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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Cathy Parker, Nikos Ntounis, Steve Millington, Simon Quin and Fernando Rey Castillo-Villar

The purpose of this paper is to document the results and the impact of the ESRC-funded High Street UK 2020 (HSUK2020), a project designed to take the existing academic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to document the results and the impact of the ESRC-funded High Street UK 2020 (HSUK2020), a project designed to take the existing academic knowledge relating to retail and high street change directly to UK High Streets, to improve local decision-making and, ultimately, their vitality and viability.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a systematic literature review, and by following the tenets of engaged scholarship, the authors identified 201 factors that influence the vitality and viability of town centres. Through the consensus-building Delphi technique, a panel of 20 retail experts identified the top 25 priorities for action.

Findings

Taking a place management approach led to the development of a more strategic framework for regeneration, which consisted of repositioning, reinventing, rebranding and restructuring strategies (4R’s of regeneration). Collaboration with the project towns resulted in identification of the strategy area that would add the most value, and the impact of the 4R’s and the top 25 priorities is demonstrated via numerous town examples.

Originality/value

Knowledge exchange projects, such as High Street UK2020, have an important contribution to make, not by developing even more theory that is unlikely to get utilised, instead their contribution is to bring existing theory into practical use.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Gordon Fletcher, Anita Greenhill, Marie Griffiths and Rachel McLean

The purpose of this paper is to examine how independent social and commercial activities have developed in response to the perceived decline in the UK High Street and in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how independent social and commercial activities have developed in response to the perceived decline in the UK High Street and in response to the challenges of increasing digital retailing opportunities. This examination is undertaken through the lens of the social supply chain as a means to understanding, suggesting and expanding on current research regarding retailing and the UK High Street. The authors reveal some of the challenges being posed by the changing patterns of growth and consumption in cities and couple these with shifting supply chain trends.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach is used to explore the rapid advances and influence of digital technologies on businesses operating on the primary business street of suburban centre, towns or cities (described in the UK collectively as the “high street”). The research is conducted through the analytical lens of the social supply chain.

Findings

Theoretically extending the “social” in the social supply chain, the authors illustrate the usefulness of the nuanced concept of the “social supply chain” with two related strategies concerning delivery and balance. These strategies are themselves interlinked with the actions of co-creation, co-production and co-consumption. Examples of social supply chain strategies presented include retail businesses giving away something as an incentive, where the underlying requirement from the customer is that they will bring their own specialist product, skill or social network to a specified location (real or virtual).

Originality/value

For the purpose of this paper, the authors use two distinct strategies relating to delivery and balancing and in relation to the actions of co-creation, co-production and co-consumption to emphasise and analyse changes currently occurring in the UK High Street. The authors take a social supply chain management (SCM) perspective to undertake a systematic critical review of the various recent efforts undertaken by local governments, communities and trader groups to revitalise the High Street.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Nikos Ntounis and Cathy Parker

The purpose of this paper is to introduce engaged scholarship as a method for addressing the “wicked problem” of High Street change through successful collaboration and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce engaged scholarship as a method for addressing the “wicked problem” of High Street change through successful collaboration and co-production of knowledge between academics, practitioners, citizens and other place stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

The first part of this paper introduces engaged scholarship as a participatory form of research and situates it within the context of the High Street. The second part presents the case of High Street UK 2020 (HSUK2020) via Van de Ven’s diamond model of engaged scholarship as a guide.

Findings

Engaged scholarship’s focus on knowledge production and on collaboration between the research team and the community enabled us to improve the understanding of factors affecting High Streets amongst a diverse group of stakeholders and focus on what works for the towns. The ongoing impact of HSUK2020 on the project towns’ action plans and on this current research is testament to how engaged scholarship research can drive the agendas for both academics and communities.

Originality/value

The paper presents engaged scholarship as an alternative collaborative method of conducting research on the High Street, one that is more in line with the current trends in retailing and works as a motivating factor for community engagement.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 29 March 2019

Paul Michael Greenhalgh, Lynn Johnson and Victoria Huntley

Many national retailers have complained about increases in business rates tax bills since the 2017 revaluation. What impact has the 2017 business rates revaluation had on…

Abstract

Purpose

Many national retailers have complained about increases in business rates tax bills since the 2017 revaluation. What impact has the 2017 business rates revaluation had on independent high street retailers in market towns in the north of England? The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses Valuation Office Agency rating list data to determine rateable value and business rates payable for independent high street retailers in eight northern market towns either side of the 2017 rating revaluation. The data were analysed using business rates matrices to reveal the impact of the new rating list on independent retailers in the eight locations.

