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Article
Publication date: 10 November 2020

Libo Yan and Man Tat Cheng

The aim of this study is to explore the host–guest relationship at a macro level, investigating the sociopsychological relationship between a destination and its markets.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to explore the host–guest relationship at a macro level, investigating the sociopsychological relationship between a destination and its markets.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted netnography to fulfill the research purpose. Data were collected from Sina Microblog, the predominant social media platform in China, focused on bloggers responses to a fatal conflict between a tour participant and the guide during a shopping tour.

Findings

Bloggers' attributional discussions help to understand the nature of the host–guest relations. Responses from Chinese and Hong Kong bloggers showcased criticism toward the other community and criticism of one's own community. These were reflected in three themes: concerns with the place of conflict or the identities of the perpetrators, hospitableness or discrimination and the Chinese and Hong Kong cultures.

Research limitations/implications

The major limitation is that the subject of this study (young bloggers) does not represent a complete cross section of the residents of China and Hong Kong. This study suggests a need for a broader theoretical perspective of the host–guest encounter. The study results have practical implications for destinations receiving Chinese group package tours.

Practical implications

The study results have practical implications for destinations receiving Chinese group package tours.

Originality/value

On-site interaction has been the focus of previous studies of the host–guest relationship, and off-site interactions were seldom explored. This study bridges the gap and extends the discourse on the host–guest relationship to a wider temporal (by taking a post event view) and spatial (by assessing the issue off-site) scale.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Xiaoqing Chen

This paper aims to analyse the conceptual bases of the related terms of “host” and “guest” in Chinese and reveal essential, though overlooked, cultural differences that…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyse the conceptual bases of the related terms of “host” and “guest” in Chinese and reveal essential, though overlooked, cultural differences that relate to “hospitality” in Western and Chinese cultural contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

A presupposition of this conceptual investigation is that culture manifests itself linguistically. The analytic approach used here is textual analysis. Confucian classical texts are the main source of evidence for examining the conceptual commitments of the Chinese characters 主 and 客 and their corresponding practical expressions.

Findings

Cross-cultural comparison reveals asymmetries between the term “hospitality” and its Chinese translations, etymologically and culturally. This study demonstrates how the Chinese 主–客 paradigm is both hierarchal in nature and centred on the role and interests of the host. It further compares this paradigm with its Western counterpart along five different dimensions.

Research limitations/implications

The specific Chinese norms for the host–guest paradigm synthesized here could prompt both academicians and operators to question the cultural attachments associated with hospitality by participants and the cultural differences in hospitality transactions and management. The cultural sensitivity modelled here is intended to facilitate harmony between a hospitality setting and the culture in which it is embedded.

Originality/value

This conceptual paper is the first in the Anglophone literature to explore the Chinese cultural roots of the concepts “host” and “guest”. The linguistic perspective used in this study allows the concept of “hospitality” to be studied cross-culturally and in an interdisciplinary way, addressing a blind spot in the extant hospitality literature.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2007

Hazel Andrews, Les Roberts and Tom Selwyn

This paper aims to provoke discussion and reflection on the role of the erotic in the cultivation of spaces of hospitality, and to provide a theoretical consideration of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provoke discussion and reflection on the role of the erotic in the cultivation of spaces of hospitality, and to provide a theoretical consideration of the structural similarities of hospitality and eroticism.

Design/methodology/approach

With reference to classical studies as well as debates in the social science literature, the paper starts by examining some of the theoretical and philosophical underpinnings to hospitality and eroticism. It then develops this analysis by considering examples drawn from ethnographic studies of “traditional” hospitality settings as well as of commercial hospitality environments of charter tourism.

Findings

The main outcome of the discussion is to demonstrate the structural relations between hospitality and eroticism. By situating the analysis within a broad theoretical and ethnographic context, it is shown that the erotic has historically functioned as a socially‐binding and communicative mode of social intercourse that, while undermined by the demands of a market‐based culture of commercial hospitality, is also able to flourish within these same adverse conditions.

Research limitations/implications

This paper invites further research into the connections between hospitality and eroticism in settings similar to and different from those described in the paper. A fuller ethnographic study of the relationship between the two is needed, as well as an exploration of more theoretical perspectives on hospitality drawn from the social science literature.

Practical implications

By highlighting the socially binding role of eroticism in the structuring of host‐guest relations, the paper draws on and contributes to a broader politics of love and sensuality that will inform critical reflections on commercial and market‐driven hospitality practices.

