Search results

1 – 10 of 15
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 December 2007

Syed Shah Alam, Ali Khatibi, Mohd. Ismail Sayyed Ahmad and Hishamuddin Bin Ismail

This paper sets out to examine the factors influencing internet‐based e‐commerce in the electronic manufacturing companies in Malaysia.

Downloads
4343

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to examine the factors influencing internet‐based e‐commerce in the electronic manufacturing companies in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample data are derived from a questionnaire survey of 194 companies selected from the Federation of Malaysian Manufacturer lists to investigate the study hypotheses. Roger's five innovation diffusion characteristics were considered as factors that affect EC adoption and security/confidentiality was taken as an additional factor for this study.

Findings

The multiple regression analysis results indicate that relative advantage, compatibility, complexity, observability and security appear significant. Relative advantage and compatibility have positive and significant influence on EC adoption whereas complexity and security have negative effects. This study also revealed a non‐significant relationship between trialability and e‐commerce adoption.

Research limitations/implications

The results are limited within the sample of electronic manufacturing companies in Malaysia, so the results cannot be generalized.

Originality/value

This study provides a greater understanding of managers' perception of e‐commerce adoption in their manufacturing companies. Those interested in promoting their business online may find these results helpful in guiding their efforts.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 17 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2013

Tuan‐Hock Ng, Lee‐Lee Chong and Hishamuddin Ismail

The purpose of this paper is to identify the relationships between risk management committee characteristics and risk taking of the Malaysia's insurance companies, from…

Downloads
2625

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the relationships between risk management committee characteristics and risk taking of the Malaysia's insurance companies, from 2003‐2011. The paper aims to examine three identified characteristics of a risk management committee, namely, size, independence, and number of meetings.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample comprises 329 observations throughout the nine years' time frame until 2011. Pearson's correlation, pooled ordinary least squares regression, and panel regression model are used in this study. Sensitivity testing with an alternative measure of underwriting risk is also performed.

Findings

Out of the three characteristics, size and committee independence appear to be negatively associated with underwriting risk. Meanwhile, the frequency of risk management committee meetings is insignificant in this study.

Research limitations/implications

The sample of this study is limited to the Malaysia's insurance sector only.

Originality/value

A risk management committee is an influencing force for risk oversight and the internal control system. The empirical evidence enriches the understanding of corporate governance in the context of the role of a risk management committee.

Details

The Journal of Risk Finance, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1526-5943

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 August 2011

Sharimllah Devi Ramachandran, Siong Choy Chong and Hishamuddin Ismail

The main objective of this paper to study the organisational culture (OC) in private and public higher education institutions (HEIs) from the perspective of faculty…

Downloads
24512

Abstract

Purpose

The main objective of this paper to study the organisational culture (OC) in private and public higher education institutions (HEIs) from the perspective of faculty members in order to provide empirical insights on the differences and consequently pave an avenue for cross‐learning.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 594 faculty members (33.9 per cent from public HEIs and 52.8 per cent from private HEIs) using the competing values framework (CVF).

Findings

The factor analysis results reveal an important confirmation of the theoretical findings in the literature with respect to the four OC types (i.e. clan, adhocracy, hierarchical, and market) that were originally developed for use in the corporate sector. The independent sample t‐test results suggest that the faculty members perceive all the four OC types as being significantly different between public and private HEIs.

Practical implications

This paper raises awareness and provides initial guidelines to both public and private HEIs in formulating strategies on how to deal properly with their OC from the perspective of their faculty members for the attainment of organisational goals and vision.

Originality/value

This article extends knowledge on OC differences between the public and private higher education – an enabler for change management of sorts. Being among the first of its kind, it further opens up new lines of future research possibilities.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Zauwiyah Ahmad, Hishamuddin Ismail and R. N. Anantharaman

The purpose of this paper is to study accounting students’ intentions to pursue their careers as accountants and modelling this within the context of Malaysian accounting…

Downloads
2016

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study accounting students’ intentions to pursue their careers as accountants and modelling this within the context of Malaysian accounting education.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered via a questionnaire survey involving undergraduate accounting students. Factor analysis, independent sample t-tests, and multiple regressions were employed.

