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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2022

Iqbal Mehmood, Keith Macky and Mark Le Fevre

The purpose of this paper is to examine perceptions of organisational politics (POP) as a mediator of the relationship between high-involvement work practices (HIWPs) and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine perceptions of organisational politics (POP) as a mediator of the relationship between high-involvement work practices (HIWPs) and employee outcomes (trust in employer and employee engagement).

Design/methodology/approach

Using a longitudinal time-lagged quantitative survey design, data were collected in two waves (n = 1,554, time 1, and n = 970, time 2). Direct and indirect (mediation) effects were tested through structural equation modelling (SEM) in AMOS.

Findings

The results of SEM suggest that HIWPs are positively associated with trust in the employer and employee engagement and negatively associated with POP. The data supported a partial mediation model in which POP mediated the relationship between HIWPs and both trust in the employer and employee engagement levels.

Practical implications

HIWPs reduce employees’ perceptions of the degree to which their work environment is politicised, enhance employee engagement and develop a more trusting relationship between employee and employer.

Originality/value

Perceptions that workplace environments are characterised by political behaviours are ubiquitous and a large body of research has highlighted their detrimental effects on both employees and employers. This is the first study that has examined the potential of HIWPs in reducing such perceptions, which in turn, can foster employee engagement and enhance trust in the employer. Longitudinal studies of the effect HIWPs have on employee perceptions and attitudes are also still scarce.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2021

Gul Afshan, Muhammad Kashif, Firdous Khanum, Mansoor Ahmed Khuhro and Umair Akram

Based on the conservation of resources theory, this study aims to investigate high involvement work practices (HIWP) as an antecedent to burnout with a mediating role of…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on the conservation of resources theory, this study aims to investigate high involvement work practices (HIWP) as an antecedent to burnout with a mediating role of perceived work–family (WF) imbalance. Moreover, this study examines whether humble leadership moderates the relationship between HIWP and WF imbalance.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a time-lagged survey approach, data are collected from 200 employees working in the Indian services sector organizations.

Findings

The findings demonstrate that HIWP has a direct negative effect on burnout and an indirect effect via WF imbalance. Also, humble leadership moderates the relationship between HIWP and WF imbalance.

Originality/value

By studying the pessimistic view of HIWP in the Indian context, this study contributes to the scant studies available on its effect on burnout in collectivistic societies. Furthermore, humble leadership's moderating role in the relationship between HIWP and WF imbalance is unique to this study.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 40 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 March 2011

Mohamed Behery

The aim of the current study is to examine the impact of high involvement work practices (HIWPs) upon trust and commitment in a non‐Western cultural context, namely the UAE.

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the current study is to examine the impact of high involvement work practices (HIWPs) upon trust and commitment in a non‐Western cultural context, namely the UAE.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative, empirical data for the study were collected using self‐administered questionnaires with 600 participants from different service organizations in the UAE. Respondents were asked to provide their perceptions of a range of practices and their impact on trust and commitment.

Findings

The analyses support a model in which a collection of HIWPs positively influenced trust and commitment. In addition, work status and citizenship were used as control variables and played a partially significant role in explaining the effect of those practices on the outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

The findings imply that managers should realize that implementing high involvement policies, and benefiting from them, is not as simple as instituting a single practice. What is required is an organizational culture that cultivates HIWPs.

Originality/value

Since little is known about the process by which UAE organizations promote the HIWPs, this article is the first to examine these issues in a non‐Western setting. Consequently, it contributes to the literature by examining whether the empirical results found in Western environments can be extended to non‐Western contexts.

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 January 2022

Zhining Wang, Tao Cui, Shaohan Cai and Shuang Ren

Based on social information processing (SIP) theory, this study explores the cross-level effect of high-involvement work practices (HIWPs) on employee innovative behavior…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on social information processing (SIP) theory, this study explores the cross-level effect of high-involvement work practices (HIWPs) on employee innovative behavior by studying the mediating role of self-reflection/rumination and the moderating role of transactive memory system (TMS).

Design/methodology/approach

This study collects data from 452 employees and their direct supervisors in 94 work units, and tests a cross-level moderated mediation model using multilevel path analysis.

