality/value

Due to increasingly fluid social conditions, there are likely to be growing numbers of consumers who experience ongoing liminality following life transitions. A preliminary framework is presented outlining different ways that consumers negotiate ongoing liminality by drawing on overlapping systems of resources, broadening the understanding of the role that marketplace resources play beyond life transitions.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 55 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2014

Timothy Hart and Paul Zandbergen

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of user-defined parameters settings (e.g. interpolation method, grid cell size, and bandwidth) on the predictive…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of user-defined parameters settings (e.g. interpolation method, grid cell size, and bandwidth) on the predictive accuracy of crime hotspot maps produced from kernel density estimation (KDE).

Design/methodology/approach

The influence of variations in parameter settings on prospective KDE maps is examined across two types of interpersonal violence (e.g. aggravated assault and robbery) and two types of property crime (e.g. commercial burglary and motor vehicle theft).

Findings

Results show that interpolation method has a considerable effect on predictive accuracy, grid cell size has little to no effect, and bandwidth as some effect.

Originality/value

The current study advances the knowledge and understanding of prospective hotspot crime mapping as it answers the calls by Chainey et al. (2008) and others to further investigate the methods used to predict crime.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Yuran Jin, Shoufeng Ji, Xin Li and Jiangnan Yu

Additive manufacturing has achieved rapid development in recent years. The purpose of this paper is to visualize the intellectual landscapes of additive manufacturing and…

Abstract

Purpose

Additive manufacturing has achieved rapid development in recent years. The purpose of this paper is to visualize the intellectual landscapes of additive manufacturing and identify the hotspots and emerging trends of additive manufacturing, which can provide references for scholars, enterprises and governments to promote the development of theory and practice in the additive manufacturing field.

Design/methodology/approach

Science mapping is a fast-growing interdisciplinary field originated in information science and technology. Based on this methodology, guided by a computational approach, the paper visualizes the co-occurring keywords network and co-citation references network by CiteSpaceIII software to explore the hotspots and emerging trends of additive manufacturing by the following five indicators: highly cited keywords, burst keywords, clusters, landmark references and burst references.

Findings

“Additive manufacturing,” “3D printing,” “3D powder printing,” “consolidation phenomena,” “microstructure,” “rapid prototyping,” etc., are the main hotspots of additive manufacturing. The trends of additive manufacturing generally consist of three stages: the fundamental concepts stage from 1995 to 2000 (“rapid prototyping,” “additive manufacturing,” etc.), the approaches and techniques applications stage from 2001 to 2010 (“stereolithography,” “scaffold,” etc.), and the emerging trends stage from 2011 to the present (“stem cell”, “selective laser,” “ti-6al-4v,” etc.). The research is most abundant in 2010 and 2012. The medical field is an important hotspot of additive manufacturing. Additive manufacturing has been researched in interdiscipline.

Originality/value

The paper maps the perspective of additive manufacturing and explore the hotspots and emerging trends of additive manufacturing.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 30 April 2018

Spencer P. Chainey, Sophie J. Curtis-Ham, R. Mark Evans and Gordon J. Burns

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent and variation in the estimates to which crime can be prevented using patterns of repeats and near repeats, and whether…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent and variation in the estimates to which crime can be prevented using patterns of repeats and near repeats, and whether hotspot analysis complements these patterns.

Design/methodology/approach

Crime data for four study areas in New Zealand are used to examine differences in the extent of burglary repeat and near repeat victimisation. Hotspots of burglary are also created to determine the extent to which burglary repeats and near repeats spatially intersect hotspots.

Findings

The extent of repeats and near repeats varies, meaning there is variation in the estimated prevention benefits that repeat and near repeat patterns offer. In addition, at least half of the burglaries repeats and near repeats were not located within hotspots.

Research limitations/implications

The use of other techniques for examining crime concentration could be used to improve the research observations.

Practical implications

By showing that levels of repeats and near repeats vary, the extent to which these observations coincide in hotspots offers practitioners a better means of determining whether repeat and near repeat patterns are reliable for informing crime prediction and crime prevention activities.

