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Article
Publication date: 31 October 2018

Nguyen Huu Khoi, Ho Huy Tuu and Svein Ottar Olsen

The purpose of this paper is to discuss and test the direct and indirect effects of utilitarian, hedonic and social values integrated into the theory of planned behaviour…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss and test the direct and indirect effects of utilitarian, hedonic and social values integrated into the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) to achieve a deeper understanding of consumers’ intention to adopt mobile commerce (MC) in the context of a developing country, Vietnam.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on self-administered survey data of 382 Vietnamese consumers, a structural equation modelling approach with latent constructs is used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Perceived values explain consumer attitudes, subjective norms and behavioural intentions in the MC context. In particular, they help to increase the explained variance of the intention to adopt MC by about 9.58 per cent compared with the TPB. Finally, a cross-effect on consumer attitudes from subjective norms is also found.

Research limitations/implications

Future studies would benefit from investigating other variables (e.g. innovativeness or trust) and using actual behaviour (e.g. online purchases).

Practical implications

Business managers should pay attention to different forms of consumer values to understand how and why consumers adopt MC in a developing country.

Originality/value

This study fills the gap in the literature by simultaneously investigating the role of utilitarian, hedonic and social value in a TPB model in the MC context.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Ho Huy Tuu, Svein Ottar Olsen and Le Chi Cong

The purpose of this paper is to discuss and test the combined effects of openness to experience (OE) and power, and the moderator effects of social norms (SN) and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss and test the combined effects of openness to experience (OE) and power, and the moderator effects of social norms (SN) and perceived resources on the choice of luxury attributes for branded products in Vietnam.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a self-administered survey data of 207 Vietnamese consumers, a structural equation modeling approach for moderator analysis with latent constructs is used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

OE and power have both direct and interactive positive influences on the choice of luxury product attributes. In particular, the effect of OE is weakened by the negative moderator effect of SN, but the effect of power is strengthened by the positive moderator effect of perceived resources. The inclusion of interactions increases the explained variance of the choice of luxury product attributes from 24.8 to 35.8 percent.

Research limitations/implications

Future studies would benefit to investigate other personality traits (e.g. extroversion or agreeableness), personal values (e.g. achievement), SN (e.g. descriptive norms) and resources (e.g. time).

Practical implications

The study findings suggest that brand managers should attend the how individual and social factors interacts in explaining the choice of luxury product attributes.

Originality/value

This study is the first discussing, testing and finding empirical evidence supporting the combined effects of OE and power on the choice of luxury product attributes as well as moderator effects in these relationships.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 30 June 2020

Lars Moksness, Svein Ottar Olsen and Ho Huy Tuu

This study aims to explore the role of habit strength in explaining intention and open access (OA) and non-OA scholarly publishing.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the role of habit strength in explaining intention and open access (OA) and non-OA scholarly publishing.

Design/methodology/approach

A decomposed theory of planned behaviour (TPB) is used as the conceptual framework to investigate a sample of 1,588 researchers from the major universities in Norway. Different latent construct models are analysed with a structural equation modelling approach.

Findings

The results show that the effect of habit was non-significant in an extended TPB framework where attitude was most important, followed by norms and perceived behavioural control in explaining intention to submit OA. Habit was only found to have a significant impact on intention to submit OA when it played a role as a full mediator for the effects of the intentional antecedents. In this modified model, norms were found to have a stronger effect than attitudes in explaining the habit to submit OA. OA habit strength forms intentions to publish in OA journals and reduces the intention to publish and publishing behaviour in NOA journals.

Research limitations/implications

Other individual forces (e.g. personality and personal values) and the role of habit strength should be included for future research.

Practical implications

The results provide empirical insights to management, policy makers and research on scholarly publishing.

Originality/value

This paper contributes not only to the understanding of OA scholarly publishing, but is also relevant for research on what drives (academic) data sharing, knowledge sharing, the sharing economy or the open source movement.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 76 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2013

Ho Huy Tuu and Svein Ottar Olsen

The purpose of this paper is to explore the combined moderator role of consideration set size (CSS) and variety seeking (VS) on the satisfaction-loyalty relationship, and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the combined moderator role of consideration set size (CSS) and variety seeking (VS) on the satisfaction-loyalty relationship, and uses theories and findings mostly from the brand literature to test some hypotheses at a product category level.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use survey data of 487 Vietnamese consumers in a food context. A structural equation modelling (SEM) approach for moderator analysis with latent constructs is used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

CSS has a positive effect on CRL, while VS has a negative effect on CRL. CSS is found to have a positive moderator effect on the category satisfaction-category repurchase loyalty relationship. More interestingly, CSS still interacts with VS to positively influence this relationship.

