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1 – 10 of over 1000
Article
Publication date: 14 August 2007

Roberta Hill, Phillip Capper, Ken Wilson, Richard Whatman and Karen Wong

The purpose of this paper is to describe how, from 2004‐2006, a New Zealand research team experimented with the “change laboratory” learning process to create a new method…

1415

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe how, from 2004‐2006, a New Zealand research team experimented with the “change laboratory” learning process to create a new method of government policy development and implementation, referred to as “practice‐making”. The apple industry in Hawke's Bay was chosen because of the level of tension among government agencies and small/medium‐sized firms in the industry, particularly around the scarcity of seasonal labour, amid growing concerns about the possible collapse of the industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The team stimulated a cycle of expansive learning among the network of activity systems in the industry. Laboratory participants were growers, labour contractors, pack house operators, quality controllers, horticultural consultants and government officials. The expansive learning cycle is a core concept in developmental work research (DWR) and cultural‐historical activity theory (CHAT).

Findings

Participants created a shared “object” for apple production and its government policy and regulation built around quality, making a substantive shift from adaptive learning to transformational learning, and creating a major redesign of the industry. Many of the new practices are now being implemented in the industry and government.

Practical implications

The CHAT/DWR approach seems particularly well suited for complex problem solving in any network where there are intractable systems contradictions and a strong desire among participants to make real change.

Originality/value

It is understood that this is the first time a change laboratory process has been used for government “practice‐making” with industry, in contrast with traditional policy development and implementation that frequently does not address systemic problems.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Migration Practice as Creative Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-766-4

Article
Publication date: 28 June 2021

Shoufeng Cao, Kim Bryceson and Damian Hine

The aim of this paper is to explore the value of collaborative risk management in a decentralised multi-tier global fresh produce supply chain.

386

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to explore the value of collaborative risk management in a decentralised multi-tier global fresh produce supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilised a mixed methods approach. A qualitative field study was conducted to examine the need for collaborative risk management. The simulation experiments with industry datasets were conducted to assess whether risk-sharing contracts work in mitigating joint risks in parts of and across the supply chain.

Findings

The qualitative field study revealed risk propagation and the inefficiency of company-specific risk management strategies in value delivery. The simulation results indicated that risk-sharing contracts can incentivise various actors to absorb interrelated risks for value creation.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited to risks relevant to supply chain processes in the Australia–China table grrape supply chain and does not consider product-related risks and the risk-taking behaviours of supply chain actors.

Practical implications

Collaborative risk management can be deployed to mitigate systematic risks that disrupt global fresh produce supply chains. The results offer evidence-based knowledge to supply chain professionals in understanding the value of collaborative risk assessment and management and provide insights on how to conduct collaborative risk management for effective risk management.

Originality/value

The results contribute to the supply chain risk management literature by new collaborative forms for effective risk management and strategic competition of “supply chain to supply chain” in multi-tier food supply chains.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Albert P.C. Chan, Wen Yi and Francis K.W. Wong

Extreme hot environments are prevalent in many occupational settings, and facilities management workers are no exception. Wearing suitable cooling garment is a useful…

542

Abstract

Purpose

Extreme hot environments are prevalent in many occupational settings, and facilities management workers are no exception. Wearing suitable cooling garment is a useful means to alleviate heat strain and improving performance at heat exposure. This paper aims to evaluate the effectiveness and applicability of the cooling vest across four selected fields (i.e. construction, outdoor cleaning and horticulture, kitchen work and work involved manual handling at the airport) and identify the shortcomings of the cooling vest used by the participating workers.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a two-phase design: a quantitative questionnaire survey followed by qualitative in-depth interviews.

Findings

A remarkable physical strain alleviation (PSA) of 21.1 per cent (14.8 per cent in construction, 18.8 per cent in horticulture and cleaning, 27.4 per cent in kitchen and catering and 26.5 per cent in airport apron service) is achieved by the use of cooling vest in four industries. Despite the success of PSA, several shortcomings of the cooling vest were identified: easily stained color, heavy weight, short cooling time, inflexibility that presents a hazard around moving equipment, lack of industry-specific design, nondurable and thick fabric with poor permeability.

Originality/value

The findings of the current study do not only confirm the effectiveness of the cooling vest in alleviating heat strain and physical strain but also identify the major shortcomings upon which further improvements can be made.

Details

Facilities, vol. 34 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 February 2019

Oluseyi F. Olaitan, Nick J. Hubbard and Colin G. Bamford

The purpose of this paper is to explore the barriers inhibiting horticulture product export from Nigeria, particularly to the UK, and identify those requiring resolution…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the barriers inhibiting horticulture product export from Nigeria, particularly to the UK, and identify those requiring resolution if global horticulture value chains (GHVCs) are to contribute to economic growth in Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

A single-case (embedded) research design was adopted. In total, 26 participants from five stakeholder groups (namely, farmers, exporters, air freight forwarders, aviation operators and government institutions) were selected for investigation to examine the research problem.

