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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2020

Roberta Guglielmetti Mugion and Elisa Menicucci

The aim of this study is to undertake a systemic literature review (SLR) of horticultural therapy and to explore whether its inclusion in a healthcare programme can…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to undertake a systemic literature review (SLR) of horticultural therapy and to explore whether its inclusion in a healthcare programme can enhance hospitalised children's well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study was developed using a mixed methods approach to monitor stakeholders' perceptions of horticultural therapy. Specifically, hospitalised children (N = 31) and their families (N = 21), as well as medical and nursing staff (N = 3), were engaged in the empirical study. Qualitative and quantitative surveys were developed, involving two paediatric units in an Italian hospital.

Findings

The authors’ findings show a significant improvement of children's mood and psycho-physical well-being following horticultural therapy. The authors found positive effects of interactive horticultural therapy on hospitalised paediatric patients and their parents. Parents perceived a positive influence on their mood and found the therapy very beneficial for their children. Qualitative analyses of children's and parents' comments (and related rankings) revealed the helpful support role of horticultural therapy in dealing with the hospitalisation period. There is a very limited number of studies that have inspected co-therapy implementation in paediatric hospitals, and to the best of the authors' knowledge, no study has yet examined the effect of horticultural therapy in such a context. The practice of horticultural therapy with children in health settings has been documented in some Italian hospitals, but its effectiveness has not yet been well established in the literature.

Originality/value

The authors’ findings could provide useful insights to clinicians, health managers and directors in creating and sustaining a successful group co-therapy programme under the managed healthcare system.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2013

Jane Clatworthy, Joe Hinds and Paul M. Camic

The number of gardening-based mental health interventions is increasing, yet when the literature was last reviewed in 2003, limited evidence of their effectiveness was…

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Abstract

Purpose

The number of gardening-based mental health interventions is increasing, yet when the literature was last reviewed in 2003, limited evidence of their effectiveness was identified. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the current evidence-base for gardening-based mental health interventions and projects through examining their reported benefits and the quality of research in this field.

Design/methodology/approach

Studies evaluating the benefits of gardening-based interventions for adults experiencing mental health difficulties were identified through an electronic database search. Information on the content and theoretical foundations of the interventions, the identified benefits of the interventions and the study methodology was extracted and synthesised.

Findings

Ten papers published since 2003 met the inclusion criteria. All reported positive effects of gardening as a mental health intervention for service users, including reduced symptoms of depression and anxiety. Participants described a range of benefits across emotional, social, vocational, physical and spiritual domains. Overall the research was of a considerably higher quality than that reviewed in 2003, providing more convincing evidence in support of gardening-based interventions. However, none of the studies employed a randomised-controlled trial design.

Research limitations/implications

There is a need for further high-quality research in this field. It is important that adequate outcome measures are in place to evaluate existing gardening-based mental health interventions/projects effectively.

Originality/value

This paper provides an up-to-date critique of the evidence for gardening-based mental health interventions, highlighting their potential clinical value.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 18 August 2010

Joe Sempik

This article discusses the role that gardening, horticulture and farming can play in promoting mental well‐being and in supporting the recovery of individuals with mental…

Abstract

This article discusses the role that gardening, horticulture and farming can play in promoting mental well‐being and in supporting the recovery of individuals with mental health problems.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Dorthe Varning Poulsen

The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive argument for nature-based therapy (NBT) for veterans with post-traumatic stress syndrome. It is the aim to generate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive argument for nature-based therapy (NBT) for veterans with post-traumatic stress syndrome. It is the aim to generate an overview of the evidence for NBT to the target group. A review of available scientific literature within the field, has been comprehensively conducted. This work is the foundation for the recommendations to decision makers and politicians.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides a conceptual analyses and a general review of the literature. Following steps have been conducted. Based on the research question, relevant work (scientific papers) have been identified using search terms in English within the three areas the target group (veterans), the diagnosis (post-traumatic stress disorder, PTSD) and treatment (NBT). Study-quality and evidence level have been assessed and discussed.