Originality/value

This paper provides an original insight into the interrelationship between hospitality and eroticism. It further illuminates previous writings on both subjects but particularly that of eroticism and is supported by empirical data. It is of particular interest to those studying hospitality from a social science perspective.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Daniel Carvalho de Rezende and Matheus Alberto Rodrigues Silva

The purpose of this paper is to describe generic eating out experiences that can be provided by commercial eating out establishments, presenting a typology of experience…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe generic eating out experiences that can be provided by commercial eating out establishments, presenting a typology of experience providers.

Design/methodology/approach

The research carried out sought to make an understanding of the experiential environments in which eating-out is performed, as well as the experiences that it seeks to produce, and was conducted from a market-orientated ethnography in selected markets from the UK and Brazil.

Findings

Six ideal models of service providers, according to the main characteristics of the stimulus provided by the service encounter, were identified: authentic, relaxed, “all you can eat”, “as home”, efficient and distinction environment. The diversity of food service environments is somehow an answer to the diversity of customers and expectations regarding eating-out. The access of different social classes to eating-out opens the space for more variety, and the creativity that food service managers have on building an appropriate set of stimulus, is a distinctive skill.

Research limitations/implications

The restaurant side of experience encounters was the focus of analysis, but for a deeper understanding of experiential consumption on eating out these results must be confronted to consumer research based on psychophysical methods to assess consumer responses to eating out.

Originality/value

Theoretical implications of this paper rely on the understanding that there are distinct forms of service encounters, providing an alternative view of servicescapes that allows a better understanding of business strategies and host-guest relationships on food service.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 116 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2010

Brent Moyle, Glen Croy and Betty Weiler

The purpose of this paper is to explore the cultural interaction between communities and visitors to islands using social exchange theory to enhance the understanding of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the cultural interaction between communities and visitors to islands using social exchange theory to enhance the understanding of the island experience.

Design/methodology/approach

The method consisted of 30 in‐depth interviews with community and tourism stakeholders, and formed part of a multi‐phase study that used social exchange theory as the lens to illuminate a range of perspectives of island interaction. This paper presents a comparative case study of Bruny Island in Tasmania, and Magnetic Island in Queensland, Australia.

Findings

Findings revealed that local community members have a wide range of motivations for entering into social exchanges with visitors, ranging from solely economic, to a genuine desire to provide quality experiences. Additionally, findings showed the nature of island cultural interaction could vary immensely, from welcoming and meaningful exchanges through to superficial and even hostile contact.

Research limitations/implications

As this research is on two islands in Australia, within a particular timeframe, the results may not be representative of island communities generally. Nonetheless, the results are indicative of locals' perceptions of their interactions with visitors.

Practical implications

The findings have a range of practical implications for the management of local and visitor interaction on islands. A key implication for island communities is the importance of developing programs that educate and inform locals about the potential benefits of interaction. Additionally, this research illustrates how islands can use cultural interaction to differentiate their tourism product and market island experiences.

Originality/value

The paper's contribution is its use of social exchange theory at a micro‐level to illuminate a range of local community members' perspectives of their tourism exchanges, in order to enhance understanding of the complex process of interaction between locals and visitors to islands.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2021

Dominik Huber and Sven Gross

The purpose of this study is to increase the understanding of how local residents in tourism destinations perceive their role in the creation of tourist experiences.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to increase the understanding of how local residents in tourism destinations perceive their role in the creation of tourist experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative research was conducted with 16 local residents in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, a tourism hotspot in Germany. The study used thematic analysis combined with qualitative content analysis to identify various themes associated with host–guest-based tourist experience creation.

Findings

Findings demonstrate how diverse local residents contribute to tourist experiences. A model was developed that suggests a distinction between active and passive contribution to tourist experiences. Only little evidence was found that the concept of co-creation plays a role in host–guest relationships, which contradicts other literature.

Research limitations/implications

The chosen qualitative research approach does not allow for generalisation of the research findings. The examination of perceptions raises epistemological questions.

Practical implications

This paper includes implications for improved internal marketing strategies and the involvement of local residents in tourism destination development.

Originality/value

This study contributes to knowledge by conceptualizing the role of local residents in tourist experience creation. The paper closes research gaps by using a qualitative study design in Germany to explore the underlying conditions that affect host–guest encounters to the discussion of tourist experience creation. Research findings may be adapted to other geographical or cultural settings with similar levels of tourism development.

