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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Abdulrahman Alrabiah and Steve Drew

This paper first aims to examine how business process change decisions (BPCDs) were implemented in a government organisation bound by tightly coupled temporal constraints…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper first aims to examine how business process change decisions (BPCDs) were implemented in a government organisation bound by tightly coupled temporal constraints (TTCs). Second, it focuses on how to achieve optimal and efficient BPCDs that require tight compliance with regulators’ temporal constraints. Finally, it formulates a rigorous framework that can facilitate the execution of optimal BPCDs with maximum efficiency and minimal effort, time and cost.

Design/methodology/approach

Decision-making biases by individuals or groups in organisations can impede optimal BPC implementation; to demonstrate this, a case study is investigated and the formulated framework is applied to tackle these failings.

Findings

The case study analysis shows 76 per cent of the BPCDs implemented were inefficient, mostly because of poor decisions, and these resulted in negative ripple effects. In response, the newly developed hierarchical change management structure (HCMS) framework was used to empower organisations to execute high-velocity BPCDs, enabling them to handle any temporal constraints imposed by regulators or other exogenous factors. The HCMS framework was found to be highly effective, scoring an average improvement of more than 100 per cent when measured using decision quality dimensions. This paper would be of value for business executives and strategic decision makers engaging with BPC.

Research limitations/implications

The HCMS framework has been applied in a single case study as a proof of concept. Future research could extend its application to broader domains that have multi-attribute structures and environments. The evaluation processes of the proposed framework are based on subjective metrics. Causal links from the framework to business process metrics will provide a more complete performance picture.

Practical implications

The outcome of this research assists in formulating a systematic BPCD framework that is otherwise unavailable. The practical use of the proposed framework would potentially impact on quality outcomes for organisations. The model is derived from decision trees and analytical hierarchical processes and is tailored to address this problematic area. The proposed HCMS framework would help organisations to execute efficient BPCDs with minimal time, effort and cost. The HCMS framework contributes to the academic literature on BPCD that leverages diverse stakeholders to engage in BPC initiatives.

Originality/value

The research presents a novel framework –HCMS – that provides a platform for organisations to easily determine and solve hierarchical decision structure problems, thereby allowing them to efficiently automate and institutionalise optimal BPCDs.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1977

Yoram Zeira and Ehud Harari

The staffing policy of most multinational corporations (MNCs) is increasingly criticized as being discriminatory and counter to multinationalization. Despite professed…

Abstract

The staffing policy of most multinational corporations (MNCs) is increasingly criticized as being discriminatory and counter to multinationalization. Despite professed adherence to the principle of staffing top positions according to merit rather than nationality, MNCs tend to do otherwise. They prefer to reserve the top positions in their subsidiaries for parent‐country managers (PCMs), or to limit the managerial staff in their subsidiaries to host‐country managers (HCMs). Naturally, these policies do not represent a multinational approach; the first gives preference to PCMs at HQ and in the subsidiaries, and the second makes it almost impossible for HCMs to reach top positions at HQ or in subsidiaries outside their home country.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 27 January 2021

Mei Peng Low and Heath Spong

This research aims to examines the impact of micro-level corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices on employee engagement within the public accounting firm setting.

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to examines the impact of micro-level corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices on employee engagement within the public accounting firm setting.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses a quantitative approach with a survey instrument as the data collection tool. A total of 269 complete responses were collected from employees working in the public accounting firms. Micro-level CSR practices were analysed with a hierarchical component model (HCM) in partial least square structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) to examine the influence of such practices on employee engagement. A predictive performance metric was applied to assess the out-of-sample prediction.

Findings

This study uncovers a positive and significant relationship between micro-level CSR practices and employee engagement. Furthermore, the PLSpredict results indicate that the current model possesses high predictive power with all indicators in the PLS-SEM analysis demonstrating lower root mean squared error (RMSE) values compared to the naïve linear regression model benchmark.

Research limitations/implications

While the methods applied in this analysis are at the frontier of CSR research, the present study has not explored the heterogeneity amongst groups of respondents and size of accounting firms. Sampling weight adjustment for the purposes of representativeness was not used in the current research. These could be the subject of future work in this area.