Findings

Analysis reveals that the majority of independent retailers in the northern market towns sampled have experienced reductions in both the rateable value of their premises and business rates payable. Increase in the rates relief threshold has extended relief to almost half of the independent retailers in the study, most of whom receive 100 per cent relief.

Practical implications

Charity shops receive at least 80 per cent rates relief which means they are able to afford to pay higher rents. This “sets the tone” for landlords setting market rents in that location which are then used as comparable evidence by the VOA when determining rateable values at revaluation further polarising the gap between rate payers and those to are exempt.

Originality/value

Focussing on independent retailers on high streets in markets towns in north of England, this study provides an alternative perspective to the orthodox view of business rates revaluations having a negative impact on retailers.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Cathy Parker, Nikos Ntounis, Simon Quin and Ian Grime

The purpose of this short article is to outline a research agenda to further our understanding of how retail areas are influenced by, and adapt to, change. This is part of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this short article is to outline a research agenda to further our understanding of how retail areas are influenced by, and adapt to, change. This is part of an Economic and Social Research Council-funded project High Street UK 2020.

Design/methodology/approach

We outline a research agenda – containing factors which High Street stakeholders in Alsager, Altrincham, Ballymena, Barnsley, Bristol, Congleton, Holmfirth, Market Rasen, Morley and Wrexham have identified as influencing the vitality and viability of their retail areas. Currently, there is little or no academic evidence available to support these factors; therefore, they are worthy of further research.

Findings

The towns assert that the following factors influence High Street performance (either positively or negatively) and need further research: business support; engagement and engaged businesses; fragmentation; information; Internet connectivity; local knowledge; measuring economic impact/value; media coverage; networking; public sector dependency and risk aversion.

Research limitations/implications

Only 10 towns have taken part in the research. Nevertheless, they are representative of the research-user community for retail centre research.

Practical implications

This research agenda will enable researchers to respond to a clear gap in our knowledge about High Street performance, as identified by towns themselves.

Social implications

By undertaking the research that people that manage retail areas need, it will enable practitioners to make better informed decisions and manage these important areas more effectively to the benefit of their local communities.

Originality/value

By allowing town centre managers, traders, council members/officials and “concerned citizens” to set the agenda for research production in the area of retail centre change, we anticipate forthcoming research in this area will be more highly valued by practitioners and have more impact in “the real world”.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

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Book part
Publication date: 5 September 2014

Wesley E. Marshall

To overview the gamut of issues that on-street parking impacts in mixed-use centers including: parking demand, land use, vehicle speed, road safety, the pedestrian…

Abstract

Purpose

To overview the gamut of issues that on-street parking impacts in mixed-use centers including: parking demand, land use, vehicle speed, road safety, the pedestrian environment, and travel behaviors.

Methodology/approach

In addition to reviewing existing literature, the following two case studies are presented. The first study explores the impact in centers built before the advent of parking regulations as compared to more contemporary, conventional developments. The second study investigates how street design factors affected vehicle speeds and safety, based on a study of over 250 roads.

Findings

On-street parking typically: serves the highest demand; is efficient in terms of land use and cost; induces lower vehicle speeds; increases safety on low-speed streets; enhances walkability; and fosters less driving, more pedestrian activity, and increased vitality.

Practical implications

On-street parking is one piece of a larger puzzle of complementary factors that influence issues such as travel behavior and safety, and therefore, it is difficult to isolate. On-street parking plays a crucial role in helping create places that are walkable, require less parking, and have more vitality. On-street parking is not purely a device to be used in the right environment; rather, it is a tool to help create that right environment.

Originality/value of chapter

Prevailing thought on the subject of on-street parking has shifted back-and-forth for generations, in part because most studies focus on one or two impacts. This chapter takes a more comprehensive approach in order to increase our understanding of on-street parking in mixed-use, commercial centers.

Details

Parking Issues and Policies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-919-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2020

Milena Vukmirovic and Suzana Gavrilović

This paper aims to present the potential of placemaking as an approach of sustainable urban facilities management and its impacts on the improvement of the planning…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the potential of placemaking as an approach of sustainable urban facilities management and its impacts on the improvement of the planning procedures which was aimed at involving citizens in the process itself. The study is based on the general concept of placemaking represented as an “overarching idea and a hands-on approach for improving a neighbourhood, city or region”, that serves as a process that “inspires people to collectively reimagine and reinvent public spaces as the heart of every community” (PPS, 2007).