Findings

The findings show a wide variation according to the interventions the nature setting, the length and frequency of the NBT session as well as the health outcome measures. The studies demonstrated a positive impact on the PTSD symptoms, quality of life and hope. None of the studies found negative impact of the interventions. Being in a group of other veterans facing the same problems was highlighted as well. Some studies measured the ability to return to workforce for the veterans and found NBT beneficial in that process.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation of the research due to the methods of identifying studies. The purpose of this was to give an overview of existing literature, and there can be studies, that are not found in this process. Including qualitative and quantitative methods are useful in a process of understanding the impact of NBT for veterans with PTSD. The quantitative studies, which unfortunately are few, can give information of the extent to which the treatment affects the symptoms of PTSD. Seen in the perspective of the burden for the veterans suffering from PTSD and the economic burden for society, the process of synthesizing the research in the field in order to generate a fundament seems necessary.

Practical implications

This policy papers are useful in order to make recommendations for politicians and decision makers as well as practitioners.

Social implications

The burden of suffering from PTSD is heavy for the veterans and their family. The society must drive forward the development of new and better evidence-based treatment programs for veterans with PTSD. NBT might be a step in the right direction of this.

Originality/value

It is well-known that there are an increase in the number of veterans diagnosed with PTSD. Generally the drop-out rate of the veterans is high in conventional treatment and it is found that veterans experience some side effects from medical treatment. NBT is, in existing research, found to have a positive impact on the veterans, and therefore, it should be part of future treatment programs for veterans with PTSD.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Ambra Burls

Abstract

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Abstract

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Sue Twigg

Thrive has achieved recognition in the UK, and beyond, as the authoritative organisation in all areas of social and therapeutic horticulture. The charity was formed in…

Abstract

Thrive has achieved recognition in the UK, and beyond, as the authoritative organisation in all areas of social and therapeutic horticulture. The charity was formed in 1978 to promote and support the use of social and therapeutic horticulture. Its mission is to enrich people's lives by enabling disadvantaged, disabled and older people through gardening to participate fully in the social and economic life of the community. This descriptive article looks at the work of the organisation and provides information about the training it has to offer. In short, Thrive uses gardening and horticulture to enrich people's lives.

Details

A Life in the Day, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

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Article
Publication date: 15 October 2019

Julie Barrett, Simon Evans and Neil Mapes

The purpose of this paper is to examine the recent evidence relating to green (nature-based) dementia care for people living with dementia in long-term accommodation and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the recent evidence relating to green (nature-based) dementia care for people living with dementia in long-term accommodation and care settings (housing for older people that provides both accommodation and care, such as residential care homes, nursing homes and extra care housing schemes). The review formed part of a pilot study exploring interaction with nature for people living with dementia in care homes and extra care housing schemes in the UK. Rather than a comprehensive systematic or critical literature review, the intention was to increase understanding of green dementia care to support the pilot study.

Design/methodology/approach

The review draws together the published and grey literature on the impacts of green (nature-based) dementia care, the barriers and enablers and good practice in provision. People living with dementia in accommodation and care settings are the focus of this review, due to the research study of which the review is part. Evidence relating to the impacts of engaging with nature on people in general, older people and residents in accommodation and care is also briefly examined as it has a bearing on people living with dementia.

Findings

Although interaction with the natural environment may not guarantee sustained wellbeing for all people living with dementia, there is some compelling evidence for a number of health and wellbeing benefits for many. However, there is a clear need for more large-scale rigorous research in this area, particularly with reference to health and wellbeing outcomes for people living with dementia in accommodation and care settings for which the evidence is limited. There is a stronger evidence base on barriers and enablers to accessing nature for people living with dementia in such settings.