Originality/value

The paper is the first known research study that explicitly measures the variation in the extent of repeats and near repeats and the spatial intersection of these patterns within crime hotspots. The results suggest that rather than considering the use of repeat and near repeat patterns as a superior method for predicting and preventing crime, value remains in using hotspot analysis for determining where crime is likely to occur, particularly when hotspot analysis emphasises other locations for resource targeting.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 41 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2018

Yuran Jin, Xin Li, R. Ian Campbell and Shoufeng Ji

3D printing is believed to be driving the third industrial revolution. However, a scientometric visualizing of 3D printing research and an exploration its hotspots and…

Abstract

Purpose

3D printing is believed to be driving the third industrial revolution. However, a scientometric visualizing of 3D printing research and an exploration its hotspots and emerging trends are lacking. This study aims to promote the theory development of 3D printing, help researchers to determine the research direction and provide a reference for enterprises and government to plan the development of 3D printing industry by a comprehensive understanding of the hotspots and trends of 3D printing.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the theory of scientometrics, 2,769 literatures on the 3D printing theme were found in the Web of Science Core Collection’ Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED) index between 1995-2016. These were analyzed to explore the research hotspots and emerging trends of 3D printing with the software CiteSpaceIII.

Findings

Hotspots had appeared first in 1993, grew rapidly from 2005 and peaked in 2013; hotspots in the “medical field” appeared earliest and have remained extremely active; hotspots have evolved from “drug”, “printer”, “rapid prototyping” and “3D printing” in the 1990s, through “laser-induced consolidation”, “scaffolds”, “sintering” and “metal matrix composites” in the 2000s, to the current hotspots of “stereolithography”, “laser additive manufacturing”, “medical images”; “3D bioprinting”, “titanium”, “Cstem cell” and “chemical reaction” were the emerging hotspots in recent years; “Commercial operation” and “fusion with emerging technology such as big data” may create future hotspots.

Research limitations/implications

It is hard to avoid the possibility of missing important research results on 3D printing. The relevant records could be missing if the query phrases for topic search do not appear in records. Besides, to improve the quality of data, this study selected articles and reviews as the research objects, which may also omit some records.

Originality/value

First, this is the first paper visualizing the hotspots and emerging trends of 3D printing using scientometric tools. Second, not only “burst reference” and “burst keywords” but also “cluster” and “landmark article” are selected as the evaluation factors to judge the hotspots and trends of a domain comprehensively. Third, overall perspective of hotspots and trends of 3D printing is put forward for the first time.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

William Webb

There has been much discussion about W‐LAN hotspots and the role they might play in communication systems. Over the last year, the number of hotspots around the world has…

Abstract

There has been much discussion about W‐LAN hotspots and the role they might play in communication systems. Over the last year, the number of hotspots around the world has grown rapidly. However, subscriber numbers have remained low and the industry continues to lose money. Some are now starting to accept that the current business model is not viable. This paper discusses the problems with the current deployment of hotspots and suggests that only when they become part of a wider integrated communications network will there be sufficient revenue potential to justify the current and planned deployment of W‐LAN hotspots.

Details

info, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Michele Florencia Victoria and Srinath Perera

The purpose of this paper is to identify the carbon intensive building elements or “carbon hotspots” of office buildings in order to maximise the carbon reduction…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the carbon intensive building elements or “carbon hotspots” of office buildings in order to maximise the carbon reduction potential during design stages.

Design/methodology/approach

Embodied carbon (EC) estimates of 28 office buildings in the UK were obtained and carbon hotspots of the sample (in accordance with the new rules of measurement (NRM) element classification) were identified using the 80:20 Pareto principle.

Findings

Frame, substructure, external walls, services and upper floors were identified as carbon hotspots of the selected sample. However, findings do not support the 80:20 ratio in this case but propose a ratio of 80:36. Stairs, internal walls and partitions, internal doors, wall finishes, ceiling finishes and fittings and furnishings were identified as carbon insignificant elements that have a lower EC reduction potential compared to the rest.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are applicable to office buildings in the UK but the methodology is adaptable to different types of buildings in other countries.

Originality/value

Findings unveil carbon intensive and carbon insignificant building elements of typical office buildings in the UK. This informs designers of the elements that could yield the highest potential EC savings via effective design choices. In addition, a logical design timeline is proposed for building elements based on their element hotspot category and design sequence to assist design decision making.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

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Article
Publication date: 13 October 2020

Hiroki Nakamura and Shunsuke Managi

Using a case study from Delhi, India, this study aims to investigate why perceived safety endures despite crimes in the neighborhood. Local residents in Delhi feel…

Abstract

Purpose

Using a case study from Delhi, India, this study aims to investigate why perceived safety endures despite crimes in the neighborhood. Local residents in Delhi feel considerably less fearful of crime in their neighborhoods, and a majority reported feeling safe in their neighborhoods, especially during the daytime.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper hypothesized that similar to the crime itself, perceptions of safety or the fear of crime, also tend to be concentrated in hotspots. Following a hotspot analysis based on the respondents’ perceptions of safety, the data gathered were applied to the perceived neighborhood structure. Using two perception-of-safety models, this paper could analyze the ripple effect of individual perception on the neighborhood by adding the calculated values of the perceived safety hotspot through hotspot analysis.