Findings

The results suggest that HIWPs significantly contribute to employee innovative behavior. Both self-reflection and self-rumination mediate the above relationship. TMS not only positively moderates the relationship between HIWPs and self-reflection, but also reinforces the linkage of HIWPs. →self-reflection→employee innovative behavior. Furthermore, TMS negatively moderates the relationship between HIWPs and self-rumination, and attenuates the mediating effect of self-rumination.

Practical implications

The study suggests that enterprises should invest more in promoting HIWPs and TMS in the workplace. Furthermore, managers should provide employees training programs to enhance their self-reflection, as well as lower self-rumination, in order to facilitate employee innovative behavior.

Originality/value

This research identifies self-reflection and self-rumination as key mediators that link HIWPs to employee innovative behavior and reveals the moderating role of TMS in the process.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 43 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 October 2010

PohLean Chuah, Wai Peng Wong, T. Ramayah and M. Jantan

This paper aims to examine the relationships among supplier management practices, organizational context and supplier performance. The contexts selected for supplier…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the relationships among supplier management practices, organizational context and supplier performance. The contexts selected for supplier management practices are economics transactional practices and high involvement work practices (HIWP); while power asymmetry and competition intensity are considered within the organizational context.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was conducted on a multinational semiconductor company. A two‐phase statistical analysis, which comprised phase one (reliability and factor analysis), and phase two (hierarchical multiple regression analysis), was used to analyze the data.

Findings

The study provides empirical evidence to support the conceptual and prescriptive statements in the literature regarding the impact of supplier management practices and the dynamics between organizational context and supplier management towards supplier performance. The results show that high involvement work practices (HIWP) mediate the impact of competition intensity on suppliers' quality performance and partially mediate the effect of competition intensity on suppliers' flexibility. The limitation of this study is that it does not use longitudinal data, which would be more useful to examine changes in variables that affect performance; nevertheless, as this study was conducted in‐house, it was able to control the extraneous factors.

Originality/value

The study provides important insights for managers to understand the disposition of the firm to better leverage organizational context by exploiting relationships with suppliers. The paper has extended organizational theory and marketing theory into a supply chain context. Moreover, it is among the first empirical work that specifically investigates the relationship between organizational context and supplier management practices; thus the paper fills an important gap in the supply chain literature.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2003

Frederick Guy

High involvement work practices (HIWPs) may empower employees to do their jobs better, and also empower them at the bargaining table. This paper considers whether…

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Abstract

High involvement work practices (HIWPs) may empower employees to do their jobs better, and also empower them at the bargaining table. This paper considers whether non‐universal adoption of productivity‐enhancing work practices may, at least in part, be explained by this dual nature of empowerment. It examines the case of a customer service programme in the Northern California division of Safeway stores, its affect on the outcome of a strike against Safeway, and the subsequent pattern of adoption (and non‐adoption) of similar programmes among Safeway's competitors. It concludes that the dual nature of empowerment can help explain the apparent paradox posed by empirical studies; that although HIWPs improve the performance of all sorts of organisations, most organisations do not adopt HIWPs.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Vathsala Wickramasinghe and Anuradha Gamage

This article explores the relationship between high‐involvement work practices and quality results, and the role of HR function in the implementation of quality and…

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Abstract

Purpose

This article explores the relationship between high‐involvement work practices and quality results, and the role of HR function in the implementation of quality and high‐involvement work practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Quality managers and HR managers from 34 manufacturing firms with ISO 9001 certification and competing for national/international quality awards responded. Correlation and regression were used for the data analysis.

Findings

Team work, communication, performance evaluation, empowerment, rewards and recognition, and skill development practices significantly positively correlate with quality results. Of these practices, performance evaluation has the greatest impact followed by communication, and rewards and recognition. In the implementation of quality and work practices, the role of the HR department can be identified as “steering”.

