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1 – 10 of 713
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Ya‐Fang Wang, Picheng Lee, Chen‐Lung Chin and Gary Kleinman

This study examines whether a regulation on mandatory disclosure of financial forecasts since June 1991 and further sanction imposition since March 1998 contribute to…

1353

Abstract

This study examines whether a regulation on mandatory disclosure of financial forecasts since June 1991 and further sanction imposition since March 1998 contribute to lower IPO firms’ initial and aftermarket returns, and shorten honeymoon periods. The study is based on 423 IPO firms after the regulation required them to disclose their forecasts and 53 IPO firms prior to the regulation. The findings report that initial and aftermarket returns are lower, and honeymoon periods are shorter in the post‐regulation period than those in the pre‐regulation. The findings also report that initial and aftermarket returns are relatively smaller, and the honeymoon periods are shorter after the March 1998 regulatory sanction was imposed after controlling other variables. These results document that the financial forecasts disclosure regulation evidently contributes to mitigating information asymmetry.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 November 2017

Bhuminan Piyathasanan, Christine Mathies, Paul G. Patterson and Ko de Ruyter

Crowdsourcing delivers creative ideas for the issuing firm, but participants’ engagement in the creative process also creates additional benefits to firms and…

1692

Abstract

Purpose

Crowdsourcing delivers creative ideas for the issuing firm, but participants’ engagement in the creative process also creates additional benefits to firms and participating customers. The purpose of this study is to investigate if these spill-over values endure over time. With data from two time point, i.e. at submission and after announcement of the contest winners, we examine the relationship between the degree of a participant’s creative process engagement (CPE) and value creation from a crowdsourcing contest, and how these perceptions of value change over time.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 154 participants in a crowdsourcing contest at two time points with an online survey: at submission, and after receiving feedback (in term of rankings, rewards, and comments) from the community. Partial Least Square path modelling was used to estimate both main and moderating effects.

Findings

CPE increases the perceived value of customers (social and epistemic value) and firms alike (knowledge-sharing intention and customer loyalty), though all but epistemic values decrease over time. Disconfirmation of expectations and need for recognition moderate these effects.

Originality/value

This paper is the first longitudinal study that helps understanding the effect of CPE on value creation from crowdsourcing across time. It also uses the theoretical lens of the honeymoon hangover effect to explain how perceived value changes. The resulting insights into the role of customer engagement in crowdsourcing contests and subsequent value creation will be beneficial to the growing research stream on consumer value co-creation and user innovation.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2021

Frank Lattuch and Enno Ruppert

Mergers & acquisitions (M&As) can be an effective way to expand into new markets or business opportunities. Yet, a considerable number of failed M&As can be attributed to…

266

Abstract

Purpose

Mergers & acquisitions (M&As) can be an effective way to expand into new markets or business opportunities. Yet, a considerable number of failed M&As can be attributed to disregarded human resource (HR) concerns. In particular, an organization’s leadership tends to hail the advantages of a merger or acquisition during the early stages, raising employees’ expectations (honeymoon effect). Many documented failures in such corporate transactions indicate organizational members’ declining satisfaction following a deal (hangover effect).

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on in-depth interviews with senior M&A experts (n = 12) at a global big-four accountancy firm and focus group sessions with their respective clients, this study investigates in two cases the interplay between HR issues and M&A transactions and infers effective risk management actions.

Findings

A honeymoon hangover after a transaction may appear in organizations if HR issues are neglected. Study results provide notable implications for HR departments and HR professionals facing a merger or acquisition. These implications include (1) focusing on HR risks, (2) involving HR executives to manage the HR due diligence efforts, (3) setting up transition teams that communicate well, (4) creating policies for learning and knowledge sharing, (5) developing new competencies for the NewCo, (6) being sensitive to cultural differences and (7) considering legal aspects.

Research limitations/implications

The two transactions studied revealed patterns that are important for successful change. However, we should not underestimate the individual perspective in M&As. Further studies with interview data directly from stakeholders are important to analyze further the relationships between HR due diligence, organizational learning, effective knowledge transfer, and culture. Due to our research approach, we cannot claim that the results can be generalizable to all major M&As. Further research is needed to measure the impact of the HR Due Diligence aspects outlined on M&A success.

Originality/value

Although M&As have been much researched, relatively little has been written on practical managerial adaptation from a human resource perspective and its implications for organizational learning. This article helps address this imbalance by providing a people-oriented approach for effectively managing M&As from beginning to integration.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2011

Trond Hammervoll

Cooperation in logistics and supply chain management has most often been studied as a characteristic of a focal firm, rather than as a relationship property, and…

1668

Abstract

Purpose

Cooperation in logistics and supply chain management has most often been studied as a characteristic of a focal firm, rather than as a relationship property, and inter‐organisational aspects need to be better understood. The purpose of this paper is to draw on insights from theories on individuals and organisations to study recently formed supply chain relationships (SCRs).

Design/methodology/approach

Following a literature review, the study develops an alternative view to the dominant strand of research on relational capital in SCRs. Drawing on insights from other disciplines, not usually associated with supply chain management, refutable propositions are suggested. Appropriate measurement scales for the new variables are suggested.

Findings

The notion of relational capital in SCRs is extended to include financial capital and psychological commitment. New propositions that relate relational capital and length of the honeymoon period (the time period immediately after SCR formation, during which the threat of dissolution is non‐existent) are suggested.

Research limitations/implications

The ideas presented in this paper have the potential to enrich further study on behavioural phenomena in SCRs as the analysis makes explicit the financial, social, and psychological dimensions of relational capital.

