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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

Patience Seebohm

During a consultation with Black and minority ethnic communities in 2002, some 300 people shared their ideas and experiences about how Black and minority ethnic people…

Abstract

During a consultation with Black and minority ethnic communities in 2002, some 300 people shared their ideas and experiences about how Black and minority ethnic people with mental health problems fare in the employment market. Everyone is encouraged to combat racism by rejecting low expectations and harnessing hidden talents.

Details

A Life in the Day, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Philip Morgan and Jackie Lawson

Since 2010, Dorset HealthCare University NHS Trust has been running a Hidden Talents project seeking to better understand how mental health services can value the lived…

Abstract

Purpose

Since 2010, Dorset HealthCare University NHS Trust has been running a Hidden Talents project seeking to better understand how mental health services can value the lived experience of their staff. The purpose of this paper is to inform discussions on how clinicians and other staff can share their lived experience of mental health problems to improve the experience of people who access services, their carers and supporters and promote the wellbeing of all staff.

Design/methodology/approach

The discussion paper was developed through the use of qualitative data collected through three focus groups. One of the focus groups represented people who are part of the Hidden Talents Project, one focus group had representatives of the different professional bodies and the third represented people who access services.

Findings

It was identified that there were two differing considerations between sharing personal experience one was sharing with people who access services, the other was sharing with colleagues and managers. It was identified that in order to safely share personal experience it needed to happen in an supportive organisational culture. A number of suggestions were made as to considered why, when, how and what to share with people who access services.

Research limitations/implications

This is not a formal piece of research, rather it is an exploration of a range of views and set out into a discussion document. Further action and research is required to explore this topic area in more detail.

Originality/value

At present a number of mental health services are beginning to address the value of lived experience in the workforce. Very little has been published exploring how people can share their live experience. This paper provides a starting point for these discussions.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Alex Linley

Early career recruiters are increasingly focused on finding hidden talent and empowering social mobility, while also managing the reality of large recruitment volumes. A…

Abstract

Purpose

Early career recruiters are increasingly focused on finding hidden talent and empowering social mobility, while also managing the reality of large recruitment volumes. A new approach to early careers recruitment solved both of these conflicting challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a combination of assessment insights, data analytics and strengths-based recruitment, the Nestlé early careers recruitment process was redesigned. Jobmi mindset assessments, the Capp Situational Strengths Test and the Capp Numerical Reasoning Test were used as online assessments, followed by a strengths-based video interview and strengths-based assessment centres.

Findings

Nestlé identified and hired candidates of whom 21 per cent would not have met the previous screening criteria, demonstrating how the new recruitment approach found hidden talent.

Practical implications

Making decisions from assessment insights and data analytics shows that it is possible for volume recruiters to manage, enhance and improve their recruitment processes without need for recourse to arbitrary screening criteria to manage volumes.

Social implications

Finding hidden talent and empowering social mobility widen opportunity for all people, particularly those from diverse backgrounds. It allows the identification and recruitment of people who demonstrate grit, resolve and tenacity, who might otherwise have been excluded by arbitrary recruitment barriers.

Originality/value

The article concludes with five best practice recommendations for finding hidden talent and promoting social mobility: do not use arbitrary screening criteria; make decisions from assessment insights and data analytics; guard against adverse impact; measure for future potential, not just past experience; and give candidates second chances by being part of a job-matching marketplace.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Carole Tansley, Ella Hafermalz and Kristine Dery

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between the use of sophisticated talent selection processes such as gamification and training and development…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between the use of sophisticated talent selection processes such as gamification and training and development interventions designed to ensure that candidates can successfully navigate the talent assessment process. Gamification is the application of game elements to non-game activities through the adoption of gaming tools, and little is known about how candidates (“talent”) struggle to learn about the structural mechanics of gamification as they engage with the hidden rules of talent selection, such as goals, rules, “levelling up”, feedback and engagement in competitive – collaborative activities. The term “talent development gamification” is coined and used as an analytical tool to consider how young talent are supported by development interventions in their inter-subjectivity as they learn how to survive and win in talent selection games.

Design/methodology/approach

Studying hidden dynamics in development processes inherent in gamified talent selection is challenging, so a cult work of fiction, “Ender’s Game”, is examined to address the questions: “How do candidates in talent selection programmes learn to make sense of the structural mechanics of gamification”, “How does this make the hidden rules of talent selection explicit to them?” and “What does this mean for talent development?”

Findings

Talent development in selection gamification processes is illustrated through nuanced theoretical accounts of how a multiplicity of shifting and competing developmental learning opportunities are played out as a form of “double-consciousness” by potential organizational talent for them to “win the selection game”.

Research limitations/implications

Using novels as an aid to understanding management and the organization of work is ontologically and epistemologically problematic. But analysing novels which are “good reads” also has educational value and can produce new knowledge from its analysis. In exploring how “Characters are made to live dangerously, to face predicaments that, as readers, we experience as vicarious pleasure. We imagine, for example, how a particular character may react or, more importantly, what we would do in similar circumstances” (Knights and Willmott, 1999, p. 5). This future-oriented fictional narrative is both illustrative and provides an analogy to illuminate current organisational development challenges.