Originality/value

A majority of research studies on high‐involvement work practices has been confined to Western manufacturing contexts; and findings of these studies are not conclusive. It is expected that the findings of this exploratory study will be able to establish baseline data to stimulate further research in this area.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 December 2020

Urtzi Uribetxebarria, Mónica Gago, Maite Legarra and Unai Elorza

This paper examines the extent to which investment in human capital (HC) influences employee well-being, focusing on companies in the Basque Country in Northern Spain…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the extent to which investment in human capital (HC) influences employee well-being, focusing on companies in the Basque Country in Northern Spain. Specifically, it analyzes the effects of worker perceptions of high-involvement work system (HIWS) on job satisfaction (JS) and affective commitment (AC), directly and through the mediating role of trust in management. This trust mediating role was also explored by analyzing the isolated effects of high-involvement work processes (power, information, reward and knowledge [PIRK] enhancing practices) on JS and AC.

Design/methodology/approach

The structural equation modeling (SEM) approach was used on a sample of 2,199 employees from 425 organizations working in different industries. As the study was performed at the organizational level, aggregation was conducted first.

Findings

The findings revealed that trust partially mediated the relationship between HIWS and JS, although AC was directly predicted by the system. In contrast, a trust mediating role was confirmed in the relationship between all PIRK processes, JS and AC.

Originality/value

This study highlights the “hinge” role of trust in linking high-involvement work practices (HIWPs) as an approach to assess HC in organizations and well-being at work. It further conceptualizes HIWS via a PIRK model and operationalizes it through systemic and dimensional approach.

Article
Publication date: 7 January 2019

Hanna Salminen, Mikaela von Bonsdorff and Monika von Bonsdorff

Human resource management (HRM) scholars’ interest in older employees’ resilience has only recently started to emerge. Little is known about how resilience and perceived…

Abstract

Purpose

Human resource management (HRM) scholars’ interest in older employees’ resilience has only recently started to emerge. Little is known about how resilience and perceived HRM are linked to different retirement intentions. Drawing on the conservation of resources and social exchange theories, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the links between perceived HRM practices, resilience and retirement intentions. Additionally, the paper examines the possible mediating role of resilience in the relationship between perceived HRM practices and retirement intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

In 2016, a cross-sectional study was conducted among older (50+) nursing professionals working in a Finnish university hospital. Statistical methods, including mean comparisons and linear and logistic regression analyses, were used to analyze the data.

Findings

The results indicated that resilience partly mediated the relationship between perceived HRM practices and early retirement intentions, and fully mediated the association between perceived HRM practices and intentions to continue working after retirement age.

Originality/value

This study produces new knowledge regarding the links between resilience, perceived High involvement work practices and retirement intentions.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Marisa Kay Smith

The purpose of this paper is to examine the experience of call centre employees who have been involved in high-involvement innovation (HII) activities to understand what…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the experience of call centre employees who have been involved in high-involvement innovation (HII) activities to understand what frontline and managerial employees think of these involvement activities.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative case study approach is utilised, drawing on evidence from seven UK call centres. Various sources of data are examined, i.e. interviews, observation, call listening and documentary.

Findings

From the analysis of the testimonies, it is found that job design, the mechanisms and practices as well as other people’s perceptions of involvement influence the experience of frontline and managerial employees. The findings highlight that HII has the potential to intensify jobs (both frontline and managerial employees) when the quantity of ideas submitted becomes a component of the employee performance appraisal system.

Research limitations/implications

This research has shown that the heightened targets used in many of the cases have reduced the ability of employees to be involved in any innovation activities. What is not clear from the findings is that if performance measures can be used in a more participative way with employees so that they can have less time pressure allowing them to become more involved in innovation activities. Thus, an interesting direction for future research would be to consider the effects of performance measurement systems in the role they play in facilitating HII activities.

Practical implications

The findings show that HII has the potential to enrich frontline employees’ jobs, making them feel more valued and giving them some variety and challenge in their job. Therefore, practitioners should approach employee involvement in the innovation process as something potentially fruitful and not just wasted time away from the phones.

Originality/value

This research is important as it explores what effects these involvement initiatives have on the employees and managers involved in them. This is valuable since there is no real consensus across human resource management, labour process and critical management fields resulting in a limited conceptualisation of the relationship between management practices, employee experiences and the outcomes. This research makes a contribution through the elaboration of current theory to understand the complexities and subtleties that exist between the high involvement management practices and the experience of workers and their managers.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

1 – 10 of 31