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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2011

Jeffrey P. Harrison and Emily D. Ferguson

Emergency services are critical for high‐quality healthcare service provision to support acute illness, trauma and disaster response. The greater availability of emergency

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Abstract

Purpose

Emergency services are critical for high‐quality healthcare service provision to support acute illness, trauma and disaster response. The greater availability of emergency services decreases waiting time, improves clinical outcomes and enhances local community well being. This study aims to assess United States (US) acute care hospital staff's ability to provide emergency medical services by evaluating the number of emergency departments and trauma centers.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained from the 2003 and 2007 American Hospital Association (AHA) annual surveys, which included over 5,000 US hospitals and provided extensive information on their infrastructure and healthcare capabilities.

Findings

US acute care hospital numbers decreased by 59 or 1.1 percent from 2003 to 2007. Similarly, US emergency rooms and trauma centers declined by 125, or 3 percent. The results indicate that US hospital staff's ability to respond to traumatic injury and disasters has declined. Therefore, US hospital managers need to increase their investment in emergency department beds as well as provide state‐of‐the‐art clinical technology to improve emergency service quality. These investments, when linked to other clinical information systems and the electronic medical record, support further healthcare quality improvement.

Research limitations/implications

This research uses the AHA annual surveys, which represent self‐reported data by individual hospital staff. However, the AHA expends significant resources to validate reported information and the annual survey data are widely used for hospital research.

Practical implications

The declining US emergency rooms and trauma centers have negative implications for patients needing emergency services. More importantly, this research has significant policy implications because it documents a decline in the US emergency healthcare service infrastructure.

Originality/value

This article has important information on US emergency service availability in the hospital industry.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 November 2018

Shamsuddin Ahmed and Addas F. Mohammed

Accident emergency hospital (AEH) services require cohesive, collective, uninterrupted streamlined medical diagnostic and satisfactory patient care. Medical service

Abstract

Purpose

Accident emergency hospital (AEH) services require cohesive, collective, uninterrupted streamlined medical diagnostic and satisfactory patient care. Medical service efficiency in AEHs is difficult to quantify due to the clinical complexity involved in treatment involving various units, patient conditions, changes in contemporary medical practices and technological developments. This paper aims to show how to measure efficiency by eliminating waste in AEH system, identify service failure points, identify benchmark medical services, identify patient throughput time and measure treatment time when AEH services are nonstandard. The applications shown in this paper are distinct in particular; we the authors use nontraditional and systems engineering approach to collect data as the traditional data collection is difficult in real-time AEHs.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors show in this study how to measure overall patient treatment time from admission to discharge. Project evaluation and review technique (PERT) captures the inconsistencies involved in measuring treatment time, including measures of variability. The irregular treatment time and complexity involved in the emergency health-care services are usual. The research methodology illustrates how the time function map and service blueprint can improve value-added time in AEHs and benchmark services between similar AEHs.

Findings

The inconsistency in treatment time between AEH in public and private hospital is found to be in ratio of 1:20. The private hospital suggests variety of treatments and long stays for recovery. The PERT computations show that the average time a patient remains in a government AEH is about 10 days. The standard deviation of the AEH treatment time is about 0.043 per cent of the expected patient care time. The inconsistency is not significant as compared to the expected value. In 89.64 per cent of the cases, a patient may be discharged in less than 10 days’ time. The patient on average is discharged in 13 days in a private hospital.

Originality/value

The patient treatment time of an AEH is evaluated with PERT project management approach to account for inconsistencies in treatment time. This research makes new contributions in benchmarking AEH throughput time, identify medical service failure points with service blueprint, measure the efficiency with time function map and collect patient data with nontraditional methods. The inherent inconsistencies in a clinical process are identified by PERT analysis with the variance as a characteristic of the treatment time. Improvement of variability implies cost reduction in AEH system.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Charlie Labarda, Meredith Del Pilar Labarda and Exaltacion Ellevera Lamberte

Resilient health facilities, particularly hospitals, are critical for a responsive local health system in post-disaster settings. The purpose of this paper is to look at…

Abstract

Purpose

Resilient health facilities, particularly hospitals, are critical for a responsive local health system in post-disaster settings. The purpose of this paper is to look at the experiences of two hospitals (public and private) in Tacloban City, Philippines in the aftermath of a super typhoon and their respective delivery of health services in such setting.

