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Article

Erika L. Paulson and Mary E. Schramm

This paper aims to explore how home economists, employed by the Good Housekeeping Institute, may have influenced the use of principles from the home economics movement in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how home economists, employed by the Good Housekeeping Institute, may have influenced the use of principles from the home economics movement in advertising appeals for electric appliances.

Design/methodology/approach

A content analysis of more than 400 print advertisements from Good Housekeeping magazine, from 1916 to 1929, was conducted to determine whether manufacturers used appeals derived from the home economics movement in their advertising. Then, the Good Housekeeping Institute’s history is explored to suggest how its relationship with manufacturers may have resulted in the use of the home economics movement’s principles in advertising appeals for electric appliances.

Findings

The content analysis shows that principles of the home economics movement appeared in advertising appeals for electric appliances in advertisements placed in Good Housekeeping magazine during the period studied. Through its unique relationships with electric appliance manufacturers, the Good Housekeeping Institute seems to have taught manufacturers how to position electric appliances by incorporating the principles of the home economics movement in their advertising appeals.

Practical implications

This research demonstrates how a commercial organization successfully navigated its relationships with manufacturers and consumers for mutual benefit.

Originality/value

This work is the first to link the Good Housekeeping Institute’s work with manufacturers to its influence on advertising appeals. This work also expands understanding of the influence of women on marketing practice. Existing literature on women’s publications is also broadened by analyzing Good Housekeeping, rather than the more frequently studied Ladies’ Home Journal.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

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Article

M.O. Aburime and J.O. Uhomoibhi

The purpose of this paper is to examine and report on the impact of technology and culture on home economics and nutrition science education in developing countries with a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine and report on the impact of technology and culture on home economics and nutrition science education in developing countries with a focus on Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

Globally and most especially in developing countries, the advent of information and communication technologies has meant great changes in the manner of thinking and doing things both at home and in business, in education establishments and in society. For higher education institutions especially in developing countries, there has been the introduction of various types of information systems and the implementation of policies to facilitate the integration of new technologies in teaching and administration of new curricula. This paper examines some of these systems and the process of knowledge engineering management of nutrition science and home economics studies at the Delta State University in Nigeria. A study is undertaken of students' level of technological attainments and study approaches.

Findings

The present study reveals that special requirements for applications are important for successful establishment and use of information systems in higher education. Students need to have adequate expertise in technology to become active learners are reported. This will enhance their ability to solve problems and address system requirements. This must be identified at the knowledge engineering stages during curriculum development and be effectively managed.

Research limitations/implications

The current investigation focuses on the impact of technology and culture on two subject areas and in one country. Future work intends to extend this to other disciplines and investigate ways of enhancing education provision to meet the diverse needs of learners of mixed technological abilities and from diverse cultures as applied to other comparative countries.

Practical implications

The paper draws on results obtained from students studying approaches to propose that it is important to design and implement a curriculum that actively promotes the use of systems and technologies that develops such skills as teamwork, communications, project management and lifelong learning.

Originality/value

This work investigates students present technology attainment levels and considers the different learning and studying approaches adopted by students involved in the study of home economic and nutrition science. The learners' attitudes towards engagement with their programmes are examined as well as the impact of technology on learning. Some of the major challenges arising from institutional and individual experiences of the digital divide that permeates all people in developing countries are highlighted.

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

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Article

B. Oogarah‐Pratap, R. Bholah, M. Cyparsade and K. Mathoor

In Mauritius, the school curriculum does not support the need to develop sound nutrition knowledge and food skills to combat the rising incidence of non‐communicable…

Abstract

In Mauritius, the school curriculum does not support the need to develop sound nutrition knowledge and food skills to combat the rising incidence of non‐communicable diseases. This study looks at whether adolescents who had been taught Home Economics had better nutrition knowledge than children who had not. Self‐administered questionnaires were used to collect data from adolescents, Science teachers and Home Economics teachers, randomly selected from 12 co‐educational secondary schools. It was found that the overall nutrition knowledge did not differ significantly. However, Home Economics teaching was associated with better food skills, especially among boys, and was found to be the main source of nutrition‐related information. Opines that active learning methods and Home Economics should become compulsory in all secondary schools. This was the first study of its kind conducted in Mauritius. Findings would be of most value to teachers and policy‐makers in the field of education.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article

Sandra P Fordyce-Voorham

The purpose of this paper is to test an hypothesis that teachers’ personal orientations toward food preparation, nutrition and environmental issues would be related to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test an hypothesis that teachers’ personal orientations toward food preparation, nutrition and environmental issues would be related to their perceived importance of food skills.

