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Article

Alison Felce

Traditionally, apprenticeships have been the domain of further education and skills training providers, predominately at pre-higher education levels where management…

Abstract

Purpose

Traditionally, apprenticeships have been the domain of further education and skills training providers, predominately at pre-higher education levels where management, organisation, inspection and funding have little in common with those familiar to higher education. Higher level and degree apprenticeships have brought together different cultures and methods of designing, delivering and assessing knowledge, skills and behaviours, funding learners and learning providers, data reporting, quality management and its review or inspection. The purpose of this paper is to establish the primary concerns about managing quality in degree apprenticeships, the challenges the variances bring, how the challenges are being resolved and future work that may be required.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of a range of guidance and organisations involved in managing the quality of higher education in apprenticeships was undertaken. The primary focus is on the advice and guidance provided through the Quality Code and associated documentation, which are key to managing and assuring standards and quality in UK higher education. In addition, requirements and guidance provided through other bodies is considered along with the cross-sector groups charged with developing quality assurance processes for apprenticeships at all levels.

Findings

The paper shows a range of detailed guidance available to those entering the higher and degree apprenticeships arena and how the organisations involved in quality assurance of apprenticeships are working together to remove or mitigate concerns to ensure that quality is embedded and successfully managed.

Originality/value

Designing and delivering higher level and degree apprenticeships is a relatively new addition to UK higher education providers. There are long established practices to assure the quality and standards of UK higher education wherever and, however, it is delivered, in the UK, overseas and through online models. Apprenticeships across the UK have changed significantly over recent years, and new models, organisations and methods of working and funding have been introduced. This paper brings together key activity by the Quality Assurance Agency and other stakeholders to show how standards and quality can be managed and assured.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article

John Creedy and Patrick Francois

Examines, using a simple model, the choice of appropriatecontributions of taxes and fees used to finance higher education. Atwo‐period model is developed in which…

Abstract

Examines, using a simple model, the choice of appropriate contributions of taxes and fees used to finance higher education. A two‐period model is developed in which individuals in cohort invest in higher education in the first period, and the interdependences between educational choice and the tax system are considered. The implications of majority voting and the maximization of a social welfare function, allowing for a trade‐off between equity and efficiency, are examined in progressive and proportional tax systems.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article

Zamzulaila Zakaria, Susela Devi Selvaraj and Zarina Zakaria

To provide evidence on the establishment of the internal audit function in the higher education institutions in Malaysia and also to obtain the perceptions of the…

Abstract

Purpose

To provide evidence on the establishment of the internal audit function in the higher education institutions in Malaysia and also to obtain the perceptions of the management of the higher education institutions towards the role and scope of the internal audit.

Design/methodology/approach

Sample consisted of 17 public universities and 49 private universities in Malaysia and variables used by Gordon and Fischer were adopted for this study.

Findings

The findings revealed that a substantial number of private institutions of higher education do not have an internal audit function. The study also indicates that the management of both types of institutions have similar perceptions on the role of internal auditors and the important audit areas as there are no significant differences between public and private institutions of higher education.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of this study is that it only examines whether the scope of internal audit covers the areas mentioned by treasury circular or the IIA Guideline. It ignored the extent to which the higher education institutions comply with both guidelines. It is, therefore, suggested that future research could consider the degree of compliance to the above guidelines. The difference in the role of internal auditing between the education sector and other industries represents an interesting area for further research. Also, since this study only focuses on the perceptions of the management and the internal auditor themselves, the perception of other parties such as regulators and the audit committee on the role of internal audit in institutions of higher education will be an interesting area to explore for future research.

Practical implications

The failure to establish an internal audit function in the private universities calls for government intervention to ensure the existence of an internal audit function in the private sector higher education institutions.

Originality/value

The findings of this paper will be important in further refining the scope of the internal audit function in the higher educations institutions in Malaysia, especially to policymakers concerned with regulations governing the internal audit function.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 21 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

The Marketisation of English Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-856-9

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Book part

Cibele Yahn de Andrade

Enrollment in higher education in Brazil has been steadily growing and has reached 7 million recently. However, still only 21% of the population with age between 18 and 24…

Abstract

Enrollment in higher education in Brazil has been steadily growing and has reached 7 million recently. However, still only 21% of the population with age between 18 and 24 attend a higher education course. In this paper, we analyze how family income and race (defined in Brazil by self-declared skin color) affect the equity of access to higher education.

