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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Verl Anderson, Ken Kalala Ndalamba and Cam Caldwell

Social responsibility (SR) in accepting the obligation to resolve the many troubling problems facing tomorrow’s generations is essential if those problems are to be…

Abstract

Purpose

Social responsibility (SR) in accepting the obligation to resolve the many troubling problems facing tomorrow’s generations is essential if those problems are to be effectively addressed. The purpose of this paper is to identify the nature of SR for business, academic institutions, government, religious institutions, and individuals.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a conceptual paper which relies heavily on the current literature about social obligations for five major organizations: business, academic institutions, government, religious institutions, and individuals.

Findings

The paper provides the standard of the virtuous continuum and the Hosmer decision-making model to explain why leaders, organizations, and individuals must be more responsible to be perceived as virtuous leaders, complete with 50 examples of action to be taken.

Research limitations/implications

As this paper is not an empirical study, it does not present research information.

Practical implications

This paper suggests that organizations can be more effective if they come to understand the responsibilities and stewardship of social responsibilities entrusted to them.

Originality/value

The paper expands on Hosmer’s research and incorporates a virtuous continuum in examining the responsibilities of leaders, organizations, and individuals. More importantly, this paper is among the first to identify specific steps organizations and individuals can take in addressing the challenges and problems facing the world of in key aspects of society.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Charmine E.J. Härtel and Deshani B. Ganegoda

In an age where morality requires economic justification, it is a compelling task to explicate the deeper affecting implications of moral judgment than its mere financial…

Abstract

In an age where morality requires economic justification, it is a compelling task to explicate the deeper affecting implications of moral judgment than its mere financial costs. In this chapter, we explore the emotional, behavioral, and cognitive ramifications of moral leadership at both the individual and macro organizational levels; specifically, by summoning literature on leadership, affect, and organizational justice to build a conceptual model of affect and interactional justice in moral leadership. The aim of the model is to extend current theoretical frameworks and highlight the important ramifications that moral decision-making has on employee and organizational welfare including that of the decision maker. The chapter concludes with a call for research comparing moral and immoral leadership in terms of different influence and strategy processes adopted by leaders and their followers’ attributions, emotions, attitudes, and behaviors.

Details

Emotions, Ethics and Decision-Making
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84663-941-8

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2018

Sarah Sanders Smith, Samuel L. Rohr and Richard N. Panton

Human resource professionals (HRPs) remain challenged by ethical conundrums in the workplace. Business leaders are asked to respond to demands for efficiency in an…

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2947

Abstract

Purpose

Human resource professionals (HRPs) remain challenged by ethical conundrums in the workplace. Business leaders are asked to respond to demands for efficiency in an environment of distrust or skepticism amongst employees and customers. HRPs who understand ethical decision-making as well as ethical perspectives and implications of actions within the organization can create value within their organizations. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the five ethical content issues of Hosmer’s (1987) model related to the twenty-first century human resource management (HRM) themes.

Design/methodology/approach

As a result of a syntheses of leadership and HRM philosophies over several decades, six propositions associated with the content issues are suggested.

Findings

HRPs are well-positioned to encourage ethical and moral decision-making within their organizations when they are able to contribute to creation of a culture that honors duties to stakeholders and supports organizational success.

Originality/value

The existence of synthesized analysis regarding organizational leaders, human resource managers, ethics and culture to build organizational success is limited. Thus, this paper highlights a need for organizations and for HRPs to dedicate policies and implement practices which can support ethical sustenance in today’s organizations.

Details

International Journal of Public Leadership, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4929

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-239-9

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Mahdi Moardi, Mahdi Salehi and Zakiyeh Marandi

This paper aims to investigate the role of affect and tolerance of ambiguity on ethical decision-making of management and accounting students.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the role of affect and tolerance of ambiguity on ethical decision-making of management and accounting students.

Design/methodology/approach

Weisbrod’s (2009) questionnaire on ethical decision-making in individual and organizational situations, McDonald’s (1970)16-factor questionnaire on tolerance of ambiguity and Watson et al.’s (1988) Positive and Negative Affect Schedule were used to study the students’ views toward research hypotheses. The population used in this study includes graduate and PhD students of accounting and management during the academic year 2014-2015. The number of samples is 398 and sample members selected using simple random sampling method. Hypotheses test using structural equation modeling in the AMOS software version 18.

Findings

Results of hypotheses shows that individual characteristics of positive and negative affect and tolerance of ambiguity have no effect on accounting students’ ethical decision-making, but there is a significant positive relationship between management students’ negative affect and ethical decision-making, and a significant negative relationship between management students’ increased level of tolerance of ambiguity and ethical decision-making. The findings also show that affect (positive and negative) and tolerance of ambiguity have no interactive effect on accounting students’ ethical decision-making, whereas among students of management, there is a significant relationship between interactive effect of negative affect and tolerance of ambiguity on ethical decision-making. The results show that there is a significant difference between students of management and accounting based on negative effects and tolerance of ambiguity on ethical decision-making.

Originality/value

The current paper is almost the first paper which was conducted in developing countries.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

E. Frank Harrison and Monique A. Pelletier

The purpose of this article is to extend and reinforce previous research intended to demonstrate that a process model of decision making is conducive to strategic decision…

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5077

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to extend and reinforce previous research intended to demonstrate that a process model of decision making is conducive to strategic decision success. Using a strategic decision matrix with a two‐dimensional focus, 16 high‐visibility strategic decisions from different corporations in the 1990s are evaluated and classified to support the hypothesis that a formal decision‐making process is conducive to successful strategic decision outcomes. The results of this evaluation clearly indicate that, in the absence of a managerial decision‐making process, successful outcomes are unlikely to materialize. Conversely, although a process‐oriented approach to strategic choice affords no guarantee of a successful outcome, the likelihood of this occurrence tends to increase with this approach. This revisiting of strategic decision success confirms earlier research in this critical area. Hopefully, it will elicit subsequent research of a similar nature.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 15 January 2018

Vincent Bruni-Bossio

This paper aims to offer a solution to the dilemma of board members using their personal values to drive decision-making and strategy. Board members are asked to discuss…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to offer a solution to the dilemma of board members using their personal values to drive decision-making and strategy. Board members are asked to discuss the collective values at the onset of strategy planning.