Practical implications

This paper presents managers with a richer framework than previously existed to guide their formation and maintenance efforts in building SCRs.

Originality/value

The paper fulfils an identified need for more and better inter‐organisational theory in supply chain management research.

Article
Publication date: 20 September 2013

Chatura Ranaweera and Kalyani Menon

The authors aim to study the direct and moderating effects of relationship age, continuance commitment and satisfaction on the generation of positive and negative word of…

3001

Abstract

Purpose

The authors aim to study the direct and moderating effects of relationship age, continuance commitment and satisfaction on the generation of positive and negative word of mouth (P/NWOM).

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses based on the notion of liability of adolescence and the motivation to generate P/NWOM were tested with data collected through a survey of a random sample of customers of fixed-line telephone users.

Findings

Relationship age adversely impacts PWOM and the effect of satisfaction on both P/NWOM. Continuance commitment increases NWOM and causes dissatisfied customers to generate greater NWOM while not affecting the PWOM of satisfied customers. Satisfaction shows a significant non-linear effect on WOM.

Research limitations/implications

Future research could conduct longitudinal or experimental work to explicate the causal mechanisms underlying these cross-sectional survey results. Research could also extend these results to a B-B context.

Practical implications

Results offer strong evidence of a dark side to long-term customer relationships. Recommendations focus on managing long-term relationships and perceptions of continuance commitment to minimise adverse effects.

Originality/value

As far as the authors know, this research is the first to offer a theoretically grounded explanation of the direct and moderating effects of relationship age on P/NWOM behaviour. Results challenge the premise of long-term customers being a panacea for numerous problems faced by firms. Findings also help explain the contradictory results in prior research on the effects of continuous commitment on WOM.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 47 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

J.A.A. Sillince, G.M.H. Sykes and Deol P. Singh

One problem in studying quality circles (QCs) is the shortage of objective measures of success. Another is the fact that many previous studies have been longitudinal but…

1413

Abstract

One problem in studying quality circles (QCs) is the shortage of objective measures of success. Another is the fact that many previous studies have been longitudinal but based on only one site. Presents results of a large sample of over 5,000 QCs which capture some longitudinal aspects of quality circle development and relate them to several objective and subjective measures of success. Contrary to previous small, longitudinal studies which have been reported in the literature, this study found no evidence at the level of organizational QC programmes to support the role of top and middle management in QC success, except for the need for management representation on steering committees. Data suggest that organizations with TQM have more successful QC programmes and (weakly) that older QC programmes are more successful.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Nola Agha and Daniel A. Rascher

The purpose of this paper is to understand why some sports show a positive economic impact and other sports do not, and to identify a common set of explanatory factors…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand why some sports show a positive economic impact and other sports do not, and to identify a common set of explanatory factors explaining the differences.

Design/methodology/approach

This explanatory research reviews the economic impact literature to identify the underlying conditions that would theoretically allow any sport, large or small, to generate positive economic effects.

Findings

Nine conditions are identified that, when present, could allow a community to experience a positive economic impact from a team or stadium. These are then used to explain the discrepancy in known empirical outcomes in major and minor league baseball (MiLB). It appears as if major league teams are more likely to violate the conditions than minor league teams. This research finds theoretical support for previous suggestions that smaller teams and events may be beneficial to local economies. In doing so, it also explains previous empirical results that found some MiLB classifications are associated with positive gains in per capita income.

Practical implications

Stakeholders can use the nine conditions to understand expected economic impact of their relevant sports. This research provides a comprehensive guide to understanding when economic impact can be positive.

Social implications

This research helps explain some of the existing controversy regarding economic impact analysis.

Originality/value

It is the first research to help provide a pre-set of conditions that can help predict whether positive economic impact will occur for specific sports teams or stadium projects.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

Abstract

Details

Onboarding: Getting New Hires off to a Flying Start
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-582-5

Article
Publication date: 12 September 2020

Safiya Mukhtar Alshibani and Thierry Volery

Social support has been identified as a valuable resource that could help entrepreneurs maintain goal directness in their endeavours and increase their life satisfaction…

Abstract

Purpose

Social support has been identified as a valuable resource that could help entrepreneurs maintain goal directness in their endeavours and increase their life satisfaction. However, to date, scant research has examined the effect of perceived social support on life satisfaction during the transition from paid employment to self-employment. This paper uses the job demand resource model (JD–R) as a theoretical lens to investigate this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the household income and labour dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey, we use latent growth curve modelling (LGCM) to investigate the trajectories of entrepreneurs' perceived social support and life satisfaction (n = 1,303) up to five years after their transition into self-employment.

Findings

Results suggest that entrepreneurs experience a boost in life satisfaction in the transition phase, followed by a declining trend in the years that follow. We find that both the initial perception and the evolution of perceived social support are positively related to life satisfaction over time across gender groups. However, we find that females may benefit more from early social support soon after the transition into self-employment to forestall declines in life satisfaction over the long-term.

Research limitations/implications

The generalisability of the research findings beyond the Australian context is undefined. Future research needs to examine to what extent these results can generalize to other samples within different cultural and institutional frameworks.

Practical implications

Since perceived social support is a strong buffering mechanism that helps mitigate job demands, entrepreneurs need to be proactive in building a strong network. Individuals who switch to self-employment should carefully map and build a strong social network that can help them weather the challenges and setbacks in their new job.

Originality/value

This study extends the JD–R literature by examining the transition into self-employment, considered an “active job” characterised by high demands and high decision latitude. LGCM modelling captures how both initial levels and changes in social support affect life satisfaction during entrepreneurship entry and over time.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 42 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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