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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Hilary Davies

A method for assessing the environmental performance of Hong Kong’s buildings has been developed, known as the Hong Kong Building Environmental Assessment Method or…

1337

Abstract

A method for assessing the environmental performance of Hong Kong’s buildings has been developed, known as the Hong Kong Building Environmental Assessment Method or HK‐BEAM. The assessment is a type of expert‐based survey, either of the design, in the case of proposed buildings, or an evaluation of building performance for newly built or existing buildings. The assessment essentially provides a benchmark of environmental performance against a series of qualitative and quantitative measures that earn “credits”. Buildings can be rated as “excellent”, “very good”, “good” or “fair”. The assessment covers global, local and indoor issues. The original assessment has been in use since 1996 and allowed appraisal of new and existing air‐conditioned offices. A new version has been recently produced for residential buildings. The latest version has addressed some of the criticisms of the earlier versions and covers a wider range of issues, taking a life‐cycle approach. Reviews the latest new residential version, making comparisons with the earlier new offices scheme.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2001

Hilary A. Davies and Eric K.S. Chan

Hong Kong has experienced an average annual growth in final energy consumption of 4.7 per cent over the last ten years. An initiative being undertaken by a small number of…

1529

Abstract

Hong Kong has experienced an average annual growth in final energy consumption of 4.7 per cent over the last ten years. An initiative being undertaken by a small number of government and commercial organisations is to limit their own consumption of electricity through performance contracting. Performance contracting is essentially a partnering process, where a client organisation partners with an energy management firm to identify and achieve energy savings for the client organisation. The research undertaken for this project has identified a number of factors that are considered to affect the success of performance contracting in Hong Kong. In a survey of practitioners, who have experience of performance contracting, some of the key benefits of this approach identified include the fact that there are substantial energy cost savings to be made. These savings are guaranteed by the partnering energy saving company and there are overall improved operational and plant efficiency gains. Key requirements for the success of such schemes include the setting‐up of an agreed energy baseline against which to measure results and human factors such as commitment to the enterprise at all levels of the organisation and trust between the co‐operating organisations. The paper expands the discussion on the benefits, obstacles and necessary ingredients for performance contracting that are likely to be applicable not just to Hong Kong but to the successful implementation of any such scheme.

Details

Facilities, vol. 19 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/02637479810202883. When citing…

2339

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/02637479810202883. When citing the article, please cite: Hilary Davies, Megan Walters, (1998), “Do all crises have to become disasters? Risk and risk mitigation”, Property Management, Vol. 16 Iss: 1, pp. 5 - 9.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

Hilary Davies

Summarizes the currently available strategies for success incarrying out improvements in the state of housing estates. Discusses thesymptoms of the degeneration and…

Abstract

Summarizes the currently available strategies for success in carrying out improvements in the state of housing estates. Discusses the symptoms of the degeneration and outlines the actual problem as estate design, poverty, bad estate management and fuel poverty. Suggests solutions based on improved estate design and estate management, and affordable heating. Declares that the only method of measuring the success of these solutions is in terms of alleviating the symptoms of social breakdown.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Hilary Davies

Reiterates the standard for fitness of human habitation set by the1989 revision of the 1985 Housing Act, section 604, and the majorchanges brought about by the revision…

Abstract

Reiterates the standard for fitness of human habitation set by the 1989 revision of the 1985 Housing Act, section 604, and the major changes brought about by the revision, (including hot and cold water supply to both sink basin and bath or shower, and ventilation standards). Suggests changes in the standard have caused a rise in the number of technically ′unfit′ properties from 5.6 per cent to up to 15 per cent of the UK′s housing stock. Concludes by questioning the need for and use of housing standards, suggesting that the market might more effectively dictate standards in practice, excepting the poorest sectors of the community, where standards should be both set and rigourously enforced.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Hilary Davies

Discusses the process of overcladding, assessing economic andsocial factors, and the various physical problems it can remedy.Explores the desirable features of…

Abstract

Discusses the process of overcladding, assessing economic and social factors, and the various physical problems it can remedy. Explores the desirable features of overcladding, highlighting water resistance, K value, fire resistance, high vapour permeability, dimensional stability, impact resistance, adjustability, low weight, ease of cleaning and maintenance, experienced installers and good appearance. Outlines the various factors for success, and stresses the necessity of creating a breathing fabric to alleviate condensation problems.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Nor Rima Muhamad Ariff and Hilary Davies

Homeownership is considered both economically and socially beneficial for homeowners. However, in the collective living arrangement, reaching a consensus with regard to…

2435

Abstract

Purpose

Homeownership is considered both economically and socially beneficial for homeowners. However, in the collective living arrangement, reaching a consensus with regard to the residential environment is difficult. The purpose of this paper is to identify factors that can reduce the conflict among the stakeholders in multi‐owner low‐cost housing in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

This study tested three hypotheses examining whether the demographic and socio‐economic characteristics of owner‐occupants and occupancy rates affect owner‐occupants' satisfaction with stakeholders' relationships. Data were collected through questionnaires from owner‐occupants of multi‐owner low‐cost settlements in Selangor state. Data on housing characteristics were collected from chairpersons of the respective owners' organisations. The data were treated as parametric, and analysis of variance was conducted.

Findings

Four factors – number of children in the family, duration of residency, participation in social activities and participation in meetings – were found to affect owners‐occupants' satisfaction with the stakeholders' relationships. The significant effect of occupancy rates was also indicated.

Practical implications

The Management Corporations (MCs) should encourage social relationships among residents. To avoid conflict, the costs and benefits of participation must be balanced. Policy makers should take two key aspects seriously: owner‐managed strategy practices by the MCs and high rates of tenant‐residents. A mechanism should be identified for assisting the MCs in housing management and for protecting the benefits of homeownership for owner‐occupants.

Originality/value

Past studies on low‐income household settlements examined public housing or low‐income homeowners of single detached dwellings. This study adds to the existing body of knowledge by examining low‐income homeowners in multi‐owner low‐cost settlements.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Hilary Davies

A popular façade treatment for buildings in Hong Kong is tile cladding. It is used for the majority of low and high‐rise residential buildings and the less expensive…

1093

Abstract

A popular façade treatment for buildings in Hong Kong is tile cladding. It is used for the majority of low and high‐rise residential buildings and the less expensive office developments in lower grade business districts. Mosaic and ceramic tiles are generally durable, versatile, waterproof and need little maintenance. However, tile defects such as dislodgement and water penetration can affect buildings that are only a few years old. The paper examines the typical causes of tiling defects and the range of repair methods that are being adopted in Hong Kong.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Hilary Davies and Christopher Stevens

Reports on a risk assessment survey, piloted in five London schools,which aimed to assess the schools′ susceptibility to vandalism, and toestablish which elements had the…

1370

Abstract

Reports on a risk assessment survey, piloted in five London schools, which aimed to assess the schools′ susceptibility to vandalism, and to establish which elements had the greatest effect on such vandalism. Findings show that most schools suffer vandalism of external areas, the level of which depends on boundary definition and maintenance, the number of entrances, whether sites are patrolled, and a building′s geometry. Suggests that objective risk assessment for schools is possible, and that headteachers can use such assessment to protect their schools more cost‐effectively.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1994

Hilary Davies and Brenda Jones

Individual schools may now elect to operate their own budget for alltheir basic running costs (including staffing, books, stationery,equipment, building maintenance…

300

Abstract

Individual schools may now elect to operate their own budget for all their basic running costs (including staffing, books, stationery, equipment, building maintenance, cleaning, grounds maintenance, school meals and fuel). The problem of maintenance being given low priority has been raised.

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 126