Search results

1 – 8 of 8
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 August 2021

Farida Aryani, Hillman Wirawan, Abdul Saman, Sulaiman Samad and Muhammad Jufri

This study aims at investigating the indirect effect of soft skills on career engagement through the role of psychological capital (PsyCap) in different age groups. The…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims at investigating the indirect effect of soft skills on career engagement through the role of psychological capital (PsyCap) in different age groups. The social cognitive theory (SCT) and job demands-resource model (JD-R) were employed to explain the effect of perceived skill mastery on PsyCap and career engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from 707 high school students, 150 university students and 165 employees using a three-wave data collection technique. This study measured soft skills, PsyCap and career engagement at different age groups (i.e. high school students, university students and employees). The data were analysed using a moderated-mediation technique.

Findings

The results showed that soft skills positively influenced PsyCap and eventually increased career engagement in all age groups. However, the effect was stronger for students (both in high school and university) than employees in the workplaces. Unlike most students, employees related soft skills to performance. Regardless of the effect on performance, students would be more likely than employees to perceive soft skill mastery as a source of efficacy.

Research limitations/implications

First, the education system should direct more attention to developing students' non-cognitive skills. Second, people should understand that their career advancement continues in the workplace context. Organizations can foster employees' soft skills by providing more opportunities to develop new skills.

Originality/value

This study sheds light on the importance of soft skills beyond academic and workplace performance. This study is among the few empirical investigations that reveal career engagement factors across different career development stages.

Details

Education + Training, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 January 2018

Muhammad Jufri and Hillman Wirawan

The purpose of this paper is to develop entrepreneurship games for early childhood education (ECE) and to develop a module using a number of systematic approaches.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop entrepreneurship games for early childhood education (ECE) and to develop a module using a number of systematic approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

There were two studies conducted. Study 1 focused on developing guidelines for traditional games. The games were collected and selected based on their entrepreneurial characteristics. In study 2, the authors selected eight relevant traditional games and then examined their effectiveness at internalizing the spirit of entrepreneurship. For the assessment, the authors trained 40 expert raters from the fields of psychology, ECE, and entrepreneurship studies.

Findings

The results showed that two groups of raters agreed (k=0.64) that the games were effective for internalizing the spirit of entrepreneurship in ECE. In the second part of the study, the authors intended to develop a set of multimedia digital instructions and guidelines for users (e.g. teachers and instructors) as the traditional games provided no written instructions. This study produced the multimedia digital instructions and constructed a set of assessment tools for the teachers to test the effectiveness of the games.

Research limitations/implications

This study focused on developing traditional games into a structured guideline for teachers. However, further investigation is still necessary to gather evidence regarding the validity of the game manual. Future study should focus on testing the effect of the games on ECE as well as students’ entrepreneurial traits.

Originality/value

This study created a new approach by considering local values in developing an entrepreneurship intervention.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 60 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 June 2019

Muhammad Tamar, Hillman Wirawan and Elvita Bellani

This study aims to investigate the role of Buginese cultural value system (BCVS), motivational values type (MVT) and entrepreneurial traits (ET) on business performance…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the role of Buginese cultural value system (BCVS), motivational values type (MVT) and entrepreneurial traits (ET) on business performance (BP). The study investigated the role of each variable in predicting BP among Buginese entrepreneurs.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted in South Sulawesi, in small and medium scale enterprises with a focus on Buginese entrepreneurs. Random sampling technique was used along with some inclusion criteria. Based on those criteria, the questionnaires were administered to 300 participants with 70 per cent valid responses (180 males, 30 females). The study used well-constructed measures (i.e. BCVS, MVT, ET and BP) by following a guideline of adapting and developing instruments. The data were analyzed using structural equation model technique to examine the proposed theoretical model.

