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1 – 10 of 153
Book part
Publication date: 28 June 2016

Soo-yong Byun and Suet-ling Pong

Using data from the 2000 Program for International Student Assessment, we examined determinants of children’s participation in highbrow cultural activities and its…

Abstract

Using data from the 2000 Program for International Student Assessment, we examined determinants of children’s participation in highbrow cultural activities and its relationship with academic achievement in Hong Kong. We found that family socioeconomic status (SES) and home possessions related to high-status culture were important determinants of children’s participation in highbrow cultural activities. Yet, we found no significant relationship between children’s participation in highbrow cultural activities and academic achievement when controlling for other variables. We highlighted several characteristics of Hong Kong society and its educational system, including the British colonial experience, extreme focus on test preparation, and extensive shadow education, all of which may combine to explain the role of cultural resources in this East Asian society.

Details

Family Environments, School Resources, and Educational Outcomes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-627-0

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Schooling and Social Capital in Diverse Cultures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-885-8

Abstract

Details

Schooling and Social Capital in Diverse Cultures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-885-8

Article
Publication date: 25 October 2022

Feyza Nur Ozkan and Sema Kurtulus

This study aims to identify the role of consumer characteristics in cultural consumption tendencies. Additionally, the study examines whether country differences and prior…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify the role of consumer characteristics in cultural consumption tendencies. Additionally, the study examines whether country differences and prior experience in the country affect consumers' cultural consumption tendencies.

Design/methodology/approach

The effects of cosmopolitanism, consumer ethnocentrism, individual innovativeness, and lifestyle on cultural consumption tendencies were tested. Moreover, we assess whether country type and prior experience are differentiating factors for cultural consumption tendencies. To this end, two countries – the USA and South Korea, representing Western and Eastern cultures, respectively – were selected to achieve comparable results in two different cultures. The research data were collected from 775 people using an online survey method and analyzed using path analysis and an independent samples t-test.

Findings

Consumer characteristics affect cultural consumption tendencies. These effects are culture-specific and cultural product-specific. Cosmopolitanism has a positive impact on cultural consumption tendencies, while consumer ethnocentrism has a negative impact. Individual innovativeness and lifestyle partially affected cultural consumption tendencies. Notably, these effects differ by country type. However, cultural consumption tendencies do not differ according to consumers' prior experience.

Practical implications

This study provides insightful information for e-retailers to be mindful of global consumer characteristics. Accordingly, cultural consumption patterns can be used as the basis for market segmentation. In addition, understanding global consumer characteristics and their cultural product- and culture-specific effects on consumption will help cultural industry players in their segmentation and targeting decisions.

Originality/value

Notwithstanding the rich body of literature on cultural consumption, this study provides consumer-level comparative empirical research from a marketing perspective. Essentially, the study is novel as it reveals the consumer characteristics that affect cultural consumption tendencies.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

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Abstract

Details

Family Environments, School Resources, and Educational Outcomes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-627-0

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 October 2021

Shuo Liu

This paper aims to provide an overview of the development periods of home-based learning in Hong Kong during the COVID-19 pandemic, then discusses the differences in how…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an overview of the development periods of home-based learning in Hong Kong during the COVID-19 pandemic, then discusses the differences in how the more affluent and well-educated middle-class parents and the economically and culturally disadvantaged working-class parents have dealt with the challenges of this new learning mode in their children’s education.

Design/methodology/approach

This research mainly adopted the qualitative research method, and used data from multiple sources, including online and offline participant observations, informal interviews and second-hand official reports.

Findings

The preliminary findings suggest that due to the closure of the formal schooling system, the impact of unequal family resources – such as tangible economic investment and intangible cultural and social support – on students’ academic performance has been exposed, thus reinforcing the pre-existing inequality between different social classes.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this paper are primarily based on preliminary observations and informal interviews, and it needs more systematic studies, both qualitative and quantitative, are needed to provide further empirical evidence to demonstrate the impacts of digital, housing and knowledge divide between the middle- and working-class families on students’ academic performance.

Originality/value

The paper presents new empirical data concerning the class mechanisms underlying home-based learning during the class suspension in Hong Kong. It shows that home-based learning in this challenging time has exposed the existing inequality in education.