Research limitations/implications

The object and setting of this study is limited to one product category in one market. The nature of causality is problematic due to the use of survey design.

Practical implications

Those findings imply that a product category extension with alternatives providing complementary benefits will have a higher chance of success with satisfied consumers, especially those with high VS, than with less satisfied consumers.

Social implications

The study recommends that people should vary their diet to achieve different kinds of vitamins, minerals and tastes for their health. Similarly, the tourism industry should satisfy tourists ' variety-seeking needs by exploring new categories.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by discussing and highlighting positive moderator effects of CSS and VS on the satisfaction-loyalty relationship at a product category level. The findings are contrast with brand literature which confirms negative moderator effects of CSS and VS on this relationship.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2011

Ho Huy Tuu, Svein Ottar Olsen and Pham Thi Thuy Linh

This study aims to discuss and test the combined role of perceived risk, objective knowledge and certainty as moderators in the satisfaction‐loyalty relationship.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to discuss and test the combined role of perceived risk, objective knowledge and certainty as moderators in the satisfaction‐loyalty relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use survey data of 387 Vietnamese consumers in a food context. A structural equation modeling (SEM) approach for moderator analysis with latent constructs is used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Perceived risk is a barrier in the forming of loyalty with a negative moderating effect on the satisfaction‐loyalty relationship. However, the satisfaction‐loyalty relationship is stronger when objective knowledge and certainty increase.

Research limitations/implications

The object and setting are limited to one product category in one market. In addition, other moderators (e.g. situation and ambivalence) can be added. The nature of causality is problematic due to the use of survey design.

Practical implications

Customer management based on satisfaction is not sufficient to keep customers' loyalty, especially in the situations of highly perceived risk and uncertainty. Marketing strategies, which reduce consumers' risks, consolidate their confidence and educate them with relevant knowledge, may be effective strategies to increase their loyalty.

Originality/value

The study fills several gaps in the present literature. First, it overcomes some shortcomings of previous studies of moderators in the satisfaction‐loyalty relationship by testing the combined role of three important moderators. Second, it tests the moderator effect of objective knowledge and adds an extra explanation to previous studies. While some previous studies suggest a negative moderator effect of subjective knowledge, this paper argues for and confirms a positive moderator effect of objective knowledge on this relationship. Finally, it uses SEM for moderator analysis with latent constructs.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 January 2012

Ho Huy Tuu and Svein Ottar Olsen

The purpose of this paper is to examine the roles of perceived certainty, manipulated risk and knowledge in the satisfaction‐purchase intention relationship in the context…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the roles of perceived certainty, manipulated risk and knowledge in the satisfaction‐purchase intention relationship in the context of a new product evaluation.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a 2×2 factorial design with 120 participants and a combination of methods to test hypotheses.

Findings

The respondents of low‐risk as well as high‐knowledge groups report a higher purchase intention. Interestingly, the movement from satisfaction to purchase intention is higher among respondents with higher certainty, and among respondents in low‐risk as well as high‐knowledge groups. In particular, this study finds a positive interaction effect between manipulated knowledge and manipulated risk on the satisfaction‐purchase intention relationship.

Research limitations/implications

As with most experiments, this study has low external validity. Thus, future studies should use different products/brands tested among a wider range of consumers and in more realistic user situations. Both product risk and consumer knowledge are multidimensional constructs, thus, it will be interesting for future studies to manipulate different facets of those constructs (e.g. financial risk, procedural knowledge).

Practical implications

The authors' findings suggest that managers should be aware of satisfaction strength (e.g. confidence and knowledge) and risk in their estimations of purchase intention based on satisfaction measurement. Marketing strategies that reduce consumers' risks, consolidate their confidence and educate them with relevant knowledge may be effective strategies to increase their purchase intentions, especially towards new products.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by simultaneously examining the roles of perceived certainty, manipulated risk and knowledge within a satisfaction‐purchase intention relationship. It also contributes by providing empirical evidence supporting an interaction between knowledge and risk affecting the satisfaction‐purchase intention relationship. Finally, it uses a controlled experiment in the context of a new product evaluation to confirm the causal effects.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2009

Ho Huy Tuu and Svein Ottar Olsen

The purpose of this paper is to test the relationships among perceived risk, consumer satisfaction and repurchase loyalty, and to explore the moderating role of knowledge…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the relationships among perceived risk, consumer satisfaction and repurchase loyalty, and to explore the moderating role of knowledge on the relationship between these constructs.

