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Article
Publication date: 20 December 2017

Tien-Chi Huang, Yu-Lin Jeng, Chieh Hsu and Chin-Feng Lai

The purpose of this paper is to introduce an affective computing-based method of identifying sleeping beauties and their princes in five educational technology journals.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce an affective computing-based method of identifying sleeping beauties and their princes in five educational technology journals.

Design/methodology/approach

This study develops an information technology-based methodology to analyze sleeping beauties in the field of educational technology. The authors seek to determine the characteristics of studies which trigger the awakening of sleeping beauties (called “princes”). The keywords and Hirsch index (H-index) are used as two essential analysis indicators.

Findings

Between 2000 and 2015, these five journals included 7,864 articles with a total of 77,700 citations and 24,312 keywords. This study identified articles as being in deep sleep (75.7 percent), less deep sleep (14.7 percent), and awakening (5.5 percent) states. According to the analytical results, 431 of 7,864 articles are qualified as “sleeping beauties.” Of the 431 sleeping beauties identified, 232 articles were awakened by trend princes, while 286 were awakened by H-index princes. A total of 128 sleeping beauties were awakened by both prince types. Besides, impact factors (IFs) of journals do not have a significant effect on the number of sleeping articles.

Research limitations/implications

There are two main research limitations in this study. The first one is the amount of target journals. Only five well-known educational technology journals are analyzed in this research. There may be more valuable sleeping publications in other journals not been found. The second limitation is that the authors merely pick up the lead author of citing papers as the indicator to determine the H-index prince. The contributions of the rest of authors are not taken are not taken into consideration. These limitations should be further studied.

Originality/value

To the knowledge, this study is the first one reporting the identification of sleeping beauty and princes in educational technology field. Furthermore, the authors devise an informational method to determine sleeping publications, sleeping beauty, and princes. A systematic analysis of five well-known journals in the field of educational technology field confirms the existence of “sleeping beauties.” It is reported that improvements to a journal’s IF are positively correlated to increased numbers of sleeping beauties being awakened. To reduce the number of such articles, or to reduce the overall sleeping duration, journal editors should not only seek to raise the journal’s IF, but also strategically select keywords for maximum visibility, and promote articles to high H-index authors.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2015

Ramesh Pandita and Shivendra Singh

The purpose of this study is to examine the research growth in the field of library and information science (LIS) at a global level for the period 2004-2013. The key areas…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the research growth in the field of library and information science (LIS) at a global level for the period 2004-2013. The key areas analyzed in the study include research growth in LIS at a continental level, world’s ten leading LIS research countries, citation analysis Hirsch Index (h-index), etc.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is supported with empirical findings, for which data were retrieved from the SCImago Journal and Country Ranking, based on SCOPUS data source. The study is not exhaustive in nature, as it covers only those articles published in LIS journals indexed with this particular data source. The study simply reflects a trend and not the exhaustive figures.

Findings

A total of 75,887 research articles were retrieved on the date of data retrieval and put to analysis. The USA is emerging as a leading LIS research country with 29,349 articles, constituting 38.54 per cent of the total global LIS research output, followed by the UK and China. Spain is the fastest-growing LIS research country in the world, with an average annual research growth of 28.70 per cent, which is closely followed by Australia and China. The average annual corresponding research growth of LIS publications at the global level remained 10.46 per cent. Out of 194 nation countries, 162 (82.50 per cent) have contributed to the LIS research during the period. North America, Europe and Asia are the three leading LIS research continents.

Originality/value

The scope of the present study is global in nature and lasts for the period 2004-2013.

Details

Library Review, vol. 64 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2010

Monica A.M. Ridder, Maartje A. Heuvelmans, Tommy L.S. Visscher, Jacob C. Seidell and Carry M. Renders

The purpose of this paper is to investigate perceptions of second grade lower vocational students concerning benefits, barriers and strategies of healthy eating and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate perceptions of second grade lower vocational students concerning benefits, barriers and strategies of healthy eating and physical activity.

Design/methodology/approach

Focus group discussions are conducted with 37 adolescents, from three schools in The Netherlands. A semi‐structured questioning‐scheme is used. Recorded data are transcribed, analysed using Atlas.ti and arranged in the EnRG‐framework.

Findings

Adolescents find health and a healthy weight important and like having a choice when it comes to health behaviour. The choices they make, however, are often unhealthy, especially when related to food. The risk perception of these adolescents is low; as long as they feel healthy, they feel no need to change their behaviour. Parents are held responsible for providing opportunities for healthy behaviour. At the same time, parental influence lessens and adolescents start to develop unhealthy habits, usually under the influence of a peer group. Adolescents accept the interference of school, meaning that there are good opportunities for school‐based interventions.