Details

Social Transformations in Chinese Societies, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1871-2673

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Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2019

Andrés Artal-Tur, Noelia Sánchez-Casado and María Isabel Osorio-Caballero

Cultural tourism comprises several heterogeneous activities. According to tourists’ interest in culture and their level of involvement with the local population during the…

Abstract

Cultural tourism comprises several heterogeneous activities. According to tourists’ interest in culture and their level of involvement with the local population during the trip, segments of cultural tourism can be identified. Regarding their characteristics and the place of the visit, this chapter explores how cultural tourism can contribute to a country like Iran. Based on the literature, the discussion begins by describing tourists’ profile while highlighting some features related to their traveling behavior. In line with past studies on host–guest relations and the current stage of development of the country as an international destination, potential impacts of opening the country to international cultural tourists are analyzed.

Details

Experiencing Persian Heritage
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-813-8

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Book part
Publication date: 21 December 2010

Steven Kahl, Young-Kyu Kim and Damon J. Phillips

We explore how the long-run success of cultural products is affected by the identities of the product's originators and early adopters. Using U.S. jazz recordings from…

Abstract

We explore how the long-run success of cultural products is affected by the identities of the product's originators and early adopters. Using U.S. jazz recordings from 1920 to 1929, we found that songs were more likely to be later covered from 1944 to 2004 if they followed a pattern of having black originators and white early adopters. Moreover, we provide evidence that this pattern is independent of a song's commercial success, resources available to a song's originators, and group-level indicators such as size and experience. We conclude that late adopters (musicians after World War II (WWII)) were attracted to songs that followed a narrative of both “lowbrow” origins and early adoption by those considered “highbrow” with respect to jazz. The findings also support a new means for considering the role of identities as the building blocks of genres, in particular, and categories more generally.

Details

Categories in Markets: Origins and Evolution
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-594-6

Book part
Publication date: 23 November 2011

Mary Ann Glynn and Daniel S. Halgin

We explore the role of geographic communities in the construction of an organization's identity as narrated in the pages of Martha Stewart Living magazine, the flagship…

Abstract

We explore the role of geographic communities in the construction of an organization's identity as narrated in the pages of Martha Stewart Living magazine, the flagship product of the Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia organization. We content analyzed 253 columns published between 1990 and 2004. We found that communities figured prominently in the emergence and institutionalization of the organization's identity, with over 800 mentions of specific places, from Stewart's childhood home of Nutley, New Jersey, to storied Paris, France. We examined how Stewart's use of places compared with descriptions of these same places in the Lonely Planet Travel. Our evidence suggests that the invocation of community enabled the organization to legitimate its product offerings as well as claim and partition complex and sometimes contradictory identity elements that included both highbrow culture and Americana “rural apple-pie goodness.”

Details

Communities and Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-284-5

Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Casper Hvenegaard Rasmussen

From collection to connection has been a buzzword in the library world for more than a decade. This catchy phrase indicates that users are seen not only as borrowers, but…

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Abstract

Purpose

From collection to connection has been a buzzword in the library world for more than a decade. This catchy phrase indicates that users are seen not only as borrowers, but as active participants. The aim of this paper is to investigate and analyse three questions in relation to user participation in public libraries in a Nordic perspective. How can participation in public libraries be characterised? Why should libraries deal with user participation? What kinds of different user participation can be identified in public libraries?

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a selection of theoretical approaches and practical examples to obtain a varied understanding of user participation in public libraries. Research fields outside library and information science have developed a wide range of theoretical approaches on user participation. Examples from cultural policy, museum studies and participatory culture are selected to get a deeper understanding on participation in public libraries. The practical examples are chosen to illustrate the richness of different kinds of user participation in libraries.

Findings

There are six forms of active participation in libraries: volunteer programmes, interactive displays, workshops, co-creation, user-driven innovation and book clubs.

Originality/value

This paper is an overall synthesis of theoretical and practical aspects of user participation in public libraries. Furthermore, the paper challenges the deeply rooted assumption that participation in libraries takes place almost exclusively within digital contexts.

Details

New Library World, vol. 117 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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