Findings

The results indicated that income, trust in others, attachment to the local neighborhood and police access can increase residents’ perceptions of safety. Additionally, the neighborhoods’ perception of safety was found to positively impact the individual’s perception of safety.

Research limitations/implications

This study was limited in terms of generalizing the findings. Further studies could potentially include not only other cities in India but also, cities in developing countries in Africa and Latin America, where residents tend not to fear crime despite high crime rates.

Practical implications

Residents’ perceived safety does not necessarily reflect local crimes and security. Local policies to improve residents’ perceptions of safety have to often be separated from crime reduction because a reduction in some crimes would not necessarily improve residents’ perception of safety. Contrarily, if the crime rate is high, as in the case of Delhi, people may have a moderate fear of crime across the neighborhood.

Originality/value

Notably, this study found that, along with trust in others and attachment to the local neighborhood, individuals’ perception of safety is positively affected by neighborhoods’ perception of safety, which is assessed by the alternate analytic model.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Guilherme Alencar, Gonçalo Ferreira, Abílio M.P. de Jesus and Rui Calçada

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the fatigue performance of a welded detail from a composite steel-concrete railway twin girder bridge caused by a passenger…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the fatigue performance of a welded detail from a composite steel-concrete railway twin girder bridge caused by a passenger train circulating at varying speeds, by identifying the dynamic amplification scenarios induced by resonance. For this purpose, the hotspot stress method is used, instead of the traditional nominal stress methods.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper assesses the fatigue behavior of a welded connection considering critical stress concentration locations (hotspot). Finite element analysis (FEA) is applied, utilizing both a global and a local submodel, made compatible by displacements field interpolation. The dynamic response is obtained through the modal superposition method. Stress cycles are extracted with the rainflow counting method and the fatigue damage is calculated with Palmgren-Miner’s rule. The feasibility of five submodels with different mesh densities, i.e. 1, 2, 4, 8 and 20 mm is verified.

Findings

An increase in the fatigue damage due to the resonance effect was found for the train traveling at a speed of 225 km/h. A good agreement between the computed fatigue damage for the submodels is achieved. However, a non-monotonic hotspot stress/fatigue damage vs mesh density convergence was observed with a peak observed for the 4 mm model, which endorses the mesh sensitivity that could occur when using the surface stress extrapolation detailed rules specified in the standards for the hotspot stress method.

Originality/value

Advanced dynamic analyses are proposed to obtain local stresses in order to apply a local method for the fatigue assessment of a bridge’s structure subjected to high-speed railway traffic on the basis of the mode superposition technique resulting in much less computing times.

Details

International Journal of Structural Integrity, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9864

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2007

Dirk Kutscher, Jörg Ott and Steffen Bartsch

This paper aims to discuss large‐scale operational aspects for network service maps and to present technical solutions and evaluation results.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss large‐scale operational aspects for network service maps and to present technical solutions and evaluation results.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews related work on service discovery specifically for wireless networks and services in, introduces network service maps and their operation in detail and describes their implementation and addresses two specific usage scenarios, based upon which it evaluates its approach through measurements and simulations.

Findings

The paper finds that, in the presence of today's ever‐increasing WLAN services, better support for service selection and automated service configuration is an urgent need to enable people to access these new services efficiently and thus increase their value and utilisation further. This is clearly reflected in different solutions being developed by service providers, roaming operators and device manufacturers that aim to facilitate WLAN usage.

Originality/value

The ubiquity of WLAN services, ranging from campus networks to commercial hotspots and community WLAN services, requires a new approach for automatically locating and using services. The paper presents a service selection infrastructure that is independent of a user's current network attachment and location in a way that users can obtain information of a specific network (or any other service) without being required to be connected to a particular one. Information about networks and services are distributed in a way that allows for using this information offline, e.g. when still looking for appropriate network access.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

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