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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Holly Burkett

Despite heightened interest in return‐on‐investment (ROI) and increased accountability for training professionals to prove their bottom‐line organizational value, many

Abstract

Purpose

Despite heightened interest in return‐on‐investment (ROI) and increased accountability for training professionals to prove their bottom‐line organizational value, many practitioners are deterred from comprehensive measurement and ROI evaluation due to concerns about the cost, time, and human resources necessary to fully implement the process. This article, the second in a two part series, aims to present best practice, cost savings approaches for developing a credible, economical ROI strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

A systemic approach to measuring training's impact begins with an evaluation framework. For purposes of this article, Phillips' (1997) five‐level framework for capturing the financial impact of training programs was referenced. Based upon over 20 years of research and global applications, Phillips' ROI model also includes techniques for isolating the impact of other variables, besides training, upon performance improvement.

Findings

Many organizations around the globe are using cost‐saving approaches so they can begin conducting ROI evaluation within their current budget while others use cost‐saving approaches in order to increase the number of ROI studies they conduct. The ten cost saving approaches for measuring programs at the ROI level have been proven to significantly decrease resource requirements while still providing sound, credible data. Despite these factors, establishing an evaluation culture is no easy task. In many ways, implementing a system‐wide ROI effort is similar to implementing a large‐scale change initiative.

Practical implications

Practical application of these cost‐savings approaches allows the resource‐constrained training function to present their work in terms of financial benefits that leaders understand and have come to expect. It is a vital step in establishing business partnerships that will enhance commitment for training programs, products, and services going forward.

Originality/value

By evaluating training programs with the ROI in mind, training functions can be perceived in a more credible light. Programs aligned with organization strategy are offered, while others that add little value are redesigned and sometimes eliminated. Trainers, designers and developers can use the findings of an ROI evaluation to increase training alignment with business needs and to improve the efficiency of the training design, development, and delivery life cycle.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Holly Burkett

Despite heightened interest in return on investment (ROI) and increased accountability for training professionals to prove their bottom‐line organizational value, many

Abstract

Purpose

Despite heightened interest in return on investment (ROI) and increased accountability for training professionals to prove their bottom‐line organizational value, many practitioners are deterred from comprehensive measurement and ROI evaluation due to concerns about the cost, time, and human resources necessary to fully implement the process. The purpose of this two‐part series is to present ten best practice, cost‐saving approaches for developing a credible, economical ROI strategy.

Design/methodology/approach

A systemic approach to measuring training's impact begins with an evaluation framework. For the purposes of this article, Jack Phillips’ five‐level framework for capturing the financial impact of training programs was referenced. Based on over 20 years of research and global applications, Phillips’ ROI model also includes techniques for isolating the impact of other variables, besides training, on performance improvement.

Findings

Many organizations around the globe are using cost‐saving approaches so they can begin conducting ROI evaluation within their current budget, while others use cost‐saving approaches in order to increase the number of ROI studies they conduct. The ten cost‐saving approaches for measuring programs at the ROI level have been proven to significantly decrease resource requirements while still providing sound, credible data. Despite these factors, establishing an evaluation culture is no easy task. In many ways, implementing a system‐wide ROI effort is similar to implementing a large‐scale change initiative.

Practical implications

Practical application of these cost‐saving approaches allows the resource‐constrained training function to present their work in terms of financial benefits that leaders understand and have come to expect. It is a vital step in establishing business partnerships that will enhance commitment for training programs, products, and services going forward.

Originality/value

By evaluating training programs with the ROI in mind, training functions can be perceived in a more credible light. Programs aligned with organization strategy are offered, while others that add little value are redesigned and sometimes eliminated. Trainers, designers and developers can use the findings of an ROI evaluation to increase training alignment with business needs and to improve the efficiency of the training design, development, and delivery life cycle.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1975

YOU KNOW, of course, what happens when, epigrammatically at least, you have finished going round and round in ever‐diminishing circles. There is a parallel of a kind with…

Abstract

YOU KNOW, of course, what happens when, epigrammatically at least, you have finished going round and round in ever‐diminishing circles. There is a parallel of a kind with copy dead‐lines for monthly library periodicals—in the sense that you start with the tightest possible production schedule, in order to carry the latest news, and then you start sending copy in to the printer earlier and earlier because it's so uncomfortable to have tight dead‐lines, until after a while you find yourself writing the August issue long before the January issue has even appeared.

Details

New Library World, vol. 76 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Georgios I. Zekos

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and…

Abstract

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and its way of using the law in specific circumstances, and shows the variations therein. Sums up that arbitration is much the better way to gok as it avoids delays and expenses, plus the vexation/frustration of normal litigation. Concludes that the US and Greek constitutions and common law tradition in England appear to allow involved parties to choose their own judge, who can thus be an arbitrator. Discusses e‐commerce and speculates on this for the future.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 46 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1949

It has often been said that a great part of the strength of Aslib lies in the fact that it brings together those whose experience has been gained in many widely differing…

Abstract

It has often been said that a great part of the strength of Aslib lies in the fact that it brings together those whose experience has been gained in many widely differing fields but who have a common interest in the means by which information may be collected and disseminated to the greatest advantage. Lists of its members have, therefore, a more than ordinary value since they present, in miniature, a cross‐section of institutions and individuals who share this special interest.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

K. Chandrasekar and R.R. Krishnamurthy

History has taught us that every aspect of the world around us is changing. Right from its formation, the earth has been evolving climatically, edaphically, and biotically…

Abstract

History has taught us that every aspect of the world around us is changing. Right from its formation, the earth has been evolving climatically, edaphically, and biotically to its present state. The forcing for all these changes in the past was natural, and human activities had least influence till the industrial revolution. Since the beginning of the 18th century, human activities associated with the industrial revolution have changed the composition of the atmosphere and thereby having a greater influence on the earth's climate. The use of fossil fuels like coal and oil coupled with deforestation has increased the concentration of heat-trapping “greenhouse gases,” which prevent the heat from the earth escaping to space. Because of this, the very greenhouse gases, which helped sustain life on the earth under normal circumstances, have become detrimental due to its higher concentration. Several models have predicted that the rising concentrations of greenhouse gases produce an increase in the average surface temperature of the earth over time. Rising temperatures may, in turn, produce changes in precipitation patterns, storm severity, and sea level, commonly referred to as “climate change.” The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) defines climate change broadly as “any change in climate over time whether due to natural variability or as a result of human activity.” The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) defines climate change as “a change of climate that is attributed directly or indirectly to human activity, that alters the composition of the global atmosphere, and that is in addition to natural climate variability over comparable time periods.”

Details

Climate Change Adaptation and Disaster Risk Reduction: Issues and Challenges
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-487-1

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