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Article

Shu‐Mei Tseng

In order to make knowledge management (KM) successful, the most important aspect is to nurture an appropriate organizational culture. Furthermore, many studies indicate…

Abstract

Purpose

In order to make knowledge management (KM) successful, the most important aspect is to nurture an appropriate organizational culture. Furthermore, many studies indicate that hierarchical cultures can significantly hinder the success of KM activities. The purpose of this paper, therefore, based on the antecedents of hierarchical culture, is to utilize four activities of knowledge conversion to explore the impact of hierarchical culture on the effectiveness of KM processes.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to understand the influences of hierarchical culture on knowledge conversion and KM processes, both qualitative and quantitative techniques were used to analyze the data. A case study of two large companies included interviews with several senior managers. A survey questionnaire was also administered to senior managers in 31 Taiwanese companies that had hierarchical cultures.

Findings

Through interpretative case studies and questionnaire analyses, the research finds that a hierarchical culture influences KM practices and can act as a mediator for knowledge conversion and KM processes. For instance, developing a hierarchical culture will be suitable for combination and externalization. Moreover, it would be beneficial to the implementation of KM. In contrast, it would not be helpful for socialization and internalization. In addition, it would not be beneficial to KM strategy and planning.

Research limitations/implications

The results need to be validated with a robust survey.

Practical implications

The conceptual framework provides a convenient way to illustrate the effects of hierarchical culture on knowledge conversion and KM processes. Enterprises can make corrections and adjustments accordingly to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of implementing KM through the appropriate organizational culture.

Originality/value

The paper proposes a conceptual framework to illustrate the influences of hierarchical culture on knowledge conversion and KM processes in Taiwanese organizations.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 33 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article

Heike Bruch and Frank Walter

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate hierarchical impacts on specific transformational leadership (TFL) behaviors (i.e. idealized influence

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate hierarchical impacts on specific transformational leadership (TFL) behaviors (i.e. idealized influence, inspirational motivation, intellectual stimulation, and individualized consideration).

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data on TFL, job satisfaction, and hierarchy were collected from 448 managers from a multinational corporation in Sweden.

Findings

Idealized influence and inspirational motivation occurred more frequently among upper rather than middle managers, while there were no differences for intellectual stimulation and individualized consideration. Also, idealized influence, inspirational motivation, and intellectual stimulation were more effective in strengthening subordinates' job satisfaction among upper rather than middle managers, while individualized consideration was similarly effective in both groups.

Research limitations/implications

The cross‐sectional research design precludes causal conclusions and potentially allows for common method bias. With the main research interest pertaining to hierarchical differences in TFL, however, method bias seems unlikely to fully account for the results.

Practical implications

Study results emphasize the necessity to strengthen TFL on lower managerial levels. Organizations might achieve this by cutting administrative constraints and empowering lower level leaders.

Originality/value

The study addresses repeated calls for a consideration of contextual factors in TFL research. It points to the role of hierarchy as a boundary condition of TFL.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 28 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article

Sladjana Nørskov, Peter Kesting and John Parm Ulhøi

This paper aims to present that deliberate change is strongly associated with formal structures and top-down influence. Hierarchical configurations have been used to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present that deliberate change is strongly associated with formal structures and top-down influence. Hierarchical configurations have been used to structure processes, overcome resistance and get things done. But is deliberate change also possible without formal structures and hierarchical influence?

Design/methodology/approach

This longitudinal, qualitative study investigates an open-source software (OSS) community named TYPO3. This case exhibits no formal hierarchical attributes. The study is based on mailing lists, interviews and observations.

Findings

The study reveals that deliberate change is indeed achievable in a non-hierarchical collaborative OSS community context. However, it presupposes the presence and active involvement of informal change agents. The paper identifies and specifies four key drivers for change agents’ influence.

Originality/value

The findings contribute to organisational analysis by providing a deeper understanding of the importance of leadership in making deliberate change possible in non-hierarchical settings. It points to the importance of “change-by-conviction”, essentially based on voluntary behaviour. This can open the door to reducing the negative side effects of deliberate change also for hierarchical organisations.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article

Santanu Mandal

This paper aims to explore the influence of dimensions of organizational culture, namely, development culture, group culture, rational culture and hierarchical culture, on…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the influence of dimensions of organizational culture, namely, development culture, group culture, rational culture and hierarchical culture, on healthcare supply chain resilience (HCRES). Further, the study explored the moderating role of technology orientation on organizational culture dimensions and healthcare resilience linkages.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a multi-unit study of different hospital supply chains (SCs). Consequently, perceptual data were gathered from seven dominant entities in a typical medical/hospital SC: hospitals, hotels, chemistry and pharmaceutical, marketing/public relations/promotion, medical equipment manufacturers and surgical suppliers, food and beverage providers (i.e. restaurants) and insurance providers. The responses were gathered using online survey and were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Based on 276 completed responses, positive influences were found for development, group and rational cultures on HCRES. As expected, a negative influence of hierarchical culture was found on HCRES. Further, technological orientation was found to enhance the positive effects of development, group and rational cultures on HCRES. However, no prominent moderation was noted for hierarchical culture’s influence on HCRES. The findings suggested managers to focus more on developing competing values framework (CVF)-based dimensions of organizational culture dimensions for effective risk mitigation so as to provide healthcare services in a timely manner to patients.