Details

Mitigating Inequality: Higher Education Research, Policy, and Practice in an Era of Massification and Stratification
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-291-7

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Article

Qiang Lianqing

Describes the programme of reconstructing higher education which is currently under way in China. Outlines the history of formal education in China from the beginning of…

Abstract

Describes the programme of reconstructing higher education which is currently under way in China. Outlines the history of formal education in China from the beginning of the twentieth century and explains the national system of administration of higher education. Sets out ten major aspects in which Chinese higher education has to be reformed in order to meet the demands of the twenty‐first century

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article

TOM GORE

Higher education demands considerable expenditure. In 1976–77 the recurrent expenditure alone in Great Britain was roughly £1 336 millions, which included maintenance…

Abstract

Higher education demands considerable expenditure. In 1976–77 the recurrent expenditure alone in Great Britain was roughly £1 336 millions, which included maintenance grants of £362 millions to students pursuing advanced courses in the institutions concerned with them. The expenditure represents about 18 per cent of all recurrent expenditure in 1976–77 by the Department of Education and Science, the Scottish Education Department and the Welsh Office. Capital expenditure on higher education in 1976–77 was around £154 millions. These large sums of expenditure are basically determined by the size of the eighteen year old age group and those in this group who qualify for higher education by acquiring the required ‘A’ levels and who wish to pursue it. The age participation rate (APR) is crucial to any analysis of future developments.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 11 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article

Bayu Rima Aditya, Ridi Ferdiana and Sri Suning Kusumawardani

This study aims to test a theoretical framework to identify and prioritize barriers in the implementation of digital transformation in higher education.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to test a theoretical framework to identify and prioritize barriers in the implementation of digital transformation in higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework was tested using the context of a particular nation: Indonesia. First, a survey questionnaire was conducted to identify the key barriers. Second, the contextual relationship between the key barriers was determined based on an expert’s input to find the importance level of barriers and the degree of difficulty to fix the barriers. Finally, a barrier priority matrix was developed to prioritize the barriers.

Findings

This study identified the key barriers in the implementation of digital transformation in higher education in Indonesia including eight contextual issues, one technical issue and two cultural issues with different levels of importance and difficulty. Based on the matrix constructed, this study also presented a list of the top 11 priorities of barriers.

Research limitations/implications

The results were based on a particular region context.

Practical implications

This study lays the foundation for the theoretical framework that is practically useful to perform the identification and prioritization of barriers. Besides, the result discussed in this study gives some direction for policymakers in designing sensible strategies to overcome the barriers.

Originality/value

The main contribution of this study is an empirical study that systematically identifies and prioritizes barriers to digital transformation in higher education.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

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Book part

Moses W. Ngware

This chapter provides a critical assessment of an article on higher education and economic development, by analyzing the ways the authors reflect on the importance of…

Abstract

This chapter provides a critical assessment of an article on higher education and economic development, by analyzing the ways the authors reflect on the importance of building technological capabilities. The need to demonstrate the use of evolutionary economics and innovation systems approach in demonstrating higher education contribution to economic growth motivated the article. The critique begins by examining the dominant theories and reflective pieces used by scholars to explain higher education’s contribution to economic development, and then situate the evolutionary economics and innovation systems approach used in the article in this discourse. This critical assessment also delves into how the article approaches the subject matter of higher education; and, the methods used to gather evidence for the case of higher education in South Africa. The chapter then condenses popular views on the role of higher education in economic development and assesses whether “building technological capabilities” is one such view or it is an emerging role. In conclusion, the chapter synthesizes the various sections in the article and isolates the key issues that underpin each of the sections and how each issue is manifested in the higher education sector. The conclusion unloads the overall construction of the article to succinctly knit the bigger argument advanced by the article and provide reasons for the viewpoints supported by this assessment.

Details

Annual Review of Comparative and International Education 2016
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-528-7

Keywords

Content available
Article

Yang Can and Angela Yung Chi Hou

The advance in higher education in Asian countries is of major interest because it reveals increasing global political and cultural influence in recent years. The review…

Abstract

Purpose

The advance in higher education in Asian countries is of major interest because it reveals increasing global political and cultural influence in recent years. The review explores the characteristics of publications from 2013–2018 concerned with the internationalisation of higher education in Asia. The study aims to analyse the current trajectory, including the size, growth trends, and regional networking of this domain, with a goal of identifying the influential journals, authors, and documents, as well exploring the thematic structure and topical issues and trends of this domain.

Design/methodology/approach

241 Scopus-indexed documents were selected and reviewed using a quantitative descriptive way. These documents were analysed by VOS viewer software.

Findings

The results show the most topical issues and trends concern about “Asian immigration and mobility”, “transnational education”, “international students and acculturation”, and “international branch campuses”. Seven main schools of thought were identified and are clearly explained herein, which provides a baseline for future research for new scholars.

Social implications

The present study suggests that trans-regional cooperation is the future of internationalisation in higher education. Asian scholars are recommended to increase cooperation and exchanges with each other, expand channels of contact, further understand and optimise their own advantages, achieve win-win cooperation and make Asia's voice heard in the world in higher education field.

Originality/value

This bibliometric review can predict the main trends in higher education internationalisation in the future and encourage implication of interdisciplinary research in higher education internationalisation.

Details

Higher Education Evaluation and Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-5789

Keywords

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