Practical implications

These research findings shed light on the positive manifestation effect of micro-level CSR practices at firm level as well as individual level. Through micro-level CSR practices, firms can reap the benefits of enhanced employee engagement, which leads to productive workforce while also facilitating increased employees’ intrinsic job satisfaction.

Social implications

Micro-level CSR practices address the needs of the millennium workforce, whereby employees are no longer solely focussed on pay checks as their compensation. Employees are seeking out employers whose CSR practices appeal to their social conscience. Micro-level CSR practices meet the needs of the contemporary workforce yet enable companies to attract and retain skilled employees.

Originality/value

The originality of this research is attributed to the vigorous statistical analysis by the use of HCMs and PLSpredict in PLS-SEM context for the assessment of predictive performance. Also, micro-level CSR practices are conceptualised in HCM for parsimonious purpose.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

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Book part
Publication date: 15 January 2010

Denis Bolduc and Ricardo Alvarez-Daziano

The search for flexible models has led the simple multinomial logit model to evolve into the powerful but computationally very demanding mixed multinomial logit (MMNL…

Abstract

The search for flexible models has led the simple multinomial logit model to evolve into the powerful but computationally very demanding mixed multinomial logit (MMNL) model. That flexibility search lead to discrete choice hybrid choice models (HCMs) formulations that explicitly incorporate psychological factors affecting decision making in order to enhance the behavioral representation of the choice process. It expands on standard choice models by including attitudes, opinions, and perceptions as psychometric latent variables.

In this paper we describe the classical estimation technique for a simulated maximum likelihood (SML) solution of the HCM. To show its feasibility, we apply it to data of stated personal vehicle choices made by Canadian consumers when faced with technological innovations.

We then go beyond classical methods, and estimate the HCM using a hierarchical Bayesian approach that exploits HCM Gibbs sampling considering both a probit and a MMNL discrete choice kernel. We then carry out a Monte Carlo experiment to test how the HCM Gibbs sampler works in practice. To our knowledge, this is the first practical application of HCM Bayesian estimation.

We show that although HCM joint estimation requires the evaluation of complex multi-dimensional integrals, SML can be successfully implemented. The HCM framework not only proves to be capable of introducing latent variables, but also makes it possible to tackle the problem of measurement errors in variables in a very natural way. We also show that working with Bayesian methods has the potential to break down the complexity of classical estimation.

Details

Choice Modelling: The State-of-the-art and The State-of-practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-773-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1994

Daniel Bollinger

Examines Russian cultural values and discusses their implications formanagement systems in Russian organizations today. Using Hofstede′s fourcultural dimensions, combines…

Abstract

Examines Russian cultural values and discusses their implications for management systems in Russian organizations today. Using Hofstede′s four cultural dimensions, combines the conclusions and observations of the author with literary references and proverbs. Gives valuable insight into Russian mentality and, hence, into how their management systems can be developed in the future.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2021

Liuying Zhu and Sai On Cheung

This study conceptualizes the equity gap (EG) in construction contracting and examines its impact on project performance.

Abstract

Purpose

This study conceptualizes the equity gap (EG) in construction contracting and examines its impact on project performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The identification of EG was first summarized from a literature review. A conceptual framework that included EG elements of information, risks, expected return and power asymmetry was then proposed. A study of the Hong Kong–Zhuhai–Macau Bridge supported the existence of EG. The framework was further refined by incorporation of 21 EG identifications. To examine the reliability of the framework, data were collected from 106 senior project professionals to evaluate the extent to which EG identification occurred in their projects. A Partial Least Square–Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM hereafter) analysis was conducted on the collected data.

Findings

The proposed framework was deemed statistically significant. Furthermore, no significant differences were detected between the developer and contractor. The concepts of asset and process specificities suggested that the unaddressed EG may be met with retaliatory behaviors, such as noncooperation, procrastination, opportunism and withdrawal, as the physical works proceed. These behaviors may also hamper project performance.

Practical implications

To address the EG ex post, it is suggested that relational incentives to balance the power differential be set, reallocation of risks and return and enhancing task programmability for ease of monitoring and performance evaluation.

