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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Connie Bullis and Hollis Glaser

Describes and positions ecofeminism as a critical voice inpostmodern organizational theory. Ecofeminism, because of itsconnections with spirituality, feminism, and…

Abstract

Describes and positions ecofeminism as a critical voice in postmodern organizational theory. Ecofeminism, because of its connections with spirituality, feminism, and ecology, provides an alternative critique of modernist organizational discourse. Specifically, positions ecofeminism as an antagonistic discourse which should help to define and display limits of bureaucratic discourse. Provides some ecofeminist change strategies.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Bengt Gustavsson and Lars-Johan Åge

This study aims to formulate recommendations for business-to-business (B2B) researchers, with the potential to increase the extent to which B2B research is relevant to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to formulate recommendations for business-to-business (B2B) researchers, with the potential to increase the extent to which B2B research is relevant to managers.

Design/methodology/approach

These recommendations are derived from and inspired by the grounded theory methodology.

Findings

In this article, we argue that conceptualizations which are potentially relevant to managers are those that discover new perspectives, simplify complexity, enable managers to take action and have an instant grab. To accomplish this as researchers, the authors emphasize fostering a beginner’s mind, creating umbrella models, increasing the level of abstraction of concepts and finding the core process in data.

Originality/value

In this article, we translate the basic principles within the grounded theory methodology into more general recommendations that can be used by B2B researchers.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 29 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2021

Michael Shumanov, Holly Cooper and Mike Ewing

The purpose of this study is twofold: first to demonstrate the application of an algorithm using contextual data to ascertain consumer personality traits; and second to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is twofold: first to demonstrate the application of an algorithm using contextual data to ascertain consumer personality traits; and second to explore the factors impacting the relationship between personality traits and advertisement persuasiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-method approach that comprises two distinct yet complementary studies. The first uses quantitative methods and is based on a sample of 35,264 retail banking customers. Study 2 explores the findings that emerge from Study 1 using qualitative methods.

Findings

This paper finds that matching consumer personality with congruent advertising messages can lead to more effective consumer persuasion for most personality types. For consumers who exhibit neurotic personality traits, ameliorating perceived risks during purchasing and providing cues for social acceptance and goal attainment are important factors for advertising effectiveness. These factors also had a positive impact on the purchasing behaviour of extroverted consumers.

Research limitations/implications

This research focusses on understanding purchasing behaviour based on the most dominant personality trait. However, people are likely to exhibit a combination of most or even all of the Big Five personality traits.

Practical implications

Building on advances in natural language processing, enabling the identification of personality from language, this study demonstrates the possibility of influencing consumer behaviour by matching machine inferred personality to congruent persuasive advertising. It is one of the few studies to use contextual instead of social media data to capture individual personality. Such data serves to capture an authentic rather than contrived persona. Further, the study identifies the factors that may moderate this relationship and thereby provides an explanation of why some personality traits exhibit differences in purchasing behaviour from those that are anticipated by existing theory.

Originality/value

Although the idea that people are more likely to be responsive to advertising messages that are congruent with their personality type has already been successfully applied by advertising practitioners and documented by advertising scholars, this study extends existing research by identifying the factors that may moderate this relationship and thereby provides an explanation why some personality traits may exhibit differences in purchasing behaviour from those that are anticipated by existing theory.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2018

Una Mairead Barr

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of assisted desistance from the perspective of women involved in the criminal justice system. It focusses on two community…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of assisted desistance from the perspective of women involved in the criminal justice system. It focusses on two community projects set up in the aftermath of the 2007 Corston Report, Northshire Women’s Centres (WCs) and the Housing for Northshire project.

Design/methodology/approach

Through analysis of a year of observation in these settings and 23 narrative interviews with staff and service users, the paper notes the differences between risk-focussed and desistance-focussed justice for women.

Findings

Neither projects are a panacea; however, they offer an insight into desistance-focussed practice. The findings would suggest that the projects provide social justice as opposed to criminal justice, particularly because of their flexible approach and awareness of the relational elements involved in female desistance.