Originality/value

The study is the first to investigate the effects of organizational culture’s dimensions on resilience. The study has empirically established the association between CVF view and dynamic capabilities. The study underlined the importance of resilience in healthcare SCs. Resilience is an important dynamic capability in healthcare SCs to provide uninterrupted treatments and services to patients. Any failure in such a service can be fatal. Further, the study developed the measures of development, group, rational and hierarchical culture for further investigation in healthcare. This study is also the first to develop a measure for resilience in the healthcare sector.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 32 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article

Titus Oshagbemi and Roger Gill

Several studies have examined the leadership styles and behaviour of managers across hierarchical levels to see whether or not the styles and behaviour are similar. The…

Abstract

Several studies have examined the leadership styles and behaviour of managers across hierarchical levels to see whether or not the styles and behaviour are similar. The present study collected data from over 400 managers in the UK to research the topic. It found that generally there are significant differences in the leadership styles between senior and first‐level managers, but not between senior and middle‐level managers or between middle and first‐level managers. The study suggests that differences in the leadership styles practised by managers may be blurred in organisations with short chains of command, while it will tend to be pronounced in organisations with long chains of command, other things being equal. Overall, while there was a weak but statistically significant difference between the leadership styles of senior and first‐level managers, the differences in their leadership behaviour was statistically strong. The implications of these results are explored.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article

Lukas Goretzki and Martin Messner

This paper aims to examine how managers use planning meetings to coordinate their actions in light of an uncertain future. Existing literature suggests that coordination…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how managers use planning meetings to coordinate their actions in light of an uncertain future. Existing literature suggests that coordination under uncertainty requires a “dynamic” approach to planning, which is often realized in the form of rolling forecasts and frequent cross-functional exchange. Not so much is known, however, about the micro-level process through which coordination is achieved. This paper suggests that a sensemaking perspective and a focus on “planning talk” are particularly helpful to understand how actors come to a shared understanding of an uncertain future, based upon which they can coordinate their actions.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper builds upon a qualitative case study in the Austrian production site of an international manufacturing company. Drawing on a sensemaking perspective, the paper analyses monthly held “planning meetings” in which sales and production managers discuss sales forecasts for the coming months and talk about how to align demand and supply.

Findings

The authors show how collective sensemaking unfolds in planning meetings and highlight the role that “plausibilization” of expectations, “calculative reasoning” and “filtering” of information play in this process. This case analysis also sheds light on the challenges that such a sensemaking process may be subject to. In particular, this paper finds that competing hierarchical accountabilities may influence the collective sensemaking process and render coordination more challenging.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the hitherto limited management accounting and control literature on operational planning, especially its coordination function. It also extends the management accounting and control literature that draws on the concept of sensemaking. The study shows how actors involved in planning meetings create a common understanding of the current and future situation and what sensemaking mechanisms facilitate this process. In this respect, this paper is particularly interested in the role that accounting and other types of numbers can play in this context. Furthermore, it theorizes on the conditions that allow managers to overcome concerns with hierarchical accountabilities and enact socializing forms of accountability, which is often necessary to come to agreements on actions to be taken.

Details

Qualitative Research in Accounting & Management, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1176-6093

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Article

Tony Manning, Graham Pogson and Zoë Morrison

The purpose of this paper is to model the relationship between influencing behaviour, personality traits, work roles and role orientation. It builds on previous research

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to model the relationship between influencing behaviour, personality traits, work roles and role orientation. It builds on previous research into team roles, highlighting the relationship between influencing behaviour and team role behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

Statistical analysis on questionnaire data from a mixed, work‐based, UK sample is used to assess relationships between influencing behaviour, role expectations, role orientation and team role behaviour.

Findings

The paper argues that team roles access different types of power and influencing behaviours depending on role and role orientation. Findings establish a link between influencing behaviour and team role behaviour, as well as personality traits, developing the idea that there is a significant social dimension to team roles.

Research limitations/implications

The research does not consider specific influence attempts, nor does it present evidence regarding the effectiveness of patterns of influencing behaviour in particular contexts.

Practical implications

The paper highlights the relationship between influencing behaviour and personality and contextual variables. Considering “when” different strategies and styles are used may offer guidelines for action. Findings reinforce the significance of the social dimension of team roles and indicate a need for further research to consider the success of influencing behaviour in different contexts.