Findings

In total, four findings were derived from this study. First, within the undergraduate accounting programmes, non-commitment towards the accounting profession can still exist. Second, intrinsic interest is a significant predictor of career intentions. Third, the influence of anticipated conflict provides a new finding in relation to accounting students’ career intentions. The last finding is concerned with the influence of internship experience on students’ career intentions.

Research limitations/implications

It was assumed that differences detected between the accounting student cohorts reflect changes over time in students’ intentions.

Practical implications

Suggestions that have been previously put forward in efforts to market the accounting profession were mainly focused on promoting the extrinsic rewards. However, findings from this study suggested that sole focus on extrinsic rewards is not enough to warrant commitment towards the profession. Instead, marketing efforts should also focus on intrinsic values of the profession.

Originality/value

The study has provided evidence that anticipated conflict should be given more attention by accounting researchers. Although students’ career intentions seemed to become clearer and more uniform as they progressed with their studies, two issues remain to be addressed by education institutions and accounting professional bodies, namely anticipated conflict and the conduct of internship programme.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 57 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 August 2009

Sharimllah Devi Ramachandran, Siong Choy Chong and Hishamuddin Ismail

The objective of this paper is to investigate and compare the practices of knowledge management (KM) processes, which have been grounded in the KM literature, between

Downloads
3532

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this paper is to investigate and compare the practices of knowledge management (KM) processes, which have been grounded in the KM literature, between public and private higher education institutions (HEIs).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 594 academics from three public and three private HEIs in Malaysia.

Findings

The analyses suggest that all the six KM processes (knowledge creation, capture, organisation, storage, dissemination, and application) are moderately practiced by the institutions surveyed and that there are significant differences in the overall practices of KM processes between the public and private HEIs.

Practical implications

This paper raises awareness and provides initial guidelines to the HEIs as knowledge‐intensive organisations in formulating strategies on how to properly implement and manage their KM processes.

Originality/value

This study has extended knowledge in KM for it is probably the first to provide a comparative analysis between public and private HEIs. It further opens up new lines of future research possibilities.

Details

VINE, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 August 2013

Tuan Hock Ng, Lee Lee Chong and Hishamuddin Ismail

The purpose of this paper is to provide insights on how a firm's size is related to risk taking of Malaysia's insurance companies, from 2000‐2010.

Downloads
2503

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insights on how a firm's size is related to risk taking of Malaysia's insurance companies, from 2000‐2010.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample used for empirical testing in this study comprised direct insurance firms licensed under Malaysia's Insurance Act 1996, for the time frame between 2000 and 2010. Pearson's correlation, fixed and random effects models, and the system Generalized Method of Moments (GMM) method were used in this study.

Findings

Both the fixed effects and the system GMM panel data regression models suggested a positive link between the insurance firm size and underwriting risk. For the robustness test, the results of the analysis using changes in data broadly resemble the outputs of the levels estimation.

Research limitations/implications

The sample of this study is limited to Malaysia's insurance sector only.

Originality/value

Advocates of the too‐big‐to‐fail (TBTF) theory believe that government support and the guarantee of a financial bailout are warranted for large financial institutions facing crises, for the main purpose of avoiding disruptions within a country's economy. The drawback, however, may be that the TBTF doctrine is the culprit behind excessive risk taking by insurance firms of large proportions. A number of regulatory concerns have been raised and addressed from this study.

