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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2019

Andres Barrios, Ezequiel Reficco and Rodrigo Taborda

The purpose of this paper is to explore the extent to which hope and perceived goal attainment can be developed in subsistence entrepreneurs through the right training tools.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the extent to which hope and perceived goal attainment can be developed in subsistence entrepreneurs through the right training tools.

Design/methodology/approach

A longitudinal study of a subsistence entrepreneurship training program in three Central American countries was carried out. Participants were divided on the basis of their exposure to training (yes, no), and of the type of training received (none, business plan, business model). The authors carried out three assessments (just before the program, six months and one year after the program) of participants’ business goals and their hope of attaining them. Information was analyzed using linear regression.

Findings

Participants exposed to training reported significant increases in perceived goal attainment and in their hope levels. Training based on the business plan affected hope agency in the short term, as predicted by the logic of causation theory. Training based on the business canvas affected hope pathways, as predicted by the logic of effectuation theory.

Research limitations/implications

Given the data collection process (a non-random sample and selection of participants), the findings are not generalizable without stringent procedures and further replication.

Practical implications

If hope is a reliable predictor of goal attainment, it should be promoted and measured. Given the limited means of gathering data and making reliable projections that most entrepreneurs endure, the business canvas’ contribution to entrepreneurs’ “emotional equipment” ceteris paribus should be more valuable for subsistence entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

This is the first study comparing the short- and long-term effects of two entrepreneurial learning devices on entrepreneurs’ hope and business goal attainment.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 61 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2013

Ugur Yavas, Emin Babakus and Osman M. Karatepe

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether hope as a personal resource moderates the relationships between job burnout and frontline bank employees’ in‐role and

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine whether hope as a personal resource moderates the relationships between job burnout and frontline bank employees’ in‐role and extra‐role performances.

Design/methodology/approach

Frontline employees of several banks throughout the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus serve as the study setting.

Findings

Results of the study reveal that burnout is significantly related to frontline employees’ in‐role and extra‐role performances and that hope moderates these relationships.

Research limitations/implications

Though common method bias does not appear to be a potential threat to the magnitude of relationships, in future studies using multiple‐informants (e.g. performance data from supervisors or customers) would be useful. In addition, replication studies among front employees in other countries would be beneficial for further generalizations.

Practical implications

Management of the banks should consider the personality traits of the individuals during the selection process. This is important, since hope reduces the detrimental impact of burnout on performance outcomes. Management should also retain employees high in hope, because such employees can create a positive work environment and serve as role models to their colleagues with low hope.

Originality/value

Empirical research in the banks services literature pertaining to the effect of hope on extra‐role performance and hope as a moderator of the impact of burnout on in‐role and extra‐role performances is scarce. Therefore, this study adds to the literature in this research stream by investigating the aforementioned relationships.

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Maureen T B Drysdale, Margaret L McBeath, Kristina Johansson, Sheri Dressler and Elena Zaitseva

The purpose of this paper is to explore – on an international level – the relationship between work-integrated learning (WIL) and several psychological attributes (i.e…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore – on an international level – the relationship between work-integrated learning (WIL) and several psychological attributes (i.e. hope, procrastination, self-concept, self-efficacy, motivation, and study skills) believed to be important for a successful transition to the labor market.

Design/methodology/approach

A between-subjects design was used with participants in one of two groups: WIL and non-WIL. The design provided data on the effects of the independent variable (WIL) on a number of dependent variables (attributes) across four countries. Data were collected via an online survey and analyzed using a series of ANOVAs and MANOVAs.

Findings

WIL and non-WIL students in the four countries shared several attributes – however – significant differences also emerged. WIL compared to non-WIL students compared reported stronger math and problem solving self-concepts, yet weaker effort regulation and perceived critical thinking skills. WIL students were more extrinsically motivated than their non-WIL peers in three of the four countries. Female students in WIL reported being the most anxious compared to other students.