Findings

The results showed that the hypothesized model fitted the empirical data. The MVT and ET-mediated the effect of BCVS on BP or BCVS indirectly influenced BP. In brief, this research successfully showed that local cultural value system (BCVS) had a significant effect on the performance of Buginese entrepreneurs through the mediating role of MTV and ET, which means that local cultural value functions as a predictor of the performance of Buginese entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

A number of previous studies have investigated the significant role of local culture in predicting business and entrepreneurship performance. This study focused on local values and considering some advanced theories in both entrepreneurship and psychology. As a result, this study provided a new perspective in understanding local culture as an antecedent to entrepreneurship performance.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 October 2020

Muhammad Tamar, Hillman Wirawan, Triani Arfah and Retno Pratiwi Sutopo Putri

This study aims to investigate the effect of prosocial values on pro-environmental behaviours via attitudes in which environmental knowledge and proself values moderate…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the effect of prosocial values on pro-environmental behaviours via attitudes in which environmental knowledge and proself values moderate the relationship. This study also examines the application of the Theory of Planned Behaviour and Cognitive Dissonance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed a quantitative method to examine potential positive or negative moderating effects of environmental knowledge and proself values on environmental attitudes and behaviour. Participants were undergraduate students recruited from a state university in the eastern part of Indonesia. The online survey link was randomly sent to 500 students in 14 different Faculties with a response rate of 57% (285) participants (80% female). Data were analysed using a moderated-mediation regression technique.

Findings

The results suggested that only biospheric value positively affected pro-environmental behaviours. Environmental knowledge negatively moderated the relationship between prosocial values and environmental attitudes. Similarly, high egoistic value potentially reduced the effect of environmental attitude on pro-environmental behaviours. Environmental knowledge could impede the positive impacts of prosocial values while egoistic value negates the effect of attitude on pro-environmental attitude.

Research limitations/implications

Although the findings supported most hypotheses, this study did not control the effect of some demographic variables such as education and social-economic status. Participants tended to share some similar characteristics, which potentially influenced the results.

Originality/value

This study challenged some common antecedents of pro-environmental behaviours and offered some alternative explanations. This study has offered a new insight in understanding unique interactions among values, knowledge and attitude.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 January 2018

Hillman Wirawan, Muhammad Jufri and Andi Anto Patak

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of spiritual group training on improving the spiritual well-being (SWB) among adolescences. The SWB is one of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of spiritual group training on improving the spiritual well-being (SWB) among adolescences. The SWB is one of the factors that determines adolescences’ positive behavior. A number of previous studies have supported that spirituality and juvenile delinquency were negatively correlated. The level of SWB is mostly influenced by the peers’ group interaction and the role of others in the environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors developed a Spiritual Group Training by utilizing a number of relevant literature. The authors constructed the training using the meaning of life, values of life, life goals, life connections, and relation to God. In order to yield empirical evidence, the authors performed a pre- and post-test experimental design. The study recruited 26 randomly selected students from five high schools. The authors adapted a 13-item SWB scale to measure the participants’ SWB.

Findings

The results showed that Spiritual Group Training significantly improved participants’ SWB (t=9.71, p<0.001). The results confirmed the study hypothesis that spiritual group training enhanced adolescences’ SWB.

Research limitations/implications

Designing a proper intervention and evaluation was a challenging task for the authors. In this study, the authors evaluated the training by utilizing a simple pre- and post-test design. Future investigations should employ a different evaluation design.

Originality/value

Most studies support the notion that spirituality is negatively correlated with adolescence’s negative behavior. However, only a few, if any, investigations have focused on developing certain training focusing on SWB. This study contributed an important idea on the use of SWB to develop adolescence SWB.

Details

International Journal for Lesson and Learning Studies, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-8253

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 September 2020

Hillman Wirawan, Muhammad Jufri and Abdul Saman

This study aims to investigate the effect of authentic leadership and psychological capital (PsyCap) on work engagement via job satisfaction by employing the job…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the effect of authentic leadership and psychological capital (PsyCap) on work engagement via job satisfaction by employing the job demands-resources (JD-R) model.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were 307 (52% male and 48% female) employees randomly recruited from a state-owned company in the eastern part of Indonesia. Most participants had completed an undergraduate degree with a mean age of 27.55 (SD = 7.89). The study employed a three-wave data collection technique to rule out any common method biases.