Design/methodology/approach

It described the impact of Typhoon Haiyan on health services delivery capacity and the factors instrumental in the resilience of the case hospitals. Lessons learned from the hospitals’ experiences, both at the level of the hospital staff and the institution, were also drawn. Disaster preparedness of case hospitals were assessed along several domains of resilience. Key informant interviews among stakeholders were conducted with key themes on disaster resilience extracted.

Findings

Disaster preparedness scores for case hospitals were different from each other and were reflected in their experiences of health services delivery in the aftermath of the disaster.

Research limitations/implications

This study on hospital resilience of two case hospitals, in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan, is exploratory in nature. The retrospective design of the study made it prone to recall bias. Further, the use of self-report measures for hospital resilience needs to be validated by more objective measures. The lack of baseline pre-disaster resilience indicators and the unpredictability of disasters could perhaps be addressed by a longitudinal study on hospital resilience in disasters in the future.

Originality/value

This study revealed several key findings. Some of the themes that emerged were: public health in disaster is the responsibility of both public and private hospitals; need for flexibility in disaster preparedness and planning, disaster resilience is an emergent process not a static construct, chaos results from zeal without coordination, and the need for integration of disaster preparedness in daily processes and structures of hospital facilities.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Hong Qin, Gayle L. Prybutok, Victor R. Prybutok and Bin Wang

The purpose of this paper is to develop, validate, and use a survey instrument to measure and compare the perceived quality of three types of US urgent care (UC) service

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop, validate, and use a survey instrument to measure and compare the perceived quality of three types of US urgent care (UC) service providers: hospital emergency rooms, urgent care centres (UCC), and primary care physician offices.

Design/methodology/approach

This study develops, validates, and uses a survey instrument to measure/compare differences in perceived service quality among three types of UC service providers. Six dimensions measured the components of service quality: tangibles, professionalism, interaction, accessibility, efficiency, and technical quality.

Findings

Primary care physicians’ offices scored higher for service quality and perceived value, followed by UCC. Hospital emergency rooms scored lower in both quality and perceived value. No significant difference was identified between UCC and primary care physicians across all the perspectives, except for interactions.

Research limitations/implications

The homogenous nature of the sample population (college students), and the fact that the respondents were recruited from a single university limits the generalizability of the findings.

Practical implications

The patient’s choice of a health care provider influences not only the continuity of the care that he or she receives, but compliance with a medical regime, and the evolution of the health care landscape.

Social implications

This work contributes to the understanding of how to provide cost effective and efficient UC services.

Originality/value

This study developed and validated a survey instrument to measure/compare six dimensions of service quality for three types of UC service providers. The authors provide valuable data for UC service providers seeking to improve patient perceptions of service quality.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 July 2007

Russell Linwood, Gary Day, Gerrard FitzGerald and Brian Oldenburg

The purpose of this article to review the literature relating to improving paramedic care in an Australian context.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article to review the literature relating to improving paramedic care in an Australian context.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents changes and challenges that have occurred in the ambulance services in terms of improving care and measuring performance, exploring the literature on quality improvement initiatives and their application to pre‐hospital care.

Findings

While hospitals and health services have moved well down the quality improvement pathway, the application of these processes to pre‐hospital care has been a relatively recent phenomenon. Ambulance services have taken a variety of approaches to measuring and improving pre‐hospital care. This article questions the transferability of lessons learned in hospitals to ambulance services. Arguably, the quality improvement approach is dependent upon health control and funding models and where ambulance is categorised in terms of health or emergency services.

Originality/value

The quality improvement approach by Australian paramedics and ambulance services is in its infancy. This article provides insights into the quality improvement approach taken by ambulance staff in Australia compared to other countries, as well as highlighting useful information on the future direction and research into the area.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 20 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 May 2020

Avichai Shuv-Ami and Tamar Shalom

Service quality and patient satisfaction have a significant impact in healthcare. Health organizations have also begun to put the customer at the center and meet his or…

Abstract

Purpose

Service quality and patient satisfaction have a significant impact in healthcare. Health organizations have also begun to put the customer at the center and meet his or her needs. This study aims to indicate the need to develop a simple and appropriate scale for measuring quality of service in hospital emergency rooms.

Design/methodology/approach

The validity and reliability of the scale were established by three separated and independent studies that used exploratory factor analysis, confirmatory factor analysis and correlation analysis to test the nomological network validity of the scale. The data was collected randomly from an internet panel that comprises more than 50,000 people over the age of 18. The research is based on 1,002 Israelis who accompanied a patient to a hospital emergency room.

Findings

In total, 23 items comprised the new scale of emergency room service quality with three dimensions: “staff professionalism”, “staff caring” and “tangibles”. The internal reliability for the total scale was high with Cronbach's α of 0.97.