Design/methodology/approach

Little research has been conducted on home economics teachers’ views on the importance of the food skills they teach in secondary schools in Australia. Therefore, an online survey was conducted among 261 home economics teachers in Australian secondary schools. The research measured respondents’ ratings of the importance of 70 food skills as well as their teaching preferences and use of resources.

Findings

Respondents rated the procedural “hands-on” skills required to prepare a healthy meal as most important. Exploratory factor analysis derived five components (procedures for domestic settings, procedures for vocational settings, cookery methods, food economy, using microwave oven appliances) relating to teachers’ perceived importance of food skills. Teachers’ personal orientations were described as food aesthete, consumer-environmentalist and nutritionist. The findings showed that these were better predictors of the perceived importance of food skills than demographic characteristics. The most important perceived skills related to the basic procedures required by young people to be able to prepare meals for themselves when living independently. Teachers’ personal “orientations” were significantly related to the perceived importance of food skills. Demographic and professional characteristics were poor predictors of these perceptions.

Originality/value

The findings provide home economics teachers with an understanding of their selection of particular food skills to teach their students in skill-based healthy eating programmes.

Details

Health Education, vol. 116 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article

Jenny Collins

This article examines the national and international connections made by women graduates of the School of Home Science in their efforts to develop the scholarly expertise…

Abstract

This article examines the national and international connections made by women graduates of the School of Home Science in their efforts to develop the scholarly expertise and professional capacity that would enable them to pursue academic careers and to improve the position of women in universities. It argues that despite the obstacles, many women were able to pursue academic pathways and to establish their own authority. By undertaking a transnational analysis, this article examines webs of influence that linked women scholars in New Zealand, Australia, Canada and the United States as well as those in the so called “centre” (Europe and the United Kingdom). It explores the networks formed by a select number of middle class women ‐ scholars such as Ann Gilchrist Strong, Elizabeth Gregory and Neige Todhunter ‐ as they attempted to expand the range of their scholarly work beyond national borders. It considers the influence of appointments of women academics from the United States and the United Kingdom on; the significance of post graduate study opportunities for home science graduates; and the role of scholarships and awards that enabled two way travel between the southern and northern hemispheres. A number of tensions are evident in the way women scholars located their work in new and emerging fields of academic knowledge within the university. This article explores interrelationships between women academics and graduates from the School of Home Science at the University of Otago and academic women in the United Kingdom and the United States. The final section of the paper examines the academic and scholarly life of Catherine Landreth who exemplifies the experience of a select group of women who gained personally, culturally and professionally from their international opportunities, experiences and networks. It considers Landreth’s transnational travels in search of scholarly expertise, the influence of her personal and professional networks, the significance of her pioneering work in the emerging field of early childhood education and the constraints experienced in a highly gendered academic enclave. To begin however it gives a brief overview of the introduction of Home Science at the University of New Zealand and the influence of initial international appointments on the expansion of women’s academic work at the University of Otago.

Details

History of Education Review, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0819-8691

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Article

Mary Ellen Zuckerman

The purpose of this paper is to look at the role played by home economists in providing information to consumers about household products. The work of home economist and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to look at the role played by home economists in providing information to consumers about household products. The work of home economist and educator Martha Van Rensselaer is reviewed, specifically her time as editor of the homemaking department of women's magazine Delineator from 1921‐1926.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper used qualitative analysis of the content of the homemaking department under Van Rensselaer as well as quantitative analysis of the advertising during those years. Documents from several manuscript collections were used as well.