Originality/value

The in-depth, qualitative data provided challenges the “payment by results” rhetoric which demands positivist research that promotes an understanding of desistance as a binary outcome. Implications for policy are considered.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 13 September 2017

William L. Waugh

International humanitarian assistance usually arrives quickly following a catastrophic disaster, although it may be slower to remote locations. The international community…

Abstract

International humanitarian assistance usually arrives quickly following a catastrophic disaster, although it may be slower to remote locations. The international community has developed guidelines to reduce the social and cultural intrusiveness of the aid, assuring that local priorities are followed and the aid facilitates long-term recovery. However, the aid missions are under pressure to act quickly and withdraw because of the expense of operations, and thus, they are less sensitive to local culture and priorities than they might be. This chapter looks at the political context of international humanitarian assistance, including the Hyogo and Sendai Frameworks and humanitarian standards, and the experience in several catastrophic disaster responses in Asia. Levels of satisfaction with recovery, particularly housing recovery, were related to the affected communities’ participation in the decision-making process. Humanitarian aid standards also encourage attention to issues of security, displaced populations, equity in the distribution of aid, the safety of women and children, and other disaster impacts.

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1992

HOWARD JOHNSON

Alongside the ubiquitous computer games apparently the marketing success of the 1992 toy season was a series of 25 year old puppets who had featured in a repeat showing of…

Abstract

Alongside the ubiquitous computer games apparently the marketing success of the 1992 toy season was a series of 25 year old puppets who had featured in a repeat showing of the orginal ITV series on BBC — Thunderbirds — more than 70 franchises have been sold to sell goods marked with the International Rescue logo and it is alleged that these products are even bigger than the previous smash marketing hit the Teenage Mutant Ninja turtles, saving thousands of jobs and making substantial profits for the British toy industry. The characters are licensed for right‐owners ITC (originally the international marketing arm of ATV, the ITV company which put out the programme, and now an independent company, ATV having long since lost its ITV franchise) by Copyright Promotions, Europe's largest licensing company (‘Thunderbirds are go to save the toy industry’ Sunday Telegraph 15/11/92).

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Hilary Brown, Sophie Burns and Margaret Flynn

This paper reports some preliminary lessons from a qualitative study of services that have cared for a person with learning disabilities during a terminal illness. It…

Abstract

This paper reports some preliminary lessons from a qualitative study of services that have cared for a person with learning disabilities during a terminal illness. It reflects current concern about access to health care as well as the national priority being placed on improvements in cancer services for all patients. The study documents how the service learned of the person's illness, how they mobilised services and made decisions, how agencies worked together (or not!) and what support staff needed in the person's last months and weeks. It also considers the way staff, as individuals and as teams, made sense of their experiences and evaluated the input of other professionals.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2014

Katherine M. Tsui, Eric McCann, Amelia McHugh, Mikhail Medvedev, Holly A. Yanco, David Kontak and Jill L. Drury

The authors believe that people with cognitive and motor impairments may benefit from using of telepresence robots to engage in social activities. To date, these systems…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors believe that people with cognitive and motor impairments may benefit from using of telepresence robots to engage in social activities. To date, these systems have not been designed for use by people with disabilities as the robot operators. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted two formative evaluations using a participatory action design process. First, the authors conducted a focus group (n=5) to investigate how members of the target audience would want to direct a telepresence robot in a remote environment using speech. The authors then conducted a follow-on experiment in which participants (n=12) used a telepresence robot or directed a human in a scavenger hunt task.

Findings

The authors collected a corpus of 312 utterances (first hand as opposed to speculative) relating to spatial navigation. Overall, the analysis of the corpus supported several speculations put forth during the focus group. Further, it showed few statistically significant differences between speech used in the human and robot agent conditions; thus, the authors believe that, for the task of directing a telepresence robot's movements in a remote environment, people will speak to the robot in a manner similar to speaking to another person.

Practical implications

Based upon the two formative evaluations, the authors present four guidelines for designing speech-based interfaces for telepresence robots.