Research limitations/implications

Self-reports to measure psychological attributes and the small sample sizes at some of the institutions are limitations.

Originality/value

The positive relationship between participation in WIL and several aspects of positive self-concept are provided. In addition, data are provided indicating that overall there are more similarities than differences between WIL and non-WIL students on a number of psychological outcomes. Data also suggests that females who participate in WIL may be at risk for anxiety problems.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Mohga A Badran and Carolyn M. Youssef-Morgan

The purpose of this paper is to extend the boundaries of positive organizational behavior (Luthans, 2002a, b) to North Africa and the Middle East. Specifically, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend the boundaries of positive organizational behavior (Luthans, 2002a, b) to North Africa and the Middle East. Specifically, the relevance of Psychological Capital (PsyCap et al., 2007), composed of the positive psychological resources of hope, efficacy, resilience and optimism, is conceptualized and tested in Egypt in relation to job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

A contextualized theoretical model is derived, in which PsyCap can lead to job satisfaction through a set of positive mechanisms. Structural equation modeling is used to test the hypothesized relationships on a sample of 451 Egyptian employees in 11 organizations representing some of Egypt’s most important industries in terms of GDP, employment and world economy integration.

Findings

Hope, efficacy, resilience and optimism, individually and when integrated into the higher-order multidimensional construct, PsyCap, are positively related to the job satisfaction of Egyptian employees.

Research limitations/implications

This paper supports the external validity of hope, efficacy, resilience and optimism, individually and when integrated into the higher-order multidimensional construct, PsyCap, in the African and Egyptian context.

Practical implications

Egyptian organizations, as well as global companies that conduct business operations in Africa, may find PsyCap to be a new potential source of human-based competitive advantage. PsyCap is state-like and thus open to development through workplace interventions.

Originality/value

This study provides evidence for the first time for the external and construct validity of PsyCap in North Africa. Zoogah (2008) found a dearth of articles that focus on North Africa, specifically the Arabian heritage. This paper begins to fill this gap. A context-bound approach is used to refine and integrate PsyCap theory with the cognitive, affective and behavioral processes of the African and Egyptian context.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 May 2011

Jay R. Tombaugh, Clifton Mayfield and Roger Durand

This study aims to provide preliminary evidence for a new conceptualization and measure of workplace spirituality labeled spiritual expression at work (SEW). While the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide preliminary evidence for a new conceptualization and measure of workplace spirituality labeled spiritual expression at work (SEW). While the extant literature focuses on the fulfillment of workers' spiritual needs, spiritual expression refers to the impact of personal spirituality on the everyday thoughts, behaviors and interactions of employees.

Design/methodology/approach

A pilot study (n=92) included item generation and an exploratory factor analysis of the five‐item SEW scale (SEWS). The primary validation study (n=348) consisted of: performing a confirmatory factor analysis of the SEWS; comparing the SEWS with other spirituality measures, including two measures of personal spirituality and two measures of values‐based workplace spirituality; psychometrically assessing the convergent, discriminant and predictive validity of the SEWS; and examining the correlations and regression results between the SEWS and the comparison measures.

Findings

The SEWS showed acceptable psychometric properties across both samples, and the results support the convergent, discriminate and predictive validities of the SEW construct.

Research limitations/implications

This study is subject to the typical limitations of cross‐sectional research. However, meaningful results were obtained across two samples.

Practical implications

These results suggest workers may express their spirituality regardless of their perceptions of the spiritual nature of the organization. In doing so, personal spirituality may impact important personal and organizational outcomes.

