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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2010

Julia B. Edwards, Alan C. McKinnon and Sharon L. Cullinane

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the carbon intensity of “last mile” deliveries (i.e. deliveries of goods from local depots to the home) and personal shopping trips.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the carbon intensity of “last mile” deliveries (i.e. deliveries of goods from local depots to the home) and personal shopping trips.

Design/methodology/approach

Several last mile scenarios are constructed for the purchase of small, non‐food items, such as books, CDs, clothing, cameras and household items. Official government data, operational data from a large logistics service provider, face‐to‐face and telephone interviews with company managers and realistic assumptions derived from the literature form the basis of the calculations. Allowance has been made for home delivery failures, “browsing” trips to the shops and the return of unwanted goods.

Findings

Overall, the research suggests that, while neither home delivery nor conventional shopping has an absolute CO2 advantage, on average, the home delivery operation is likely to generate less CO2 than the typical shopping trip. Nevertheless, CO2 emissions per item for intensive/infrequent shopping trips by bus could match online shopping/home delivery.

Research limitations/implications

The number of items purchased per shopping trip, the choice of travel mode and the willingness to combine shopping with other activities and to group purchases into as few shopping trips or online transactions as possible are shown to be critical factors. Online retailers and home delivery companies could also apply measures (e.g. maximising drop densities and increasing the use of electric vehicles) to enhance the CO2 efficiency of their logistical operations and gain a clearer environmental advantage.

Practical implications

Both consumers and suppliers need to be made more aware of the environmental implications of their respective purchasing behaviour and distribution methods so that potential CO2 savings can be made.

Originality/value

The paper offers insights into the carbon footprints of conventional and online retailing from a “last mile” perspective.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 40 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1987

Richard J. George

This article provides an in‐depth chronology of the development of in‐home electronics shopping, beginning with optimistic predictions of revolutionary growth and possible…

Abstract

This article provides an in‐depth chronology of the development of in‐home electronics shopping, beginning with optimistic predictions of revolutionary growth and possible displacement of traditional retailers, through the acknowledged marketplace failures of two U.S. pioneers of videotex. Included are findings of various research studies and controlled market test results that highlight practical problems associated with this technological innovation in consumer marketing. In addressing the reasons contributing to its disappointing past, the article focuses on the impact of system, organization, product, and demand variables on in‐home electronic shopping. Prestel, the British videotex system, and Minitel, the French videotex system, are described and compared with the commercial efforts of major U.S. corporations. In addition, the article high‐lights the advantages and disadvantages of two leading technologies (television shopping shows and laser videodisc retailing) that currently compete with in‐home electronic shopping for the nonstore retailing market. The article concludes with some cautionary comments and pragmatic suggestions for increasing the probability of commercial success of in‐home electronic shopping.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2011

Hyejune Park, Chae‐Mi Lim, Vertica Bhardwaj and Youn‐Kyung Kim

The purpose of this study is to identify shopper segments based on benefits sought from TV home shopping and profiled the identified segments in consumer characteristics…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify shopper segments based on benefits sought from TV home shopping and profiled the identified segments in consumer characteristics and market behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 887 consumers who had watched a TV home shopping channel was used. The analyses involved running a factor analysis based on benefits sought, a cluster analysis based on the identified factors, and χ 2test and ANOVA for profiling the segments.

Findings

Four benefit segments of TV home shoppers were identified: convenience seekers, product‐oriented shoppers, uniqueness seekers, and apathetic shoppers. Each consumer segment exhibited significant differences in demographic characteristics (i.e. gender, age, education level), consumer characteristics (i.e. time‐consciousness, price‐consciousness), and behavioral outcomes (i.e. satisfaction with TV shopping, repurchase intention).

Research limitations/implications

This study confirms that benefit segmentation can be a useful tool for targeting TV home shoppers. However, the findings of the current study should be interpreted with caution due to non‐random sampling method and limited number of scale items for benefits sought and variables used in describing segments.

Practical implications

The results provide marketing suggestions for each of the benefit segments of TV shoppers.

Originality/value

Considering that virtually no benefit segmentation research has been conducted on TV shoppers, this study provides a new perspective to the segmentation of TV home shoppers.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2017

Johan Hagberg and Ulrika Holmberg

Although the movement of goods by consumers represents a large proportion of the economic and environmental impact of the distribution chain, this topic has been…

Abstract

Purpose

Although the movement of goods by consumers represents a large proportion of the economic and environmental impact of the distribution chain, this topic has been insufficiently explored in the retailing literature. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of shopping travel-mode choice in the context of grocery shopping.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents findings from a Swedish national survey of 1,694 respondents that included questions regarding travel-mode choices and consumer characteristics, mobility conditions, shopping behaviours and environmental interests and engagements.