Findings

The results suggested that the theoretical model and empirical data showed a good fit (CMIN/DF = 2.19 and RMSEA = 0.06), indicating an indirect effect of authentic leadership and PsyCap on work engagement via job satisfaction. The effect of authentic leadership on work engagement was fully mediated by job satisfaction. In contrast, job satisfaction only partially mediated the relationship between PsyCap and work engagement.

Research limitations/implications

First, this study did not explore any further consequences of gender equality. Second, although the data have been compared with some existing studies, this study did not collect cross-cultural data from different countries. Lastly, the data were collected from a state-owned enterprise, which may limit generalisation to other organisations.

Originality/value

This study offered a new perspective by examining the implications of the JD-R model in the eastern part of Indonesia, where organisation culture is predominantly influenced by Buginese values. Furthermore, the inclusion of job satisfaction into the model added new information regarding the importance of mediating variables in explaining the indirect effect of job and personal resources.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 41 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 July 2019

Hillman Wirawan, Muhammad Tamar and Elvita Bellani

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of emotional intelligence (EI) and achievement motivation (AM) on elementary school principals’ leadership styles…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of emotional intelligence (EI) and achievement motivation (AM) on elementary school principals’ leadership styles. This study investigates the contribution of EI and AM on the two major leadership categories: the task-oriented and relationship-oriented leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a quantitative study with the implementation of correlation and hierarchical regression analysis. The surveys (i.e. EI scale, AM scale, leadership style questionnaire) were sent randomly to 280 elementary school principals in South Sulawesi, Indonesia, and 90 of them completed the survey (mostly male=77.78 percent).

Findings

Principals’ EI significantly predicted both task-oriented and relationship-oriented leadership. In contrast, the principals’ AM yielded non-significant results in predicting both task-oriented and relationship-oriented leadership style. The results also suggested that the effect of EI on two major leadership styles (i.e. task- and relationship-orientation) outperformed the leader’s AM.

Research limitations/implications

This study did not consider the principals’ performance in the analysis. Future studies should also address this issue by considering leadership performance as well as different culture and context. On the other hand, the authors developed new measures rather than using preexisting measures. Although the measures have been constructed according to the scale construction principles and reached an acceptable standard, future research should advance the psychometric property of the scales.

Originality/value

This study discusses the effect of EI and AM on task- and relationship-orientation leadership. In addition, this study has also brought a new insight into understanding leadership styles in collective culture such as Indonesia.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 March 2016

Hillman Wirawan and Muhammad Thahir Bandu

The purpose of this paper is to consider the implication of self-efficacy training for international students (SETIS). International students faced various transitional…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the implication of self-efficacy training for international students (SETIS). International students faced various transitional challenges which also potentially attenuate their academic performance. Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) is sufficient in explaining this phenomenon as well as suggesting self-efficacy enhancement strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a speculative viewpoint on the implications of SETIS. The author reviewed relevant literature and systematically constructing the SETIS based on the SCT. The SCT was used to design an appropriate training to help international students cope with transitional challenges which significantly attenuate their academic performance.

Findings

The SCT and self-efficacy theory were relevant in designing the training for international students. There are four key elements of the SETIS: goal-setting; effort explanation; modeling; and sharing and evaluation. The implementation of SETIS follows the common rule in conducting effective training including need assessment and post-training evaluation. Information from academic performance record, English as Second Language test score, General Self-efficacy Scale, Students’ Adaptation to College Questionnaire, and Focus Group Discussion is also necessary to justify the need for SETIS.

Research limitations/implications

Despite theoretical evidence of the SETIS, further research is necessary to test the effectiveness of this training. Future study in this specific area should focus on examining the effectiveness of the training.

Originality/value

This paper addressed important issues in international education. A systematic effort in providing robust and theoretical-based training for international students is necessary. By considering the importance of self-efficacy and academic performance, this paper had begun an initial effort in designing training for international students who are struggling for a transitional challenge. Additionally, this paper provides a practical guideline in implementing SETIS.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

Keywords

1 – 8 of 8