Details

The Journal of Risk Finance, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1526-5943

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 31 December 2007

Kate Snowden

Downloads
798

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 17 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 July 2012

Mohammed Abdulai Mahmoud and Baba Yusif

Nonprofit organisations (NPOs) are challenged with continuous change, which provides the impetus for adopting organisational change models. The purpose of this paper is to…

Downloads
3572

Abstract

Purpose

Nonprofit organisations (NPOs) are challenged with continuous change, which provides the impetus for adopting organisational change models. The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of the adoption of market and learning orientations on NPO performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors draw on extant management literature to theorise the interrelationship between market orientation, learning orientation, and economic and non‐economic NPO performance. Using a survey design, the authors draw a convenience sample of 118 NPOs in Ghana to test their theoretisation.

Findings

Evidence is found that although the relationship between market orientation and NPO performance is significant (on both economic and non‐economic indicators), what best accounts for enhanced performance is learning orientation. Additionally, non‐economic performance mediates the relationship between learning orientation and economic performance.

Research limitations/implications

Replicating the study with larger samples, using objective performance data, and applying more rigorous approach to data analysis, among other things, could significantly improve the generalisability of the results.

Practical implications

NPO managers are reminded that non‐economic performance (e.g. service or program effectiveness) represents part of the underlying mechanism through which the financial assurances of market and learning orientations can be exploited.

Originality/value

The paper builds on the market orientation literature by theorising and demonstrating empirically a route through which market orientation is related to the firm's financial performance.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 61 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

Su Peng Loh, Hishamuddin Omar, Abdul Salam Abdullahl and Maznah Ismail

The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of calcium supplementation on the iron bioavailability from spirulina (SP) and ferrous sulphate (FE) as reference in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of calcium supplementation on the iron bioavailability from spirulina (SP) and ferrous sulphate (FE) as reference in iron deficient rats.

Design/methodology/approach

Sixty‐four weanling male Sprague‐Dawley rats were first depleted of iron by giving low iron diet for a period of 28 days. The anaemic rats were repleted with iron sources from SP, spirulina+CaCO3 (SPC), FE, FeSO4+CaCO3 (FEC), normal diet (ND), normal diet+CaCO3 (NDC) for 21 days. Iron level of FE supplementation was twice the level of that in SP supplementation. Haematological variables were measured on the last day of preexperimental period and at the end of the repletion period.

Findings

Paired samples t‐test at P<0.05 showed that haemoglobin (Hb) and haematocrit (Ht) was increased in all the groups. The diet with added calcium did not significantly inhibit haemoglobin repletion after 21 days in SP and FE. The haemoglobin repletion efficiency (HRE) was significantly higher in rats fed with SP compared to FE (P>0.05). The presence of calcium did not significantly reduce the HRE of these groups.

Originality/value

This paper provides information on effects of additional calcium on iron bioavailability from SP as the intake of dietary supplementation is increasing worldwide.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 March 2009

Khong Sin Tan, Siong Choy Chong, Binshan Lin and Uchenna Cyril Eze

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the innovative characteristics, benefits, and barriers influencing internet‐based information and communications technology…

Downloads
7634

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the innovative characteristics, benefits, and barriers influencing internet‐based information and communications technology (ICT) adoption among the small and medium enterprises (SMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire‐based survey was used to collect data from 406 managers or owners of SMEs in the southern region of Malaysia.

Findings

The results suggest that internet‐based ICT adoption provides a low cost yet effective communication tool for customers. However, security continues to be a major barrier. Finding on cost as a barrier is mixed. The inferential statistics reveal that relative advantage, compatibility, complexity, observability, and security are significant factors influencing internet‐based ICT adoption.

Research limitations/implications

The study focuses only on the SMEs in the southern region of Malaysia.

Practical implications

The findings offer valuable insights to policy makers in general and to the SMEs in particular on the significance of the measured characteristics and the associated benefits and barriers of internet‐based ICT adoption.

Originality/value

The study is perhaps one of the first to comprehensively address internet‐based ICT adoption among the SMEs through the use of a wide range of variables.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 109 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

1 – 10 of 15