Originality/value

Robot systems designed for general use do not typically consider people with disabilities. The work is a first step towards having our target population take the active role of the telepresence robot operator.

Details

International Journal of Intelligent Computing and Cybernetics, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-378X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 29 July 2009

Lawton R. Burns, Rajiv J. Shah, Frank A. Sloan and Adam C. Powell

Change in ownership among U.S. community hospitals has been frequent and, not surprisingly, remains an important issue for both researchers and public policy makers. In…

Abstract

Change in ownership among U.S. community hospitals has been frequent and, not surprisingly, remains an important issue for both researchers and public policy makers. In the past, investor-owned hospitals were long suspected of pursuing financial over other goals, culminating in several reviews that found few differences between for-profit and nonprofit forms (Gray, 1986; Sloan, 2000; Sloan, Picone, Taylor, & Chou, 2001). Nevertheless, continuing to the present day, several states prohibit investor-ownership of community hospitals. Conversions to investor-ownership are only one of six types of ownership change, however, with relatively less attention paid to the other types (e.g., for-profit to nonprofit, public to nonprofit). This study has two parts. We first review the literature on the various types of ownership conversion among community hospitals. This review includes the rate at which conversions occur over time, the relative frequency in conversions between specific ownership categories and the observed effects of conversion on hospital operations (e.g., strategic direction and decision-making processes) and performance (e.g., access, quality, and cost). Overall, we find that the impact of ownership conversion on the different measures is mixed, with slightly greater evidence for positive effects on hospital efficiency. As one explanation for these findings, we suggest that the impact of ownership conversion on hospital performance may be mediated by changes in the hospital's strategic content and process. Such a hypothesis has not been proposed or examined in the literature. To address this gap, we next study the role of strategic reorientation following hospital conversion in a field study. We conceptualize ownership conversion within a strategic adaptation framework, and then analyze the changes in strategy content and process across sixteen hospitals that have undergone ownership conversions from nonprofit to for-profit, public to for-profit, public to nonprofit, and for-profit to nonprofit. The field study findings delineate the strategic paths and processes implemented by new owners post-conversion. We find remarkable similarity in the content of strategies undertaken but differences in the process of strategic decision making associated with different types of ownership changes. We also find three main performance effects: hospitals change ownership for financial reasons, experience increases in revenues and capital investment post-conversion, and pursue labor force reductions post-conversion. Membership in a multi-hospital system, however, may be a major determinant of both strategy content and decision-making process that is confounded with ownership change. That is, ownership conversion may mask the impact of system membership on a hospital's strategic actions. These findings may explain the pattern of performance effects observed in the literature on ownership conversions.

Details

Biennial Review of Health Care Management: Meso Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-673-7

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Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2003

C.J McNair, Lidija Polutnik, Holly H Johnston, Jason Augustyn and Charles R Thomas

The objective of the research, and paper, is to determine first whether or not the accounting abstraction appears to dominate the manager’s perceptions of the physical…

Abstract

The objective of the research, and paper, is to determine first whether or not the accounting abstraction appears to dominate the manager’s perceptions of the physical reality of the firm’s utilization of its physical assets, and second, whether changes in the accounting abstraction (e.g. the addition of Capacity cost management reports and measurements) lead to changes in how managers perceive, and use, their physical assets. Using a cognitive decision-making structure developed by Wagenaar et al. (1995), this study explores the interplay between the structure and nature of capacity reporting (the surface structure of the decision) and the subsequent analysis and choice of managers within the firm (the deep structure of the decision). A five-site field research methodology was used to gather data from companies across a multitude of industry contexts and situations. Results suggest that the nature of capacity measurement and reporting does shape manager’s perceptions of current and potential future performance (the cognitive surface structure), with major implications for the nature and type of decisions and trade-offs made (the deep structure). Specifically, managers appear to make decisions that are illogical when considered in light of the physical reality of their operations based on the representations of this reality (e.g. the capacity measures and reports). Analysis and interpretation of these results suggest that what accounting makes visible appears to drive decision-making and performance in organization.

Details

Advances in Management Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-207-8

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