Findings

The empirical investigation showed that: the existing institutional framework, infrastructure and logistics issues, market penetration issues, stakeholders’ incompetence, food safety and quality issues, high transaction costs, operational challenges of exporting, neglect of agriculture and the existing airline market structure are prominent barriers that require resolution if horticultural product exports are to increase.

Research limitations/implications

The study focuses on the analysis of five key stakeholder groups upstream in the supply chain. Further investigation should include stakeholders downstream (importers, wholesalers and retailers).

Originality/value

The specific case study of horticultural product export from Nigeria offers empirically rich insights into the barriers hindering the participation of Nigeria in GHVCs.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

C.H.A. Verhaar and H.R.M. Smulders

In this paper data referring to the salience of life long learning policies for employees are presented. These data are gathered from people working in Dutch horticulture

3937

Abstract

In this paper data referring to the salience of life long learning policies for employees are presented. These data are gathered from people working in Dutch horticulture and Dutch dairy industry. The study focuses on the points of view these employees have regarding the need to invest in their employability through training. The results emphasise the importance of training on the job for these employees, which according to many of them actually is sufficient to grow into a good worker. This is not in line with the emphasis laid on training and investing in human capital in general in the growing employability literature. Thus much needs to be done to communicate this need (assuming that it is real indeed) to the workforce. Therefore, the conclusion is drawn that employability policies do not relate to economic theory, such as the human capital approach, but rather to social theory

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 11 April 2012

Reidar Almås and Hugh Campbell

At the outset of this book, we argued that it was important that we study agricultural “policy regimes” rather than agricultural policy itself. Our reasoning was that our…

Abstract

At the outset of this book, we argued that it was important that we study agricultural “policy regimes” rather than agricultural policy itself. Our reasoning was that our interest lies in the actual outcomes in terms of farming practice, industry arrangements, global trade linkages, technology assemblages, and agroecological relationships in particular countries and regions. It is a convenient fiction that these practices and arrangements are the direct result of the formal agricultural policy arrangements in each specific country. In reality, the formal policy process in each country (including not only agriculture, but also, in some cases, rural, environmental, trade, and social development policy) can be argued to be in constant interaction with wider global politics, geographically specific environmental and cultural dynamics, prevailing farm practices, and new technologies. To recognize this full assembly of dynamics that coordinate to determine actual farm practice, we use the term “policy regimes.” In neoliberalized economies such as New Zealand, there is even a strong sense in which devolved governance at the industry and sector level now operates within these regimes in the same way that formal agricultural policy does in European countries.

Details

Rethinking Agricultural Policy Regimes: Food Security, Climate Change and the Future Resilience of Global Agriculture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-349-1

Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Albert P.C Chan, Francis K.W. Wong and Yang Yang

The Hong Kong government agencies launched a “Cooling Vest Promotion Pilot Scheme” across four industries, namely, construction, horticulture and cleaning, airport apron…

Abstract

Purpose

The Hong Kong government agencies launched a “Cooling Vest Promotion Pilot Scheme” across four industries, namely, construction, horticulture and cleaning, airport apron services, and kitchen and catering industries in 2013. A follow-up questionnaire survey regarding this innovative heat stress controlling measure was administered to evaluate its applicability to these industries. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The questionnaire surveys were separately administered to frontline workers and management staff. A total of 232 workers from the four industries participated in the full-scale questionnaire survey (A), which aimed to evaluate the perceived effectiveness of cooling vests, worker satisfaction, and willingness to wear cooling vests. The survey was also geared toward eliciting the comments of the workers regarding logistics-related issues. A total of 100 members of the management staff across the four industries participated in the questionnaire survey (B), which aimed to solicit their feedback about the Pilot Scheme and the logistic arrangements for using cooling vests.

Findings

On the basis of the survey results, a systems model was established. The model revealed that the applicability of cooling vests mainly depends on the perceived benefits (i.e. worker satisfaction) and logistic costs. The results implied that the existing personal cooling vest failed to satisfy the workers’ needs and incurred potential logistic costs, which likely limited the broad application of cooling vests.

Originality/value

The current study employed a systematics thinking approach and provided practical recommendations that could benefit industrial practitioners in the extensive application of an innovative heat stress precautionary measure.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

Paul N. Finlay

The strategic moves made by Fisons from the start of the company through to the present are charted. The significant events and strategic moves for the period up to 1980…

Abstract

The strategic moves made by Fisons from the start of the company through to the present are charted. The significant events and strategic moves for the period up to 1980 are chronicled first, followed by events during the two subsequent periods, the crisis years 1980–1983 and the years post‐1983. The strategic planning tools and methodologies used by Fisons during these periods are discussed.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1997

Mike Wilson

Reports on a study organized by leading robotics organizations and sponsored by the DTI to review various sectors where the UK can develop a world‐class industry, namely…

273

Abstract

Reports on a study organized by leading robotics organizations and sponsored by the DTI to review various sectors where the UK can develop a world‐class industry, namely: hazardous environments; transportation and services; construction; medical and pharmaceutical; food industry; agriculture and horticulture; and advanced robotics technology. Reviews the recommendations and proposes further action which should be taken for further development of a strong robotics industry.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

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