当地居民对旅游体验的贡献:从德国加米施·帕滕基兴社区视角入手研究方法

本文对来自德国热门旅游景点加米施·帕滕基兴的16名当地居民进行了定性研究。本研究采用主题分析与定性内容分析相结合的方法, 探究与创造主客旅游体验相关的各个主题。

研究目的

本研究旨在探索旅游地居民如何感知自身在旅游体验创造中的作用。

研究结果

研究结果表明不同当地居民对旅游体验的贡献。本文通过建立模型, 表明旅游体验的主动贡献和被动贡献之间的显著区别。与其他文献相矛盾的是, 只有很少的证据表明共创的概念在主客关系中起到了一定作用。

研究局限性

本研究所选择的定性研究方法无法对研究结果进行概括总结。对知觉的考察提出了认识论的问题。

实践意义

本文提出了对改进内部营销策略和当地居民参与旅游目的地发展的一些启示。

研究价值

本研究的理论贡献在于概念化的提出本地居民在旅游体验创造中的作用。本研究采用定性研究方法探索影响主客接触的潜在条件, 从而探讨旅游体验的创造, 填补研究空白。本文研究结果同样适用于其他相似旅游发展水平的地理或文化环境。

La contribución de los residentes locales a las experiencias turísticas: Una perspectiva comunitaria desde Garmisch-Partenkirchen, alemaniaDiseño/metodología/enfoque

Se llevó a cabo una investigación cualitativa con 16 residentes locales en Garmisch-Partenkirchen, un lugar turístico de Alemania. En el estudio se utilizó un análisis temático combinado con un análisis de contenido cualitativo para identificar diversos temas relacionados con la creación de experiencias turísticas por parte de los anfitriones.

Propósito

El objetivo de este estudio exploratorio es aumentar la comprensión de cómo los residentes locales de los destinos turísticos perciben su papel en la creación de experiencias turísticas.

Hallazgos

Los hallazgos demuestran cómo los diversos residentes locales contribuyen a las experiencias turísticas. Se elaboró un modelo que sugiere una distinción entre la contribución activa y pasiva a las experiencias turísticas. Se encontraron pocas pruebas de que el concepto de co-creación desempeñe un papel en las relaciones anfitrión-huésped, lo que contradice otras publicaciones.

Limitaciones/implicaciones de la investigación

El enfoque de investigación cualitativa elegido no permite generalizar los resultados de la investigación. El examen de las percepciones plantea cuestiones epistemológicas.

Implicaciones prácticas

Este documento incluye las implicaciones para mejorar las estrategias de comercialización interna y la participación de los residentes locales en el desarrollo de los destinos turísticos.

Originalidad/valor

Este estudio contribuye al conocimiento al conceptualizar el papel de los residentes locales en la creación de experiencias turísticas. El documento cubree ciertas lagunas de la investigación utilizando un diseño de estudio cualitativo para explorar las condiciones subyacentes que afectan a los encuentros entre huéspedes y anfitriones para el debate sobre la creación de experiencias turísticas. Las conclusiones de la investigación pueden adaptarse a otros entornos geográficos o culturales con niveles similares de desarrollo turístico.

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2017

Jin Young Chung

The present study aims to clarify how online friendships between local residents and tourists are made in a hospitality exchange network, one of the not-for-profit sharing…

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aims to clarify how online friendships between local residents and tourists are made in a hospitality exchange network, one of the not-for-profit sharing economy platforms. Specifically, the study empirically examines three topics: the properties of dyadic relationships in the platform; the effect of face-to-face interactions on online friendships in the platform; and the role of locals in building host-guest relationships in the hospitality exchange network.

Design/methodology/approach

Social networks data in CouchSurfing.org were collected and analyzed using a social network analysis (SNA) program. Along with the descriptive analysis of the actors in the online hospitality network, several SNA indicators, including the degree of centrality, density and centralization, were measured to explore the nature of the network and identify the gatekeepers.

Findings

Findings suggest that latent ties between tourists and hosts are likely to be manifested through face-to-face events. In particular, local people play central roles in establishing host-guest relationships.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the body of knowledge on the sharing economy in hospitality by synthesizing two areas in the literature, the host-guest framework and the online hospitality networks.

Originality/value

The social psychological aspects of the sharing economy have yet to receive attention from hospitality scholars. In addition, studies have largely focused on profit-driven models in the sharing economy (e.g. Airbnb). This study fills this gap by examining the host and guest behavior empirically in one of the not-for-profit hospitality sharing economy platforms.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 29 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Robert Charles Capistrano and Adam Weaver

This paper aims to examine the social interactions between Filipino immigrant-hosts residing in New Zealand and their visiting relatives (VRs) or guests from the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the social interactions between Filipino immigrant-hosts residing in New Zealand and their visiting relatives (VRs) or guests from the Philippines using social exchange theory to understand their experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative, multi-sited study used in-depth interviews to examine social interactions between Filipino immigrant-host families in New Zealand and their respective visiting relatives from the Philippines.

