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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Emily Boyle

Entrepreneurial brand building is an area of study in its infancy. The nature of entrepreneurship which typically implies serious limitations on the availability of…

Abstract

Entrepreneurial brand building is an area of study in its infancy. The nature of entrepreneurship which typically implies serious limitations on the availability of resources suggests that entrepreneurs need to take an unconventional approach to brand building. This article provides an analysis of how one entrepreneurial manufacturing concern in the UK, Dyson Appliances, successfully built a strong brand of vacuum cleaners during the 1990s. In particular it considers the importance of brand image and the role of product attributes and the development of the brand’s personality in creating this. It argues that a key aspect of a brand’s personality is its values and therefore one of the tasks of brand builders is to find a way of imbuing the brand with these values. One of the richest sources of society’s values is mythology, which emphasizes especially the values of its heroes. A brand can be imbued with these values through association with mythology. This was the approach adopted by Dyson Appliances as it built its vacuum cleaners into a leading national brand.

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Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2013

Paul Moxnes

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of archetypes on collective fantasies and covert ideations and argue that archetypal fantasies, dreams and emotions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the effects of archetypes on collective fantasies and covert ideations and argue that archetypal fantasies, dreams and emotions impact organisational performance all the way down to the bottom line.

Design/methodology/approach

The author maintains that role‐figures in fairy tales and mythology can teach us significant lessons about the management of organisations. The impact of the Hero archetype is elaborated in particular.

Findings

In order to manage hidden, yet important, dimensions of organisational life, the study of managerial behaviour should focus more on archetypal dimensions of human interaction.

Originality/value

The paper asserts that allowing scholars, management, and leadership practitioners to study organisational behaviour and cultural patterns from an archetypal perspective, offers prospects of more effective leadership and decision making.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Book part
Publication date: 26 February 2013

Arch G. Woodside, Suresh Sood and Karlan M. Muniz

The main thesis here is that the stories that some brands tell to consumers enable consumers to achieve archetypal experiences. Examining the stories consumers tell in…

Abstract

The main thesis here is that the stories that some brands tell to consumers enable consumers to achieve archetypal experiences. Examining the stories consumers tell in natural contexts involving shopping for and using brands informs explanations of associations of archetypes, brands, and consumers. The study advances the use of degrees-of-freedom analysis (DFA) and creating visual narrative art (VNA) as useful steps for confirming or disconfirming whether or not the stories consumers tell have themes, events, and outcomes that match with the core storylines told by brands. As a proposal, an extension of thematic apperception tests (TATs) is relevant in applying the DFA to brand-consumer storytelling research. The study includes a review of early work on TATs, DFA, archetypal theory, and how brands become icons. The study's theory, method, and findings provide useful tools for brand managers and researchers on issues that relate to psychology and marketing.

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Olivia Efthimiou

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate heroism as an embodied system of leadership and well-being. Heroic leadership is presented as a baseline for sustainable…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate heroism as an embodied system of leadership and well-being. Heroic leadership is presented as a baseline for sustainable futures and global health.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents an embodied reading of heroic leadership and its sustainable development across five stages. It outlines its core functions, its grounding in self-leadership through physical and mental trauma and its holistic benefits, resulting in the development of the Heroic Leadership Embodiment and Sustainable Development (HLESD) model. The efficacy of HLESD is demonstrated in an empirical case study of heroism promotion and education: the Hero Construction Company and the Heroic Imagination Project.

Findings

Heroic leadership is revealed as an emergent, dynamic and distributed form of sustainable development.

Research limitations/implications

This paper demonstrates the critical connections between heroism, sustainability, embodied leadership and well-being and how they stand to benefit from each other, individuals and communities at large.

Social implications

The implementation of HLESD in educational, counselling and broader contexts in consultation with a wide range of professionals stands to offer significant benefits to pedagogies, clinical practice, holistic therapies and twenty-first-century societies, at both the community and policy level.

Originality/value

The emerging field of heroism science and the use of heroic leadership as an interdisciplinary tool is a novel approach to well-being, which holds immense potential for the imagining and fostering of sustainable personal and collective futures.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Natalia Velikova, Steve Charters, Joanna Fountain, Caroline Ritchie, Nicola Fish and Tim Dodd

The purpose of this paper is to test Luna and Gupta’s (2001) investigative framework on the interaction of cultural values and consumer behaviour by conducting a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test Luna and Gupta’s (2001) investigative framework on the interaction of cultural values and consumer behaviour by conducting a cross-cultural comparison of young wine consumers’ interpretation of images of champagne and sparkling wine. The research examined consumer responses to the images through the prism of the relationship between symbolism, ritual and myth, as well as other related values.

Design/methodology/approach

In a series of focus groups with consumers from four anglophone countries (the USA, New Zealand, Australia and the UK), six images of champagne and sparkling wine were used as stimuli to encourage affective and cognitive perspectives on the topic.