Research limitations/implications

The number (37) of respondents may not be representative for the different personalities of peer‐students.

Practical implications

Adolescents need to take on greater responsibility for their own health behaviour, especially in the school setting where they are more autonomous than at home. More information is needed about the perceptions of parents and school staff regarding stimulating healthy dietary and physical behaviour to develop, implement and preserve integral school health interventions successfully.

Originality/value

The paper provides information on adolescents' perceptions on their responsibility for their health behaviour, which is needed to develop school‐based health intervention consistent with their needs.

Details

Health Education, vol. 110 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2018

Ajantha Velayutham and Asheq Razaur Rahman

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate whether an individual’s knowledge, skills and capabilities (human capital) are reflected in their compensation.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate whether an individual’s knowledge, skills and capabilities (human capital) are reflected in their compensation.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are drawn from university academics in the Province of Ontario, Canada, earning more than CAD$100,000 per annum. Data on academics human capital are drawn from Research Gate. The authors construct a regression analysis to examine the relationship between human capital and salary.

Findings

The analyses performed indicates a positive association between academic human capital and academic salaries.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited in that it measures an academic’s human capital solely through their research outputs as opposed to also considering their teaching outputs. Continuing research needs to be conducted in different country contexts and using negative proxies of human capital.

Practical implications

This study will create awareness about the value of human capital and its contribution towards improving organisational structural capital.

Social implications

The study contributes to the literature on human capital in accounting and business by focussing on the economic relevance of individual level human capital.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the literature on human capital in accounting and business by focussing on the economic relevance of individual level human capital. It will help create awareness of the importance of valuing human capital at the individual level.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Cameron Stewart Barnes

The purpose of this paper is to show how bibliometrics would benefit from a stronger programme of construct validity.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how bibliometrics would benefit from a stronger programme of construct validity.

Design/methodology/approach

The value of the construct validity concept is demonstrated by applying this approach to the evaluation of the h-index, a widely used metric.

Findings

The paper demonstrates that the h-index comprehensively fails any test of construct validity. In simple terms, the metric does not measure what it purports to measure. This conclusion suggests that the current popularity of the h-index as a topic for bibliometric research represents wasted effort, which might have been avoided if researchers had adopted the approach suggested in this paper.

Research limitations/implications

This study is based on the analysis of a single bibliometric concept.

Practical implications

The conclusion that the h-index fails any test in terms of construct validity implies that the widespread use of this metric within the higher education sector as a management tool represents poor practice, and almost certainly results in the misallocation of resources.

Social implications

This paper suggests that the current enthusiasm for the h-index within the higher education sector is misplaced. The implication is that universities, grant funding bodies and faculty administrators should abandon the use of the h-index as a management tool. Such a change would have a significant effect on current hiring, promotion and tenure practices within the sector, as well as current attitudes towards the measurement of academic performance.

Originality/value

The originality of the paper lies in the systematic application of the concept of construct validity to bibliometric enquiry.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 72 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2021

Fayaz Ahmad Loan, Nahida Nasreen and Bisma Bashir

The study's main purpose is to scrutinize Google Scholar profiles and find the answer to the question, “Do authors play fair or manipulate Google Scholar Bibliometric…

Abstract

Purpose

The study's main purpose is to scrutinize Google Scholar profiles and find the answer to the question, “Do authors play fair or manipulate Google Scholar Bibliometric Indicators like h-index and i10-index?”

Design/methodology/approach

The authors scrutinized the Google Scholar profiles of the top 50 library and science researchers claiming authorship of 21,022 publications. The bibliographic information of all the 21,022 publications like authorship and subject details were verified to identify accuracy, discrepancies and manipulation in their authorship claims. The actual and fabricated entries of all the authors along with their citations were recorded in the Microsoft Office Excel 2007 for further analyses and interpretation using simple arithmetic calculations.

Findings

The results show that the h-index of authors obtained from the Google Scholar should not be approved at its face value as the variations exist in the publication count and citations, which ultimately affect their h-index and i10 index. The results reveal that the majority of the authors have variations in publication count (58%), citations (58%), h-index (42%) and i10-index (54%). The magnitude of variation in the number of publications, citations, h-index and i10-index is very high, especially for the top-ranked authors.

