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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2020

Emmanuel Imuetinyan Aghimien, Lerato Millicent Aghimien, Olutomilayo Olayemi Petinrin and Douglas Omoregie Aghimien

This paper aims to present the result of a scientometric analysis conducted using studies on high-performance computing in computational modelling. This was done with a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the result of a scientometric analysis conducted using studies on high-performance computing in computational modelling. This was done with a view to showcasing the need for high-performance computers (HPC) within the architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) industry in developing countries, particularly in Africa, where the use of HPC in developing computational models (CMs) for effective problem solving is still low.

Design/methodology/approach

An interpretivism philosophical stance was adopted for the study which informed a scientometric review of existing studies gathered from the Scopus database. Keywords such as high-performance computing, and computational modelling were used to extract papers from the database. Visualisation of Similarities viewer (VOSviewer) was used to prepare co-occurrence maps based on the bibliographic data gathered.

Findings

Findings revealed the scarcity of research emanating from Africa in this area of study. Furthermore, past studies had placed focus on high-performance computing in the development of computational modelling and theory, parallel computing and improved visualisation, large-scale application software, computer simulations and computational mathematical modelling. Future studies can also explore areas such as cloud computing, optimisation, high-level programming language, natural science computing, computer graphics equipment and Graphics Processing Units as they relate to the AEC industry.

Research limitations/implications

The study assessed a single database for the search of related studies.

Originality/value

The findings of this study serve as an excellent theoretical background for AEC researchers seeking to explore the use of HPC for CMs development in the quest for solving complex problems in the industry.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2012

Fei Luo, Hai Jin, Xiaofei Liao and Qin Zhang

Peer‐to‐peer (P2P) communities have the capability to construct a powerful virtual supercomputer by assembling idle internet cycles. The purpose of this paper is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Peer‐to‐peer (P2P) communities have the capability to construct a powerful virtual supercomputer by assembling idle internet cycles. The purpose of this paper is to present the scheduling issues in an unstructured P2P‐based high performance computing (HPC) system to achieve high performance for applications.

Design/methodology/approach

A new application model is proposed for the system, where applications are parallelized in the program level. To address high performance for these applications, the system resources are controlled in a semi‐centralized 3‐layer network, where volunteers form many autonomous unstructured P2P domains. Furthermore, based on such a resource management policy, a job scheduling strategy is adopted, which is collaborated by global and domain scheduling. The global scheduling is responsible for the balance among domains, while the domain scheduling resolve workpiles' execution in a domain.

Findings

Theoretical analysis and a benchmark experiment show that the scheduling provides scalable and enormous computing capability in the P2P‐based HPC system.

Originality/value

The paper shows that scheduling helps P2HP (an unstructured P2P‐based HPC system) provide scalable and enormous computing capability for HPC applications.

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Joseph Rubleske and Nicholas Berente

This paper aims at advancing a pragmatist perspective on entrepreneurial opportunities as an alternative to the traditional and predominant constructivist and objectivist…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims at advancing a pragmatist perspective on entrepreneurial opportunities as an alternative to the traditional and predominant constructivist and objectivist perspectives. To this end, this paper advances a pragmatist definition of an opportunity and draws from empirical evidence to propose a pragmatist model of opportunity conception and exploitation.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the entrepreneurial opportunity and pragmatism literatures yields a definition of an opportunity as a dynamic and unfolding experience which an entrepreneur conceives as a general market need to exploit it for financial or social gain. Drawing from this definition, and with the aim of developing a pragmatist model of an opportunity, a case study approach is applied to three radically innovative services conceived and developed by three high-performance computing (HPC) centers.

Findings

In each of the three cases, an entrepreneurial HPC center conceived a new, general market need (opportunity) and then acted to exploit it. Through its action, the HPC center learned something that enabled it to address barriers, develop an improvement or otherwise reconceive the opportunity. In turn, the HPC center learned more about and advanced the opportunity, and then acted again. After launching a new service based on the opportunity, the opportunity continued to evolve in response to the HPC center’s efforts and to market forces.