Originality/value

This study investigates the downside of the EG between the contracting parties. The proposed EG framework informs the project management of critical EG elements and possible methods to narrow the gap ex post. Practical suggestions are also provided to manage construction contracts in general and in the use of incentive schemes to address EG.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Dimitrios M. Mihail and Panagiotis V. Kloutsiniotis

Following a social identity approach focussed in the Greek healthcare sector, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating effects of social identification on…

Abstract

Purpose

Following a social identity approach focussed in the Greek healthcare sector, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating effects of social identification on the relationship between high-performance work systems (HPWS) and psychological empowerment, and the mediating role of psychological empowerment between HPWS and quality of patient care.

Design/methodology/approach

Partial least squares-structural equation modeling was used in a sample of 297 nurses, doctors, and allied health professionals across seven hospitals in Greece.

Findings

The findings suggest that HPWS has a strong effect on healthcare professionals’ social identification, which in turn partially mediates the relationship between HPWS and psychological empowerment. In addition, psychological empowerment indirectly mediates the relationship between HPWS and quality of patient care.

Practical implications

The findings not only validate previous studies’ conclusions, but also provide evidence for the potential fruitfulness of the HPWS approach from a social identity perspective. In addition, it is also confirmed that without the presence of psychological empowerment, HPWS may have limited impact on the quality of patient care.

Originality/value

Although HPWS have been generally connected with positive employee attitudes and behaviors, few studies choose to follow a social identity approach in examining these relationships. Finally, this study confirms the argument that HPWS can be a fruitful approach even in a country severely affected by Europe’s debt crisis over the last five years.

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Article
Publication date: 10 December 2020

ShiNa Li, Lawrence Hoc Nang Fong, Carol Xiaoyue Zhang and Mengxin Chen

This paper aims to identify peer-to-peer accommodation hosts’ perceived motivations and constraints, to examine the prediction of the motivation and constraint factors on…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify peer-to-peer accommodation hosts’ perceived motivations and constraints, to examine the prediction of the motivation and constraint factors on hosts’ intention to continue business based on hosts’ attitudes and to explore the moderating role of the business scale.

Design/methodology/approach

A scale for hosts’ perceived motivators and constraints was developed. Mixed methods were used to develop and analyse a conceptual framework for demonstrating how constraints and motivations influence hosts’ behavioural intentions. Findings from interviews with hosts interpretatively supported the survey results.

Findings

Chinese hosts’ perceived constraints and motivators are identified and explained. The survey results indicate that constraints lower intention to continue one’s business and motivators heightens it. Motivators have a higher effect on attitudes and intentions than constraints do. The business scale was confirmed as a moderator in the constraint–attitude link but not in the motivator–attitude relationship.

Practical implications

This paper offers policy implications for governments, online platforms and hosts in terms of establishing incentives and solving problems so that Chinese hosts can sustainably operate their businesses.

Originality/value

This paper identifies constraints and motivators and develops a measurement scale for both simultaneously, which provides a holistic explanation of hosts’ attitude and behavioural intention. It also reveals the moderating role of the business scale. In investigating the thoughts of existing hosts operating on global and local platforms in China, this paper complements the literature, which mainly focuses on the Western context and a single global platform.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2019

Pallavi R. Kamath, Yogesh P. Pai and Nandan K.P. Prabhu

The purpose of this paper is to advance research on the relationship between customer experience and customer loyalty by exploring the serially mediating roles of brand…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to advance research on the relationship between customer experience and customer loyalty by exploring the serially mediating roles of brand equity and customer satisfaction and the moderating roles of age, gender, education and family income in the retail banking industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 500 responses of retail banking customers were used to test the model using the partial least squares structural equation modeling approach. Advanced statistical techniques, such as importance-performance map analysis and a joint application of FIMIX-PLS and PLS-POS, were used to gain new insights.

Findings

The study highlighted that the relationship between customer experience and loyalty is serially mediated by brand equity and customer satisfaction. Age, gender and education were found to be significant moderators in the customer experience–loyalty relationship. Age and gender were found to be significant moderators in the brand equity–loyalty relationship.

Practical implications

The study strongly suggests that practitioners not only focus on delivering exceptional customer experiences but also on providing leverage brand equity and satisfaction to build customer loyalty. Practitioners should focus on training their front-line employees to improve the quality of their behavior and relations with customers and thereby build customer loyalty.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to explore the mediating role of several variables sequentially and the moderating role of customer demographics in the customer experience–customer loyalty relationship.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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