Findings

Overall, the UK market showed distinct differences from the other markets, due very much to its cultural context. The UK consumers valued traditional advertising; focused mainly on the product itself; and did not associate champagne with fun. Respondents from the New World focused on the general impression of the image and on enjoyment and fun associated with consumption of champagne and sparkling wine.

Practical implications

The most crucial implication of this research is the cultural variation in consumer perceptions of champagne and sparkling wine and the impact that it has upon marketing strategies on how to market this product category to younger consumers in different markets.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the study of cultural values and consumption behaviour, as well as image effectiveness in forming perceptions of the product category.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

Liam Gorman

The study of corporate culture is a valuable contribution to thestudy of organisations. Corporate culture consists of values, norms,feelings, hopes and aspirations held by…

Abstract

The study of corporate culture is a valuable contribution to the study of organisations. Corporate culture consists of values, norms, feelings, hopes and aspirations held by members of organisations. These aspects may not be instantly discernible; however, it is important that managers are aware of culture; a shared culture contributes greatly to company success. The article concludes that managers can manage culture and cultural change by becoming more aware of the deeper assumptions of culture and how they are upheld.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2019

Maud Ceuterick and Mark R. Johnson

Contemporary cinema and video games express considerable skepticism toward the colonization of further planets. Contemporary films including Elysium and Passengers depict…

Abstract

Contemporary cinema and video games express considerable skepticism toward the colonization of further planets. Contemporary films including Elysium and Passengers depict space travel as the prolongation of inequalities within human civilization, while others such as Gravity and The Martian predict a rebirth of the human species through technological advances and space travel limited to a lucky few. Games, meanwhile, explore topics ranging from private spaceflight to the genetic modification required for long-term space habitation, especially in EVE Online, which we focus on in this chapter. Although both contemporary films and games celebrate technological advances, these media also show that multiple inequalities lurk behind the celebratory human renewal into a multiplanetary species.

Details

Space Tourism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-495-9

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Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2019

James Ormrod and Peter Dickens

Space tourism is a rapidly growing sector of capital accumulation. As virtually all space on the Earth has been humanized and populated, outer space is being made by elite…

Abstract

Space tourism is a rapidly growing sector of capital accumulation. As virtually all space on the Earth has been humanized and populated, outer space is being made by elite groups into the new exotic destination of choice. But the humanization of outer space also reinforces an ancient and powerful worldview concerning society’s relations with the cosmos. It relies on the idea that outer space is an apparently pure and serene “other” place offering a profound sense of awe, wonder, and renewed identity. This hegemonic view of the cosmos and society is a product of a new dominant social bloc, one incorporating pro-space activists, the aerospace industry, the tourism industry, and governments.

Details

Space Tourism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-495-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Nick Forster, Martin Cebis, Sol Majteles, Anurag Mathur, Roy Morgan, Janet Preuss, Vinod Tiwari and Des Wilkinson

The importance of story‐telling in organizational life has often been overlooked in contemporary organizational and leadership literature. Throughout history, leaders …

Abstract

The importance of story‐telling in organizational life has often been overlooked in contemporary organizational and leadership literature. Throughout history, leaders ‐ political and religious ‐ have used story‐telling as a powerful motivational tool, particularly during times of uncertainty, change and upheaval or in response to crises. This article looks at the role of story‐telling as an integral part of the human experience and at its applications in modern organizational life. The article concludes by suggesting that the art of story‐telling is still, despite recent advances in communication technologies, an essential managerial skill ‐ particularly for leaders of organizations.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Book part
Publication date: 17 July 2014

David Crowther

It is generally considered that the old myths were a way of explaining the origins of the world and of humanity. They also played a vital role in uniting a society. Indeed…

Abstract

Purpose

It is generally considered that the old myths were a way of explaining the origins of the world and of humanity. They also played a vital role in uniting a society. Indeed the idea of the epic story is one which permeates history to such an extent that it can be considered to be omnipresent.

Design/methodology/approach

It is argued that this cohesive role remains crucial today and so myths remain relevant to us today. The design of the chapter is to show this relevance in business behaviour. This is explored through a consideration of corporate reporting.

Findings

It is demonstrated that these myths continue to be reinvented in modern form. For individuals these myths provide a source of strength and a sense of roots and values; they offer a mirror to reveal the source of our anxieties and the means by which they might be resolved.

Research limitations/implications

In this chapter therefore the modern myths of the hero are explored in the context of managerial behaviour in organisations. In order to explore this there is a need first to consider the psychoanalysis of managerial behaviour before considering the mythic dimension of such reporting.

Practical and social implications

This paper demonstrates that organisational stories have a vitally important role in organisational cohesion and development.

Originality/value

The psychoanalytic approach provides an understanding which is not available through other methodologies.

Details

Ethics, Governance and Corporate Crime: Challenges and Consequences
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-674-3

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