Research limitations/implications

The pragmatist perspective and model of an opportunity can serve as a foundation for future pragmatist research into entrepreneurship and innovation. To this end, future studies could extend the model by examining in greater detail the acting-learning-reconceiving cycle, by exploring how an opportunity evolves and is reconceived after market launch and/or by investigating opportunity conception and exploitation within other types of markets.

Practical implications

From a pragmatist perspective, an opportunity is not some discrete object to be discovered. It is emergent and dynamic, and to the extent that it is “created”, it is never complete or finalized. It is experienced by the entrepreneur, and it continues to evolve, even after it has been launched as a new good or service.

Originality/value

The paper proposes novel value by advancing a pragmatist perspective on entrepreneurial opportunities. Such a perspective is an alternative to the constructivist and objectivist perspectives that have framed research into opportunities. The paper also proposes novel value by drawing from case study findings to propose a pragmatist model of opportunity conception and exploitation.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Dimitris Kehagias, Michael Grivas, Basilis Mamalis and Grammati Pantziou

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the use of a non‐expensive dynamic computing resource, consisting of a Beowulf class cluster and a NoW, as an educational and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the use of a non‐expensive dynamic computing resource, consisting of a Beowulf class cluster and a NoW, as an educational and research infrastructure.

Design/methodology/approach

Clusters, built using commodity‐off‐the‐shelf (COTS) hardware components and free, or commonly used, software, provide an inexpensive computing resource to educational institutions. The Department of Informatics of TEI, Athens, has built a dynamic clustering system consisting of a Beowulf‐class cluster and a NoW called DYNER (DYNamic clustER). This paper evaluates the use of the DYNER system, as a platform for running the laboratory work of various courses (parallel computing, operating systems, distributed computing), as well as various parallel applications in the framework of research, which is in progress under on‐going research projects. Three distinct groups from the academic community of the TEI of Athens can benefit directly from the DYNER platform: the students of the Department of Informatics, the faculty members and researchers of the department, and researchers from other departments of the institution.

Findings

The results obtained were positive and satisfactory. The use of the dynamic cluster offers to the students new abilities regarding high performance computing, which will improve their potential for professional excellence.

Research limitations/implications

The implications of this research study are that the students clarified issues, such as “doubling the number of processors does not mean doubling execution speed”, and learned how to build and configure a cluster without going deeply into the complexity of the software set‐up.

Practical implications

This research provides students with the ability to gain hands‐on experience on a not very common to them but useful platform, and faculty members – from a variety of disciplines – to get more computing power for their research.

Originality/value

This paper presents a dynamic clustering system where, its versatility and flexibility with respect to configuration and functionality, together with its dynamic, strong computational power, renders it to a very helpful tool for educational and research purposes.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

John S. Atkinson, Dirk H.R. Spenneman and David Cornforth

To provide administrators at an Australian university with data on the feasibility of redirecting under‐utilised computer laboratories facilities into a distributed high

Abstract

Purpose

To provide administrators at an Australian university with data on the feasibility of redirecting under‐utilised computer laboratories facilities into a distributed high performance computing facility.

Design/methodology/approach

The individual log‐in records for each computer located in the computer laboratories at the university were investigated. The log‐in data were investigated over a 24‐hour/seven day a week period between June 2001 and August 2003. The data were analysed in terms of student access to the computer facilities during “normal” business hours, weekend times, and the semester breaks.

Findings

The computer laboratories were hugely under‐utilised, with less than 10 per cent of all log‐ins occurring during off peak times (7 pm‐8 am). Similarly, only weekends were likewise under‐utilised. This strongly suggests that this spare computer capacity could be used for alternate means during these times.

Research limitations/implications

Future research needs to determine whether the needs of the general computer laboratory user who requires a stable and secure system can coexist with the users of a high performance computer facility where different software and differently configured computer systems are required.