Design/methodology/approach

The study used placemaking (onsite analysis, stakeholder identification, citizen survey and emotional mapping) and public participation geographic information systems (The Kernel Density tool in ArcGIS and hot spot analysis) methodologies to map problems and preferences identified by stakeholders related to particular spaces within the move formed by Maršala Birjuzova and Sremska streets in Belgrade. The research covered two-day stakeholders’ workshops including four groups of users participated in the workshop – pupils of local private high school, street residents, students of the Faculty of Forestry and the Faculty of Architecture and owners of local shops and businesses.

Findings

Research has shown that different stakeholders can offer very rational observations on the quality of a particular space and provide clear suggestions on its improvement and transformation. These proposals can be organised in the form of visions of the future appearance and functioning of the space, thus recognising the potential in the function of a sustainable urban facilities management tool in the form of creating a common idea, which will result in the creation of a common space.

Research limitations/implications

The research covered only part of the process that resulted in the creation of an idea of future public space transformation. Continued research should be conducted after the intervention, which would give a more comprehensive picture of the effects of the approach.

Practical implications

Practical implications include the presentation of the ways different groups of users perceive the actual and future transformation of the street to make this place more user-friendly and sustainable, i.e. practical example of the co-design process.

Originality/value

This paper provide an overview of the possibilities of placemaking approach seen from the perspective of sustainable urban facilities management.

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

James E. Larsen and John P. Blair

The purpose of this study is to gauge and compare the impact of surface street traffic externalities on residential properties. Limited previous research indicates that…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to gauge and compare the impact of surface street traffic externalities on residential properties. Limited previous research indicates that negative externalities dominate for single-family houses. Our objective is to verify that this result applies to our sample, and to determine if the same result extends to multi-unit rental properties.

Design/methodology/approach

Hedonic regression is used to analyze data from 9,680 single-family house transactions and 455 multi-unit rental properties to measure the influence of surface street traffic on the price of the two property types.

Findings

Houses located adjacent to an arterial street sold at a 7.8 per cent discount, on average, compared to similar houses located on collector streets. Limiting the analysis to houses adjacent to an arterial street (where traffic counts were available), price and traffic count are negatively related. The results for multi-unit rental dwellings are dramatically different. Multi-unit properties adjacent to an arterial street sold at a 13.75 per cent premium compared to similar properties on collector streets, and when limiting the analysis to properties on arterial streets, no significant relationship was detected between price and traffic volume.

Originality/value

This is the first empirical study of the influence of surface street traffic on both single-family houses and multi-unit rental residential property. Evidence is provided that traffic externalities impact the two types of properties quite differently. To the extent that this result applies to other locations, the authors suggest planners may be able to use such information to reduce the negative effect of traffic externalities on residential property associated with changes that will increase traffic flow.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Edmund O’Callaghan and Don O’Riordan

This research examined changes in Dublin’s tertiary city centre shopping streets over a 30‐year period to 2002. An observational study of the occupancy of the city’s…

Abstract

This research examined changes in Dublin’s tertiary city centre shopping streets over a 30‐year period to 2002. An observational study of the occupancy of the city’s tertiary streetscape was undertaken in the summer of 2002 and compared with historical data. Results indicate significant change over the period examined: an increased vacancy rate, a very low survival rate, a considerable incidence of non‐retail specific activities, a decline in traditional retail offerings and the emergence of new categories of retailer. The paper concludes by suggesting a proactive approach is required by present day retailers in the tertiary streets to ensure future survival.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Book part
Publication date: 25 May 2021

Vasiliki Delitheou, Efthimios Bakogiannis, Charalampos Kyriakidis and Konstantina Maria Katarachia

One of the most important effects of the financial and economic crisis is the reduction of commercial activity. Since 2013, the proportion of closed commercial properties…

Abstract

One of the most important effects of the financial and economic crisis is the reduction of commercial activity. Since 2013, the proportion of closed commercial properties in the commercial center of Athens has peaked, reaching the 32.3% of the total number of ground floor properties. This phenomenon varies from one neighborhood to another and, as a result, it is necessary to be further studied carefully across the Athens Metropolitan Area (AMA). Apart from spatial issues related to the special characteristics of the Athenian neighborhoods, another topic has to be examined: the potential relationship among the urban morphology, the use of urban spaces (accessibility, walkability, livability, etc.) and the increased number of closed commercial properties. This research is a combined study between the commercial activity in the pre- and post-crisis period and the morphological characteristics of commercial streets in three Athenian neighborhoods (Kypseli, Nea Ionia and Aghios Demetrios) that have been exploited as case studies. The purpose of the research is to understand the impact of the crisis over time and to highlight critical variations that are related to the geography of an area. Results highlight the hypothesis and thus, sustainable mobility planning may be initially considered as a regeneration policy for commercial activity in the post-crisis era.

Details

Contemporary Issues in Social Science
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-931-3

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