Research limitations/implications

The literature review was conducted to support a pilot study exploring green (nature-based) dementia care in care homes and extra care housing schemes in the UK. Consequently, the focus of the review was on green dementia care in accommodation and care settings. The study, and thus the review, also focussed on direct contact with nature (whether that occurs outdoors or indoors) rather than indirect contact (e.g. viewing nature in a photograph, on a TV screen or through a window) or simulated nature (e.g. robot pets). Therefore, this paper is not a full review of all aspects of green dementia care.

Originality/value

This paper presents an up-to-date review of literature relating to green dementia care in accommodation and care settings. It was successful in increasing understanding to support a pilot study exploring opportunities, benefits, barriers and enablers to interaction with nature for people living with dementia in care homes and extra care housing schemes in the UK. It demonstrated the impacts, value and accessibility of nature engagement in these settings and identified gaps in the evidence base. This review and subsequent pilot study provide a strong platform from which to conduct future research exploring green dementia care in accommodation and care settings.

Details

Housing, Care and Support, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 17 December 2018

Barb Toews, Amy Wagenfeld and Julie Stevens

The purpose of this paper is to understand the impact of a short-term nature-based intervention on the social-emotional well-being of women incarcerated on a mental health…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the impact of a short-term nature-based intervention on the social-emotional well-being of women incarcerated on a mental health unit in a state prison.

Design/methodology/approach

This research used a mixed method approach with individual interviews, a focus group and a visual analog scale (VAS).

Findings

Qualitative results found that women appreciated the planting party and the way the plants improved the physical environment. Women were also emotionally and relationally impacted by their participation and practiced skills related to planting and working with people. Quantitative results indicate that women were happier, calmer, and more peaceful after the intervention than before.

Research limitations/implications

Study limitations include sample size, self-report data and use of a scale not yet tested for reliability and validity.

Practical implications

Findings suggest that nature-based interventions can serve as an adjunct to traditional mental health therapies in correctional settings. Nature-based interventions can support women’s goals to improve their mental health.

Social implications

Findings suggest that nature-based interventions can serve to improve relationships among incarcerated women, which may make a positive impact on the prison community. Such interventions may also assist them in developing relational and technical skills that are useful upon release.

Originality/value

To date, there is limited knowledge about the impact of nature-based interventions on incarcerated individuals coping with mental health concerns.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2009

Jostein Vik and Maja Farstad

Green care – the utilisation of farms as the basis for health services – is seen as a promising addition to other health services, and it is seen as a viable…

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1109

Abstract

Purpose

Green care – the utilisation of farms as the basis for health services – is seen as a promising addition to other health services, and it is seen as a viable diversification strategy for many farm families. However, the number of such services is low both in Norway and in Europe in general. The development of green care seems to have stagnated. This paper seeks to analyze and discuss the case of Norwegian green care in order to reflect on the hindrances to the further development of a viable green care sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyzes the green care market, green care policies and the interaction of social worlds that are necessary to make the green care sector function smoothly.

Findings

The conclusion is that there is a sound basis for a green care market and that there are sufficient political support and political engagement for the development of green care in Norway. The problem with the green care sector is the interaction between the “social worlds” involved in the sector – the suppliers/farmers, the users, and the (public sector) buyers. It is argued that the development of a green care market is hampered by the lack of an institutional framework and a set of market devices capable of bringing key actors together.

Research limitations/implications

The paper presents an analysis of the Norwegian green care sector. It shows that there are substantial cross‐national differences between health service systems, and therefore comparisons between nations are difficult. However, the principal challenges – diverse social groups, the lack of institutional frames, and immature markets – are shared. Therefore, the need for further research is evident and there are lessons to be learned from cross‐national comparison and case studies.

Originality/value

Within the green care research field, there have been few social science studies that address organisational issues and the governance of this new and emerging business. Theoretically oriented and analytical contributions on organisational aspects of green care services are therefore timely. This paper is such a contribution.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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