Practical implications

This research has the potential for universities to utilise more effectively their computer laboratory resources by allocating under‐utilised resources into other projects, such as to a high performance computing facility (HPCF). The cost of these re‐allocated resources would be a fraction of the cost compared to a scenario in which a separate dedicated HPCF had to be provided.

Originality/value

This paper suggests an alternate utilisation of the spare computing laboratory resources available at many universities.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Marco Evangelos Biancolini, Emiliano Costa, Ubaldo Cella, Corrado Groth, Gregor Veble and Matej Andrejašič

The present paper aims to address the description of a numerical optimization procedure, based on mesh morphing, and its application for the improvement of the aerodynamic…

Abstract

Purpose

The present paper aims to address the description of a numerical optimization procedure, based on mesh morphing, and its application for the improvement of the aerodynamic performance of an industrial glider which suffers of a large separation occurring in the wing–fuselage junction region at high incidence angles.

Design/methodology/approach

Shape variations were applied to the baseline configuration through a mesh morphing technique founded on the mathematical framework of radial basis functions (RBF). The aerodynamic solutions were obtained coupling an RANS code with the mesh morphing tool RBF Morph™. Two shape modifiers were set up to generate a parametric numerical model. An optimization procedure, based on a design of experiment sampling, was set up implementing the fully automated workflow within a high performance computing (HPC) environment. The optimal candidates maximizing the aerodynamic efficiency were identified by means of a cubic RBF response surface approach.

Findings

The separation was significantly reduced, modifying the local geometry of fuselage and fairing and maintaining the wing aerofoil unchanged. A relevant aerodynamic efficiency improvement was finally gained.

Practical implications

The developed procedure proved to be a very powerful and efficient tool in facing aerodynamic design problems. However, it might be computationally very expensive if a large number of design variables are adopted and, in those cases, the method can be suitably used only within the HPC environment.

Originality/value

Such an optimization study is part of an explorative set of analyses that focused on better addressing the numerical strategies to be used in the development of the EU FP7 Project RBF4AERO.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 88 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1748-8842

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Emilda Sindhu, Alex Lee and Shaik Mohamed Salim

The paper discusses how to succeed in the new economy by utilizing e‐business in transforming business processes and strategy. The Collaborative One‐Stop Virtual…

Abstract

The paper discusses how to succeed in the new economy by utilizing e‐business in transforming business processes and strategy. The Collaborative One‐Stop Virtual Engineering Services (COVES) portal provides users with collaborative engineering services for government agencies and private sectors involved in various areas like safety, health and environment. The portal helps in design through modeling and simulation over the Internet for the above sectors. The portal provides a Web‐based environment for tackling the above issues during the design of a factory via the use of e‐computational fluid dynamics. Besides the above, COVES has re‐engineered the traditional business processes associated with construction industry by integrating various enterprises. The portal also improves competitiveness by installing a strong culture of knowledge collaboration and increased accessibility to expensive highperformancecomputing (HPC) resources and tools. The integrated inter‐enterprise workflow with various public and private parties has simplified the procedure and expedites building plan approvals.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

David Cornforth, John Atkinson and Dirk H.R. Spennemann

Many researchers require access to computer facilities beyond those offered by desktop workstations. Traditionally, these are offered either through partnerships, to share…

Abstract

Purpose

Many researchers require access to computer facilities beyond those offered by desktop workstations. Traditionally, these are offered either through partnerships, to share the cost of supercomputing facilities, or through purpose‐built cluster facilities. However, funds are not always available to satisfy either of these options, and university departments are under increasing pressure to obtain the maximum return on investment. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of a low‐cost cluster computing facility using existing workstations in undergraduate computing laboratories.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on a previous feasibility study, experiments were conducted with cluster configurations of increasing size to determine the benefits and drawbacks. This was followed by identification and resolution of problems, and assessment of effects upon existing users of the computers.