Originality/value

Previous research into influencing behaviour has focused on its relationship to either situational variables or personality traits and, where personality variable have been studied, they have been specific traits. This research considers both sets of variables simultaneously and covers the whole personality domain. This is the first study of the relationship between team role behaviour and influencing behaviour.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article

Darcy McCormack, Nikola Djurkovic, Apollo Nsubuga-Kyobe and Gian Casimir

The purpose of this paper is to examine if the gender of the perpetrator and the gender of the target have interactive effects on the frequency of downward workplace…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine if the gender of the perpetrator and the gender of the target have interactive effects on the frequency of downward workplace bullying to which targets are subjected.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional design was used on a sample of 125 schoolteachers in Uganda. Self-report data on downward workplace bullying were obtained using the Negative Acts Questionnaire.

Findings

The perpetrator’s gender and the target’s gender have interactive effects on the level of downward bullying to which targets are subjected. Although targets in within-gender dyads reported higher levels of overall downward workplace bullying than did targets in between-gender dyads, a significant gender-gender interaction was found for personal harassment and work-related harassment but not for intimidation nor organisational harassment.

Research limitations/implications

The generalisability of the findings is limited due to the sample consisting entirely of schoolteachers in Uganda. Self-report data are a limitation as they are subjective and thus susceptible to various perceptual biases (e.g. social desirability, personality of the respondent). Examining the interactive effects of gender on workplace bullying helps to provide a better understanding of the potential influence of gender in bullying scenarios. The findings from research that considers only the main effects of gender whilst ignoring interactive effects can misinform any theory or policy development.

Practical implications

Organisations need to resocialise their members so that they learn new attitudes and norms regarding aggressive behaviour in the workplace.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature on workplace bullying by examining the interactive effects of gender on the frequency of downward workplace bullying.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Content available
Article

Kate V. Morland, Dermot Breslin and Fionn Stevenson

This paper aims to examine multiple learning cycles across a UK housebuilder organization following changes made to their quality management routine at the organizational…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine multiple learning cycles across a UK housebuilder organization following changes made to their quality management routine at the organizational level, through to subsequent understanding and enactment at the level of the individuals involved.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a qualitative case study methodology based on an analysis of six-weeks of participant observation, semi-structured ethnographic interviews and documentation within three of the organization’s regional offices. Through an abductive process, it draws on gathered data and extant literature to develop a multi-level learning model.

Findings

Four levels of learning cycles are observed within the model: individual, team (within which inter-organizational relationships nest), region and organization. Three inter-related factors are identified as influencing feed-forward and feedback across the levels: time, communication and trust. The impact of these levels and factors on the process of learning is conceptualized through the metaphor of coupling and decoupling and discussed using examples from housing development projects.

Originality/value

While previous models of organizational learning highlight important multi-level interaction effects, they do not explore how the different levels of learning synchronize over time for learning to move between them. This paper addresses this gap by shedding important light on how layers of learning synchronize and why and when this can occur within multi-level organizations.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article

Gyles Glover, Rebecca Lee and Alison Copeland

This paper seeks to discuss the development of a prototype index of the factors influencing mental wellbeing in local areas in England.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to discuss the development of a prototype index of the factors influencing mental wellbeing in local areas in England.

Design/methodology/approach

To support developments in mental health policy, a prototype version of an index of the extent of factors affecting wellbeing was developed for the 149 local government areas (local authorities). The work was based on a well‐developed conceptualisation of factors affecting mental wellbeing set out in a current Department of Health background paper. This identified five domains of relevant factors with positive and negative influences in each. For each of the five domains (“a positive start in life”, “resilience and a safe and secure base”, “integrated physical and mental health” “sustainable, connected communities”, and “meaning and purpose”), the authors attempted to find proxy measures of positive and risk factors among routinely collected government statistics. This proved difficult; measures for positive factors in three domains and risk factors in four domains were identified. These were combined to give scores for overall positive and negative influences on wellbeing and a resulting overall index. This was done using the methods developed for the English Index of Multiple Deprivation.

Findings

Positive factor scores are generally higher in rural areas, particularly the West Midlands, Bedfordshire, and Cambridgeshire, a southerly strip from Somerset and Dorset to Surrey, and Yorkshire, and Northumberland in the north. In London, Richmond, Bromley, and Havering score highly. High‐risk factor scores are generally seen in most urban areas, with a band of high scores from Liverpool and Manchester, through the West Yorkshire towns to Hull and Scunthorpe, clusters in the North East around Tyneside and Teesside and central London, particularly Hackney, Haringey, Islington, Southwark, Lambeth, and Kensington and Chelsea. In London, Richmond, Harrow, and Redbridge have notably low scores. Some notable regional differences were seen in the patterns of positive and risk rankings. The North East, Yorkshire and the Humber, and the North West stand out as having generally higher positive scores for any level of risk than Midland and Southern regions; London authorities have the lowest positive – in relation to risk scores.

Originality/value

The authors hope that the publication of a pilot study may prove helpful in identifying some of the issues which will need to be tackled if a fully working index in this area is to be developed.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

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