Originality/value

This study moves beyond existing research by showing a new way to assess workplace spirituality.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Suzanne J. Peterson and Fred Luthans

Although hope is commonly used in terms of wishful thinking, as a positive psychological concept consisting of the dimensions of both willpower (agency) and waypower …

Abstract

Although hope is commonly used in terms of wishful thinking, as a positive psychological concept consisting of the dimensions of both willpower (agency) and waypower (pathways), it has been found to be positively related to academic, athletic and health outcomes. The impact of hopeful leaders, however, has not been empirically analyzed. This exploratory study (N = 59) found that high‐ as compared to low‐hope leaders had more profitable work units and had better satisfaction and retention rates among their subordinates. The implications of these preliminary findings of the positive impact that hopeful leaders may have in the workplace are discussed.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2018

Agnieszka Kierner

The purpose of this paper is to employ hope theory to explain the psychological process underlying the dual-career couple (DCC) family unit, during the full cycle of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to employ hope theory to explain the psychological process underlying the dual-career couple (DCC) family unit, during the full cycle of international relocation.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study is based on in-depth interviews with 28 international dual-careerists. Hope theory is used to describe the evolution of their goals, pathways and agency thinking before, during, and after expatriation.

Findings

The study reveals that dual-career partners initially build goals, pathways, and agency to support family relocation to facilitate the expatriate’s career goals, but later the absence of self-career realization means hope can diminish and the partner’s career comes to drive the goals set for repatriation. Future assignments would be considered only if both partners can arrange relevant employment for themselves.

Practical implications

Companies should develop DCC support practices such as designing shorter assignments, ensuring that partners have work visas and support job seeking. Ideally, multinational corporations would employ the spouse in the DCC.

Originality/value

The study is one of the first to explore the evolution of the goals of DCCs during the entire expatriation process.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 6 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2019

Syed Muhammad Fazel-e-Hasan, Gary Mortimer, Ian Lings and Judy Drennan

Occasionally, retail employees “break the rules” in order to help customers. Currently, there is little research on the mechanisms by which a sales assistants’ positive…

Abstract

Purpose

Occasionally, retail employees “break the rules” in order to help customers. Currently, there is little research on the mechanisms by which a sales assistants’ positive deviance intentions help them attain specific personal and organisational goals. The purpose of this paper is to examine one mechanism, hope, which develops employees’ deviance intentions to provide benefits to the customer, themselves and the organisation.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey captured responses from 270 frontline employees from the retail and services sector. AMOS 23 was used to conduct measurement, path and mediation analyses.

Findings

This study highlights the role of employee hope in developing employees’ positive deviance intentions, and improving perceptions of organisational performance. Results demonstrate that the direct positive impact of hope on positive deviance intention was significant. Furthermore, positive deviance intention was found to positively impact employee goal attainment and perceived organisational performance. The authors’ employee hope model offers a better understanding of positive outcomes of employee deviance, suggesting that retail managers should invest resources to build strong employee–organisation relationships.

Originality/value

This is the first study to empirically demonstrate that employee hope can explain how customer-oriented positive deviance intentions help employee goal attainment and improve their perceptions of organisational performance.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 47 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Book part
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Carolyn M. Youssef and Fred Luthans

In this chapter, we draw from the emerging positive organizational behavior movement to describe the role that hope can play in the effectiveness of Egyptian…

Abstract

In this chapter, we draw from the emerging positive organizational behavior movement to describe the role that hope can play in the effectiveness of Egyptian organizational leaders. After providing a brief review of the theory and research on hope, we suggest ways that hopeful Egyptian organizational leaders can be developed and “hopefully” thrive in these times.

Details

Advances in Global Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-160-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2004

Fred Luthans, René Van Wyk and Fred O. Walumbwa

The significant challenges faced by South Africa at present are well known. How to deal with the problems from a political and economic perspective abound, but taking a…

Abstract

The significant challenges faced by South Africa at present are well known. How to deal with the problems from a political and economic perspective abound, but taking a psychological approach has been neglected. This paper proposes a positive approach to South African organizational leadership based on the psychological capacity of hope. After giving a brief background on the context surrounding South African organizations, the theory, research, and application of hope relevant to organizational leadership in the “Rainbow Nation” are presented and analyzed. Such an overlooked positive approach represented by hopeful organizational leaders seems needed at this juncture of South Africa's present and future.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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