Originality/value

The term “talent development gamification in selection processes” is coined to allow analysis and provide lessons for talent development practice in a little studied area. Our case study analysis identifies a number of areas for consideration by talent management/talent development specialists involved in developing talent assessment centres incorporating gamification. These include the importance of understanding and taking account of rites of passage through the assessment centre, in particular the role of liminal space, what talent development interventions might be of benefit and the necessity of appreciating and managing talent in developing the skill of double consciousness in game simulations.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 40 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 18 October 2011

Doug Williamson

The article aims to advance the view that, in order for organizations to win in the marketplace, they will have to shift their focus to “identifying potential” rather than

Abstract

Purpose

The article aims to advance the view that, in order for organizations to win in the marketplace, they will have to shift their focus to “identifying potential” rather than solely being focused on “managing potential”.

Design/methodology/approach

The article makes the point that the leader of the future will need to have a rich experience repertoire, broad cognitive abilities, an exploration mindset and the ability to attract talented people.

Findings

It is argued that managing and measuring performance of people is no longer the primary workforce‐management issue, but prospecting and accurately evaluating potential are critical to long‐term success.

Practical implications

The article contends that identifying then releasing talent will create winning conditions. It describes some of the qualities that will be needed in future, if organizations are to adapt to the massive social changes taking place around them.

Originality/value

Organizations that do not understand how social and generational changes relate to their business model will find themselves at a disadvantage for relevance and economic prosperity in the future.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2020

Alex Anlesinya and Kwesi Amponsah-Tawiah

This study aims to critically examine talent management practices and strategies from ethical and responsible management perspectives.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to critically examine talent management practices and strategies from ethical and responsible management perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

It achieves its aim through conceptual analysis by theorising through the lenses of talent philosophies, the organisational justice theory, the stakeholder theory and extant literature.

Findings

A responsible talent management construct and mode to guide the practice of talent management in a socially responsible way is developed. It argues that inclusivity; corporate responsibility; and equity and equal employment opportunity are the key underlying principles of a responsible talent management system. This study further argues that responsible talent management practices promote achievement of multilevel sustainable outcomes such as decent work, employee well-being and organisational well-being.

Practical implications

Emphasising responsible management and ethical concerns in organisational talent strategies and practices is non-negotiable, given the current level of interest in sustainable work and employment and in the quest to achieve sustainable human and organisational outcomes through management and organisational practices.

Originality/value

The development of a responsible talent management construct and model is original and novel and is expected to shape thinking and drive new research directions in the field of talent management. It further contributes directly to knowledge and practice by demonstrating how organisations can manage their talents in a responsible way.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 44 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Maria Golubovskaya, David Solnet and Richard N.S. Robinson

This paper aims to challenge existing assumptions in talent management (TM) research, showcasing a misalignment between commonly held assumptions and the characteristics…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to challenge existing assumptions in talent management (TM) research, showcasing a misalignment between commonly held assumptions and the characteristics of the youth-intensive hospitality sector workforce.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a review of the TM literature, Piirto’s educational talent pyramid is adopted to conceptualize a recalibration. Drawing on multidisciplinary literatures (i.e. adolescent development, youth employment, positive psychology), and adopting a (talent) developmental approach, a reframing of prevalent TM discourses is enunciated based on the logic that the hospitality workforce is predominantly in a developmental state.

Findings

TM discourses are misaligned with the workforce composition of the hospitality industry, which is dominated by young, often unexperienced, workers. The need for dramatically recalibrated TM structures and underlying assumptions, centred around a greater attention to the “development” of talent and a more employee-focused and inclusive approach, can facilitate greater alignment between TM and hospitality.

Research limitations/implications

This paper extends a body of work advocating for more inclusive TM and developmental postures. The contribution, via a hospitality industry context, has been to create linkages between talent- and youth-development discourses.

Practical implications

This paper outlines a number of implications, among which are a pathway forward for hospitality industry to rebuild its poor HRM image and conversion of “transient” hospitality jobs to career jobs (for youth).

Originality/value

This paper identifies youth as a distinct workforce entity and suggests that hospitality jobs represent a critical developmental context for young people, resulting in a series of critical implications for TM practice and theorizing.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

A learning center is helping to boost training and uncover hidden talents among the workforce of a medium‐size printing firm. A warehouseman at the 90‐employee Forest…

Abstract

A learning center is helping to boost training and uncover hidden talents among the workforce of a medium‐size printing firm. A warehouseman at the 90‐employee Forest Press, who had no formal information‐technology (IT) qualification but had practised extensively on a home computer, was given the opportunity to prove his knowledge at the learning center and progress on to the next course. He rose to the challenge and is now taking a graphic‐design course that could lead to a job in the firm’s graphics center.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1993

Karen Myers

Examines the AA′s method of training staff by empowerment based on encouraging customer care skills, team leadership abilities and team‐building initiatives. Concludes…

Abstract

Examines the AA′s method of training staff by empowerment based on encouraging customer care skills, team leadership abilities and team‐building initiatives. Concludes that managers need to learn to adapt to this empowerment in order to take advantage of the “hidden talents” of staff.

Details

Training for Quality, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4875

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2007

Alice Snell

Using the case‐study examples of Dow and UnitedHealth Group and a selection of research papers, Alice Snell, vice president of Taleo Research, explores the ways in which…

Abstract

Using the case‐study examples of Dow and UnitedHealth Group and a selection of research papers, Alice Snell, vice president of Taleo Research, explores the ways in which you can help control HR’s financial burden. She highlights four key areas where HR can cut costs: by accelerating the hiring process, reducing high turnover, avoiding exposure to legal implications and cutting the costs of temporary work.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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