Findings

Content analysis showed a shift over the years from 1921‐1926 from broader social themes to greater emphasis on specific homemaking tasks. Ads were regularly placed next to related editorial content, but under Van Rensselaer no brand names were mentioned editorially.

Research limitations/implications

Since this research focused on one magazine, comparison with homemaking departments in other women's journals at this time would provide useful context.

Originality/value

The specific example provided illuminates the evolving relationship between advertisers, home economists, media and consumers.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

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Article

Elizabeth Parsons

This paper aims to contribute to the project of recognising the contribution of female scholars to the development of marketing thought. The paper presents a biography of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to contribute to the project of recognising the contribution of female scholars to the development of marketing thought. The paper presents a biography of Elizabeth Ellis Hoyt, a home economist, who contributed to the shaping of contemporary ideas about consumption and the consumer.

Design/methodology/approach

Source material used includes the Elizabeth Ellis Hoyt Papers (1884‐2009) in the Iowa State University Archives. The collection contains a variety of materials, of which the most important for this paper were news clippings, personal diaries (1907‐1918), and published and unpublished manuscripts (1953, 1964, n.d.). Also important for this study were two sources published by Alison Comish Thorne, Elizabeth Hoyt's PhD student. These include Thorne's autobiography Leave the Dishes in the Sink and her entry on Elizabeth Hoyt in the Biographical Dictionary of Women Economists.

Findings

The paper documents Elizabeth Hoyt's development of marketing thought, focusing on her early work on the cost of living index and subsequent contributions to an expanded theory of consumption and consumer learning.

Originality/value

Elizabeth Hoyt is one of a group of female home economists who pioneered consumption economics in America in the 1920s and 1930s yet who have been neglected in published accounts. Notwithstanding a short biographical note in the Biographical Dictionary of Women Economists, Hoyt's life and work are not yet documented.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

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Article

Lewis Guodo Liu

The emergence of business information resources and services on the Internet is discussed and its impact on business librarianship. Important resources in various business…

Abstract

The emergence of business information resources and services on the Internet is discussed and its impact on business librarianship. Important resources in various business areas are identified, such as economics, finance, marketing, international business, and real estate. It is argued that business information on the Internet has become a very important part of business information services and that it poses great challenges to business librarianship. Subject knowledge in business has become increasingly crucial for business librarians to effectively identify, evaluate, select, and organise business information on the Internet. Without subject knowledge, or with a lack of subject knowledge in business, business librarians will not be able to maintain the quality of business information services. The article further argues that, given the fact that a large percentage of business librarians in the USA do not have formal training in business, it is time for library and information science schools and libraries to address this issue by setting high standards for recruiting instructors in business information and by setting high standards for employing business librarians.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Book part

Abstract

Details

Documents from F. Taylor Ostrander at Oxford, John R. Commons' Reasonable Value
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84663-906-7

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Article

Kate Darian-Smith and Nikki Henningham

The purpose of this paper is to examine the development of vocational education for girls, focusing on how curriculum and pedagogy developed to accommodate changing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the development of vocational education for girls, focusing on how curriculum and pedagogy developed to accommodate changing expectations of the role of women in the workplace and the home in mid-twentieth century Australia. As well as describing how pedagogical changes were implemented through curriculum, it examines the way a modern approach to girls’ education was reflected in the built environment of the school site and through its interactions with its changing community.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes a case study approach, focusing on the example of the J.H. Boyd Domestic College which functioned as a single-sex school for girls from 1932 until its closure in 1985. Oral history testimony, private archives, photographs and government school records provide the material from which an understanding of the school is reconstructed.

Findings

This detailed examination of the history of J.H. Boyd Domestic College highlights the highly integrated nature of the school's environment with the surrounding community, which strengthened links between the girls and their community. It also demonstrates how important the school's buildings and facilities were to contemporary ideas about the teaching of girls in a vocational setting.

Originality/value

This is the first history of J.H. Boyd Domestic College to examine the intersections of gendered, classed ideas about pedagogy with ideas about the appropriate built environment for the teaching of domestic science. The contextualized approach sheds new light on domestic science education in Victoria and the unusually high quality of the learning spaces available for girls’ education.

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