Research limitations/implications

In Israel, there is a state health system, and therefore, it is necessary to check the scale elsewhere in the world.

Originality/value

The measurement of service quality for emergency room needed to be focused on the unique charters of the service provided in hospitalsemergency room. The findings show that a client may assesses the service their loved one has received to decides whether to return to the same hospital and recommend it to his or her friends.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2021

Mohaddese Omidi, Behzad Zohrevandi and Enayatollah Homaie Rad

As a human right, people need to arrive early at the hospitals when they are injured in traffic accidents. Both the mean and equality of the time of arriving at the…

Abstract

Purpose

As a human right, people need to arrive early at the hospitals when they are injured in traffic accidents. Both the mean and equality of the time of arriving at the hospital are important. This study aimed to investigate inequality in arrival time of emergent traffic accident patients to the hospital in 2018–2019 in a city in the North of Iran.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors extracted the data from the Guilan province trauma system databank in Poursina Hospital in Rasht in 2018 and 2019. The Gini coefficient was used to calculate inequality, and a regression model was estimated for determining the reason for inequality in time to receive hospital services.

Findings

The study showed that patients’ arrival time from the time of the accident to the time of arrival to the hospital was 64.48 ± 47.63 min (minimum of 9 min and maximum 462 min). Gini coefficient was 0.31 (p <0.001), which does not show high inequality. Regression results showed that the transfer time of patients by car was 40 min longer (p-value <0.001) than ambulances (p = 0.036). In children, the transfer time was 42 min less (p = 0.003). Other variables did not explain the inequality (p > 0.05).

Originality/value

According to the time of arrival of patients and Gini index, in Rasht, inequality in providing services is not in a bad condition. This indicates that the emergency department does not systematically transport people to the hospital late.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Avichai Shuv-Ami and Tamar Shalom

The purpose of this paper is to test three visual, demographically based perceptions of service quality at several emergency rooms (ERs) of hospital organizations in Israel.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test three visual, demographically based perceptions of service quality at several emergency rooms (ERs) of hospital organizations in Israel.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is based on the evaluations of 1,002 people who accompanied a patient to hospital ERs in Israel. The data were collected randomly from an internet panel that comprised more than 50,000 people aged over 18 years.

Findings

The findings showed that female patients were perceived as receiving significantly lower service quality than males; elderly patients were treated well by medical staff, and treatment was similar to all other adult groups; children were perceived as receiving the best service; and religious individuals perceived service quality in ERs at a higher level than non-religious patients.

Research limitations/implications

The current study uses a service quality scale derived from a marketing scale that was modified to study the quality of service in hospital ERs. The current study measures only differences in visual demographics.

Originality/value

This paper attempts to provide the ER staff of hospital organizations with some knowledge about the ways which their service is perceived and encourages a more sensitive attitude toward their patients’ needs. This may influence the hospital customer satisfaction and the hospital financial bottom-line.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Mohammed Mesabbah and Amr Arisha

Performance Management (PM) processes have become a potent part of strategic and service quality decisions in healthcare organisations. In 2005, the management of public…

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Abstract

Purpose

Performance Management (PM) processes have become a potent part of strategic and service quality decisions in healthcare organisations. In 2005, the management of public healthcare in Ireland was amalgamated into a single integrated management body, named the Health Service Executive (HSE). Since then, the HSE has come up with a range of strategies for healthcare developments and reforms, and has developed a PM system as part of its strategic planning. The purpose of this paper is to review the application of PM in the Irish Healthcare system, with a particular focus on Irish Hospitals and Emergency Services.

Design/methodology/approach

An extensive review of relevant HSE’s publications from 2005 to 2013 is conducted. Studies of the relevant literature related to the application of PM and of international best practices in healthcare performance systems are also presented.

Findings

PM and performance measurement systems used by the HSE include many performance reports designed to monitor performance trends and strategic goals. Issues in the current PM system include inconsistency of measures and performance reporting, unclear strategy alignment, and deficiencies in reporting (e.g. feedback and corrective actions). Furthermore, PM processes have not been linked adequately into Irish public hospitals’ management systems.

Research limitations/implications

The HSE delivers several services such as mental health, social inclusion, etc. This study focuses on the HSE’s PM framework, with a particular interest in acute hospitals and emergency services.

Originality/value

This is the first comprehensive review of Irish healthcare PM since the introduction of the HSE. A critical analysis of the HSE reports identifies the shortcomings in its current PM system.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Handbook of Road Safety Measures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-250-0

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