Findings

This paper shows how travel modes interrelate and how various consumer characteristics, shopping behaviours, mobility conditions and environmental interests and engagements relate to and affect travel-mode choice in grocery shopping. General travel patterns and distance to store are shown to be the most important factors in explaining the mode of transport for grocery shopping.

Originality/value

This paper presents data from a national representative survey and provides novel analyses of travel-mode choices in grocery shopping and the interrelationships among those choices, in addition to the interrelationship between travel-mode choice and the use of home delivery. This paper contributes to a further understanding of consumer mobility in the context of grocery shopping.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 45 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

K.G.B. Bakewell

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes…

Abstract

Compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals published by MCB University Press: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property…

Abstract

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐18; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐18; Property Management Volumes 8‐18; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐18.

Details

Facilities, vol. 19 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Ruby Roy Dholakia and Outi Uusitalo

The shift from physical (brick and mortar) stores and hard copy catalog stores toward electronic stores (e‐tailing) may be seen as a continuous innovation building on past…

Abstract

The shift from physical (brick and mortar) stores and hard copy catalog stores toward electronic stores (e‐tailing) may be seen as a continuous innovation building on past changes brought about by in‐home shopping methods such as catalog, TV and direct mail. Why are e‐tailers then having such difficulty retaining their customers? In this paper, we examine the influence of consumer characteristics on perception of shopping benefits associated with electronic and physical shopping. Based on a mail survey of upscale US households, the empirical study finds the two shopping formats to be clearly different from each other in terms of perceived shopping benefits. The data supports the influence of individual characteristics (such as age, household income and family composition) as well as past behaviors on the shopping benefits associated with the two modes of shopping.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 30 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Jukka Heikkilä, Jukka Kallio, Timo Saarinen and Virpi Kristiina Tuunainen

Increased demand for organized home help for elderly and disabled people and parallel budget cuts of social care require new efficient solutions to save home‐helpers’ time…

Abstract

Increased demand for organized home help for elderly and disabled people and parallel budget cuts of social care require new efficient solutions to save home‐helpers’ time and ensure the current quality of provided services. A number of trials for renewing grocery purchasing process as a part of home help for the elderly and disabled have lately been initiated in Finland. In all but one of these trials electronic commerce (EC) services are included in the purchase process. In this article we compare these trials using the time efficiency of home‐helpers as a primary criterion. Using electronic order delivery gives even additional benefits, releasing the home‐helper from the need to visit the grocery store. The Full EC Model would be the best solution. However, it might not be feasible for most customers, who do not necessarily have the technology or ability to use it. Therefore, the intermediary based EC seems to be most suitable for this customer group.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Christoph Teller, Herbert Kotzab and David B. Grant

To provide empirical evidence and explanation of the phenomenon that providers of home delivery of groceries are still of minor importance in highly concentrated retail markets.

Abstract

Purpose

To provide empirical evidence and explanation of the phenomenon that providers of home delivery of groceries are still of minor importance in highly concentrated retail markets.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a critical literature review three propositions were set up. A web‐based survey was conducted with two prospective consumer groups for home delivery providers: time‐starved consumers and consumers with internet affinity. A structural equation modeling analysis was applied in addition to uni‐ and bivariate analysis.

Findings

In contrast with some assumptions in the literature shopping in stores for groceries was not generally perceived to be an annoying activity. Respondents were aware of their own shopping logistics efforts in terms of spatial and temporal distance when shopping in stores but were unable to convert these efforts into costs. Any perceived inconvenience connected with shopping for groceries had no impact on respondents' willingness to pay for home delivery services or their future intentions to use such services.

Research limitations/implications

The study only investigated two specific consumer groups within highly concentrated urban grocery retail markets. However, these groups may be considered typical of most western European countries and thus the study's findings are of importance to retailers.

Practical implications

The major findings suggest that in general home delivery service may not be considered a strategic competitive advantage in grocery retail markets. Other marketing issues such as pricing, assortment and store personnel still substantially affect a consumer's choice of retail formats. This leads to the conclusion that home delivery providers should either appeal to niche markets and/or offer additional differential criteria compared with traditional retail formats.

Originality/value

The paper argues for a different viewpoint for researchers investigating the topic of internet‐based distance retailing. Further, the reintegration of logistical tasks from consumers should not be considered detached from other format choice criteria.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐17; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐17; Property…

Abstract

Index by subjects, compiled by K.G.B. Bakewell covering the following journals: Facilities Volumes 8‐17; Journal of Property Investment & Finance Volumes 8‐17; Property Management Volumes 8‐17; Structural Survey Volumes 8‐17.

Details

Facilities, vol. 18 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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