Design/methodology/approach

Six questions, developed over a 15-year period of working in the area of strategy and governance, unite research on values in organizations, and provide a guide for arriving at a set of agreed-upon values for decision-making.

Findings

Two examples from practice showcase how agreeing on values before beginning the strategy process has assisted boards with better decision-making.

Research limitations/implications

The questions and process are meant to be a reflective tool for board members to consider when discussing values and decision-making rather than predicting behaviour or explaining outcomes. The process is most effective for boards whose culture supports a desire for improvement and therefore a willingness to experiment with new processes. The process can be enhanced by using an external facilitator having the ability to extrapolate meaning as the discussion unfolds.

Practical implications

This work empowers board members to be more effective in assessing strategic options and in communicating the inner logic and meaning of the strategy throughout the organization and to the external stakeholders.

Originality/value

Advocating that boards engage in focused discussion around values at the beginning of the strategic process improves decision-making and provides a litmus test for evaluating the strategic options. Agreeing on a set of values also makes board members more aware of the implications of each option in the long term.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Yuka Fujimoto, Charmine E.J. Härtel and Fara Azmat

Contemporary organizations are increasingly paying attention to incorporate diversity management practices into their systems in order to promote socially responsible…

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3967

Abstract

Purpose

Contemporary organizations are increasingly paying attention to incorporate diversity management practices into their systems in order to promote socially responsible actions and equitable employment outcomes for minority groups. The aim of this paper is to seek to address a major oversight in diversity management literature, the integration of organizational justice principles.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing upon the existing literature on workforce diversity and organizational justice, the authors develop a model based on normative principles of organizational justice for justice‐based diversity management processes and outcomes.

Findings

The paper proposes that effective diversity management results from a decision‐making process that meets the normative principles of organizational justice (i.e. interactional, procedural and distributive justice). The diversity justice management model introduced in this article provides important theoretical and practical implications for establishing more moral and just workplaces.

Research limitations/implications

The authors have not tested the conceptual framework of the diversity justice management model, and recommend future research to take up the challenge. The payoff for doing so is to enable the establishment of socially responsible workplaces where individuals, regardless of their background, are given an equal opportunity to flourish in their assigned jobs.

Practical implications

The diversity justice management model introduced in this paper provides organizational justice (OJ)‐based guidelines for managers to ensure that OJ can be objectively benchmarked and discussed amongst diversity stakeholders to continuously improve actual and perceived OJ outcomes.

Social implications

The social implication of this conceptual paper is reduction of workforce marginalization and establishment of socially responsible organizations whereby those marginalized (e.g. people with disabilities) can effectively work in their organizations.

Originality/value

This is the first attempt to establish a diveristy justice management model, which incorporates normative principles of organizational justice into diversity management processes and outcomes.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Mehmet Haluk Koksal

The purpose of this paper is to identify the factors affecting male fashion leadership behaviour. The study examined the effect of fashion consciousness, fashion…

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2587

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the factors affecting male fashion leadership behaviour. The study examined the effect of fashion consciousness, fashion knowledge, mood enhancement, decision-making confidence and brand switching as the psychological factors. It also included the influence of behavioural factors such as the information sources, attributes of purchasing fashion clothing and type of retailers on male fashion leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected through a structured questionnaire distributed in the main shopping districts of Beirut, Lebanon, during March 2012.

Findings

The study uncovered that fashion consciousness, fashion knowledge, confidence in decision making and mood enhancement are to be the most important psychological factors influencing male fashion leadership behaviour. The study also found that frequency of reading fashion magazines is negatively and significantly affecting fashion leadership. Male fashion leaders use colleagues and friends as the main information sources for fashion. The effect of attractiveness, brand name, store image and quality of clothing is positive and significant whilst value for money negatively and significantly influences male fashion leadership. Male fashion leaders mainly shop from specialty shops, chain stores, department stores and the internet.

Originality/value

Although there are a handful of studies which examined female fashion leadership, the male fashion leadership concept has not been extensively addressed in the literature. In an attempt to at least partially address this, the study attempts to identify the factors affecting male fashion leadership behaviour in Lebanon.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 23 September 2019

Shahar Robinstain

State leaders’ decision-making calculus is often attributed to external factors. The political arena, international community pressure and a country’s military stance all…

Abstract

State leaders’ decision-making calculus is often attributed to external factors. The political arena, international community pressure and a country’s military stance all take centre stage in the analysis of national security decisions. Little weight is given to personal aspects of a leader’s psyche in explaining these decisions; this is true to the bulk of the research regarding this topic. This study theorizes and tests a positive link between Israeli leaders’ combat military experience and their propensity to enter into ‘peacemaking’ decisions namely, peace talks, cease fires and unilateral withdrawals. This research uses a new database comprising all peacemaking decision points in Israel’s history, looking at the pressure put on a leader from outside factors and his military experience to explain the decision taken. It finds a strong significant link between combat experience and the tendency to enter in a peacemaking decision with little regard to ideological affiliation, shedding a new light on Israeli politicians from both sides of the aisle.

Details

How Do Leaders Make Decisions?
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-394-6

Keywords

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