Findings

Hosting VRs reflects aspects of social exchange theory, and the interdependence and familial obligations related to VR travel demonstrate mutual relations of care. Maintaining relations of care within the family is an ongoing process involving intergenerational relationships that bind together immigrant-host families and their VRs.

Research limitations/implications

The conceptualization of the social interactions between immigrants-hosts and VRs is not generalizable owing to the small sample size and lack of representativeness. However, despite a small sample, this qualitative inquiry uncovered a series of personal meanings and understandings attached to the maintenance of familial bonds.

Practical implications

As immigrant-receiving countries become more culturally diverse through migration, research about other cultures will assist tourism planners in understanding the values and actions of a more varied array of residents. A better understanding of travel experiences and interactions between immigrants and their guests may provide marketers with insights into host-guest dynamics within a VR context, thus potentially enabling tourism marketers to create better marketing campaigns.

Social implications

Future studies may be undertaken from non-Western and Western perspectives that examine the social interactions between hosts and guests in the context of VR travel. Very little research has been conducted that addresses the meanings and understandings attached to these interactions from the perspectives of both hosting and visiting groups. This research highlights the importance of families in tourism, a contrast with the relative blindness of tourism scholarship toward relations of domesticity and sociality.

Originality/value

What separates the social interactions between family members in the context of visiting friends and relatives travel from the traditional host-guest paradigm is that it does not involve strangers. This study uses social exchange theory to examine social interactions between hosts and guests who are familiar with each other.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Allan Ramdhony and Norma D’Annunzio-Green

The purpose of this paper is to consider how the talent of hospitableness can be transposed to commercial settings without a wholesale erosion of its altruistic and moral…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider how the talent of hospitableness can be transposed to commercial settings without a wholesale erosion of its altruistic and moral core and how it can be effectively leveraged within the talent management (TM) process.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors unpack the concept of hospitableness which entails an unconditional disposition and moral obligation in the host to care for their guest. This paper also exposes its moral dilemmas and the risks it presents to both host and guest – leading to the endorsement of reciprocal altruistic hospitableness which warrants altruistic sentiments and moral obligations in both parties as the necessary condition for a more protective, mutually beneficial and enduring host–guest relationship. Against the backdrop of the tourism and hospitality industry, this paper examines the challenges of transposing hospitableness to commercial settings without a wholesale erosion of its altruistic and moral core. It posits that what is needed is a reframing of TM as a dialogic process through which hospitableness can be effectively leveraged as a unique talent.

Findings

In carrying out this exercise, this paper develops a conceptual framework that brings the TM process under the overarching principle of free dialogue – which the authors see as a precondition for preserving the altruistic and moral core of hospitableness even when transposed to commercial settings.

Practical implications

The framework contains concrete guidelines on how to reframe TM as dialogic practice and can be used as a canvas for experimentation in managing the talent of hospitableness and for training purposes.

Originality/value

The paper expands the conceptual dimensions of hospitableness and deepens understanding of its application via the TM process to commercial settings.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2013

Ning Li and William H. Murphy

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between consumers' alliance encounter satisfaction (AES) and their behavioral intentions toward standalone…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between consumers' alliance encounter satisfaction (AES) and their behavioral intentions toward standalone platforms of host and guest partners, and the moderating effects of consumer AES attributions on AES-to-behavioral intention relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper extends attribution theory and satisfaction literature to the brand alliance context. The study used 1,470 survey responses from consumers, each having had purchase experiences with one of 16 brand alliances, to test hypotheses.

Findings

AES spills over to favorable behavioral intentions toward each alliance partner as a standalone brand. This spillover effect is strengthened by a carryover effect. Intriguingly, if a partner outshines the other and solely receives AES attributions, there is a significant contrast effect adversely affecting the spillover effect for the non-attributed partner.

Practical implications

The findings provide advice on partner selection and alliance resource commitments. Choosing partners well and working synergistically to attain AES is essential for gaining behavioral intention uplift for alliance partners. Brand managers are advised to select partners with comparable rather than superior capabilities. Also, since outcomes of alliance encounters lead to greater gains (or losses) for host brands, hosts are called to be particularly thorough when making alliance resource commitments.

Originality/value

There are few studies of actual consumer experiences with alliances, since most consumer-focused alliance research uses experimental designs. This paper is among the first to examine the effects of actual consumer alliance encounters on behavioral intentions toward each alliance partner as a standalone firm.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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