Design/methodology/approach

The results are based on a cross‐section sample of 846 households in Vietnam using self‐administrating questionnaires, with fish as a main research object, and analyzed using structural equation modelling.

Findings

The relationship between perceived risk and satisfaction is negative and satisfaction has a significantly positive effect on repurchase loyalty. This study suggests that perceived risk has an indirect effect on repurchase loyalty through satisfaction. Besides direct effects on perceived risk and satisfaction, knowledge proves to moderate negatively both the relationship between perceived risk and satisfaction, and the relationship between satisfaction and repurchase loyalty.

Research limitations/implications

This study mainly focuses on fish as a common food and considers the role of food risk with an emphasis on perceived health risk and subjective knowledge. Thus, future study should include other dimensions of risk, objective knowledge and other products. Other antecedents toward repurchase loyalty (e.g. price/value) or other moderators (e.g. ambivalence, personal characteristics) should be used in future studies.

Practical implications

Management attention should focus on reducing risks with which consumers may be faced through producing fresh or safe fish products, and communicating broadly safe signals of their products. Communication strategy should focus much more on improving knowledge and signing food safety for consumers with lower knowledge than the others.

Originality/value

This is believed to be the first study to empirically examine the combined role of perceived risk and knowledge within a satisfaction‐loyalty framework in the Vietnamese market.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 January 2013

Abstract

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 May 2021

Davood Ghorbanzadeh

Satisfaction and loyalty as vital and strategic concepts in marketing literature are highly important to companies and marketers. The review of the existing literature…

Abstract

Purpose

Satisfaction and loyalty as vital and strategic concepts in marketing literature are highly important to companies and marketers. The review of the existing literature reveals a gap of the role of emotional constructs that can begin in a regular and rational sequence of satisfaction and ultimately lead to the formation of consumer loyalty. Hence, in the current study, we seek to answer the question of whether emotional constructs such as emotional attachment and love play a mediating role in the process of transitioning from satisfaction to loyalty in the correct sequence.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 300 valid questionnaires on Smartphone and apparel brands were collected from respondents and analyzed using the partial least squares method.

Findings

The results showed that brand love is the strongest antecedent of brand loyalty and is the only variable that directly influences brand loyalty in comparison to satisfaction and emotional brand attachment. Moreover, the examination of indirect effects revealed that our assumption based on that the emotional structures such as emotional attachment and brand love play a mediating role in the process of transitioning from satisfaction to loyalty in a correct sequence is supported.

Research limitations/implications

Generalizability needs to be established with a wider range of consumer groups. The survey was conducted in Iran and future research should assess the same product categories in other cultural settings as well as consider other product categories to assess the external validity of these results. The insights on consumers' brand relationships help brand managers devise effective brand management strategies.

Practical implications

The managerial implications can guide managers toward enhancing the consumers' loyalty to the brand through a better understanding of the consumer loyalty process to a brand as well as better relational marketing practices.

Originality/value

The study validates the mediating role of emotional brand attachment and brand love in the relationship between brand satisfaction and brand loyalty; is one of the first to develop a conceptual model that examines the role of emotional structures in the process of transition from satisfaction to loyalty.; is one of few studies to develop the role of emotional structures in the form of a relational chain of brands in the process of transition from satisfaction to loyalty.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2021

Junyun Liao, Muhua Li, Haiying Wei and Zelin Tong

Recent years have witnessed the increasingly fierce competition amongst smartphone brands. Hence, smartphone firms urge to prevent current consumers from switching to…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent years have witnessed the increasingly fierce competition amongst smartphone brands. Hence, smartphone firms urge to prevent current consumers from switching to maintain market position. Based on the push–pull–mooring (PPM) framework, this study aims to explore the drivers of users' intentions to switch from their current smartphone brands.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on previous literature and the characteristics of the smartphone purchase, this study identified one pushing, two pulling and five mooring factors. Online questionnaires were collected to test hypotheses using the structural equation modelling approach. An additional netnography study provides further support to the hypotheses.

Findings

Results show that regret is a push factor that enhances consumers' switching intentions. Moreover, two pull factors, subjective norms and alternative attractiveness positively influence consumers' switching intentions. Finally, switching costs, emotional commitment and brand community engagement are mooring factors that negatively affect brand-switching intention, whereas consumers' variety seeking has a positive effect.

Originality/value

This study enriches the brand switching literature and offers significant implications for customer retention.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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