Research limitations/implications

The scope of the study is strictly restricted to the faculty members of library and information science and cannot be generalized across disciplines. Further, the scope of the study is limited to Google Scholar and caution needs to be taken to extend results to other databases like Web of Science and Scopus.

Practical implications

The study has practical implications for authors, publishers, and academic institutions. Authors must stop the unethical research practices; publishers must adopt techniques to overcome the problem and academic institutions need to take precautions before hiring, recruiting, promoting and allocating resources to the candidates on the face value of the Google Scholar h-index. Besides, Google needs to work on the weak areas of Google Scholar to improve its efficacy.

Originality/value

The study brings to light the new ways of manipulating bibliometric indicators like h-index, and i10-index provided by Google Scholar using false authorship claims.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2013

Shashank Rao, Deepak Iyengar and Thomas J. Goldsby

Scholarly interest in carrying out impactful research continues to remain high. Yet, given that citations of scholarly work can never decrease with time, traditional…

Abstract

Purpose

Scholarly interest in carrying out impactful research continues to remain high. Yet, given that citations of scholarly work can never decrease with time, traditional measures of research impact (such as raw counts of citations) unwittingly discriminate against early career researchers and also make it hard to identify future high impact scholars. In the current study, the paper compares several commonly used measures of research impact to identify one that best normalizes for the effect of career stage. The measure thus applies equally across most career stages, providing a usable impact benchmark for logistics scholars irrespective of seniority level. The paper also aims to present benchmarks on that metric to help logistics scholars identify their research impact vis-à-vis their peers.

Design/methodology/approach

Bibliometric data on the research of 702 logistics scholars were collected and analyzed by dividing the scholars into different cohorts based on seniority. Comparisons of different citation metrics were then made.

Findings

The h-rate provides the most appropriate basis for comparing research impact across logistics scholars of various career stages. Benchmark h-rates are provided for scholars to identify their research impact.

Originality/value

The authors are unaware of any other work in the logistics field that measures the research impact of logistics scholars in this manner.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 43 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Hans Dam Christensen

By using the UNISIST models this paper argues for the necessity of domain analysis in order to qualify scientific information seeking. The models allow better…

Abstract

Purpose

By using the UNISIST models this paper argues for the necessity of domain analysis in order to qualify scientific information seeking. The models allow better understanding of communication processes in a scientific domain and they embrace the point that domains are always both unstable over time, and changeable, according to the specific perspective. This understanding is even more important today as numerous digitally generated information tools as well as collaborative and interdisciplinary research are blurring the domain borders. Nevertheless, researchers navigate “intuitively” in “their” specific domains, and UNISIST helps understanding this navigation. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The UNISIST models are tentatively applied to the domain of art history at three stages, respectively two modern, partially overlapping domains, as well as an outline of an art historical domain anno c1820. The juxtapositions are discussed against the backdrop of, among others, poststructuralist concepts such as “power” and “anti-essentialism”

Findings

The juxtapositions affirm the point already surfacing in the different versions of the UNISIST model, that is, structures of communication change over time as well as according to the agents that are charting them. As such, power in a Foucauldian sense is unavoidable in outlining a domain.

Originality/value

The UNISIST models are applied to the domain of art history and the article discusses the instability of a scientific domain as well as, at the same time, the significance of framing a domain; an implication which is often neglected in scientific information seeking.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 70 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Xingchen Li, Qiang Wu and Nan Zhang

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the extent to which researchers display citation information and examine whether there are researcher differences in citation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the extent to which researchers display citation information and examine whether there are researcher differences in citation personal display at the level of university, country, and academic rank.

Design/methodology/approach

Physicists from 11 well-known universities in USA, Britain, and China were chosen as the subjects of the study. It was manually identified if physicists had mentioned citation counts, citation-based indices, or a link to Google Scholar Citations on the personal websites. A χ2 test is constructed to test researcher differences in citation personal display.

Findings

Results showed that the overall proportion of citation personal display is not high (14.8 percent), with 129 of 870 physicists displaying citation. Moreover, physicists from different well-known universities indeed had a significant difference in citation personal display. Moreover, at the national level, it was noticed that physicists in well-known Chinese universities had the highest level of citation personal display, followed by Britain and the USA. Furthermore, this study also found that researchers who had the academic rank of professor had the highest citation personal display. In addition, the differences in h-index personal display by university, country, or academic rank were analyzed, and the results showed that they were not statistically significant.

Originality/value

This is the first study to investigate how widely researchers provide citation-based information on personal websites.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 73 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Evaluating Scholarship and Research Impact
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-390-2

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