Findings

A working cluster was built to supply the needs of researchers, with almost no impact upon existing users and at very little cost.

Research limitations/implications

At present, the workstations can only be used as a “processor farm” and it is unclear how MPI type processing may be achieved, because there is no guarantee of the number of workstations available at any specific time.

Practical implications

Any institution requiring access to high performance computing can build a useful resource from existing computers at minimal cost. The usefulness of the resource depends on existing computers being under utilised.

Originality/value

The novel aspect of this work is that the facility was built using existing student computing laboratories.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Andrea Gaetano Chiariello, Alessandro Formisano and Raffaele Martone

Inductances of complex coils, in the presence of linear materials only, can be computed by discretizing coils into simpler elements, whose magnetic behavior is…

Abstract

Purpose

Inductances of complex coils, in the presence of linear materials only, can be computed by discretizing coils into simpler elements, whose magnetic behavior is analytically expressible, and suitably combining elementary contributions. Reliable results require high numbers of elements. In such cases, advantages can be taken from Graphic Processor Unit (GPU) capabilities of dealing efficiently with high numbers of repeated simple computational tasks. The purpose of this paper is to set up a fast and prompt numerical procedure to cope with the above described task.

Design/methodology/approach

The coils are first decomposed into current segments, taking into account accuracy, relative position and shape of coils to determine the number of segments. An analytical formula is then used to compute elementary contributions using GPUs to speed up the process, and finally superposition is used to recover the result.

Findings

The main advantages of the proposed approach are first demonstrated using simple examples, with analytical solutions, to validate the method accuracy and promptness, then more complex cases are taken to demonstrate its generality.

Research limitations/implications

The method is intrinsically limited by the linearity assumption, excluding the presence of magnetic materials. The adopted formulas require in addition that coils must lie in free space.

Practical implications

The proposed method can help in the design of complex coils or coils systems, where the performance depends on total magnetic energy or magnetic forces among coils.

Originality/value

The paper presents an original implementation in GPU-based computational environment of a procedure to compute inductances, based on the superposition of a high number of current segments. The procedure includes an original method to self-adaptively define number and position of current segments used in the coils discretization.

Details

COMPEL: The International Journal for Computation and Mathematics in Electrical and Electronic Engineering, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0332-1649

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2015

Wasim Ahmad Bhat and S.M.K. Quadri

The purpose of this paper is to explore the challenges posed by Big Data to current trends in computation, networking and storage technology at various stages of Big Data…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the challenges posed by Big Data to current trends in computation, networking and storage technology at various stages of Big Data analysis. The work aims to bridge the gap between theory and practice, and highlight the areas of potential research.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs a systematic and critical review of the relevant literature to explore the challenges posed by Big Data to hardware technology, and assess the worthiness of hardware technology at various stages of Big Data analysis. Online computer-databases were searched to identify the literature relevant to: Big Data requirements and challenges; and evolution and current trends of hardware technology.

Findings

The findings reveal that even though current hardware technology has not evolved with the motivation to support Big Data analysis, it significantly supports Big Data analysis at all stages. However, they also point toward some important shortcomings and challenges of current technology trends. These include: lack of intelligent Big Data sources; need for scalable real-time analysis capability; lack of support (in networks) for latency-bound applications; need for necessary augmentation (in network support) for peer-to-peer networks; and rethinking on cost-effective high-performance storage subsystem.

Research limitations/implications

The study suggests that a lot of research is yet to be done in hardware technology, if full potential of Big Data is to be unlocked.

Practical implications

The study suggests that practitioners need to meticulously choose the hardware infrastructure for Big Data considering the limitations of technology.

Originality/value

This research arms industry, enterprises and organizations with the concise and comprehensive technical-knowledge about the capability of current hardware technology trends in solving Big Data problems. It also highlights the areas of potential research and immediate attention which researchers can exploit to explore new ideas and existing practices.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 115 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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