Search results

1 – 10 of over 6000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2001

Yaniv Poria, David Airey and Richard Butler

Observing visitors' behaviour in places presenting heritage and reviewing the tourism literature dealing with ‘heritagetourism led to this research that is aimed at…

Downloads
3047

Abstract

Observing visitors' behaviour in places presenting heritage and reviewing the tourism literature dealing with ‘heritagetourism led to this research that is aimed at clarifying the core of heritage tourism. The common approach that heritage tourism consists of tourists in heritage places, is challenged. The relationship between four groups of variables (the tourists' personal characteristics, the tourists' awareness of the history of the site, the tourists' perception of a site in relation to their own heritage and, the site attributes) and the tourists' visitation patterns (before a visit, during a visit, and after a visit) as the outcome variables was investigated. The actual study was conducted in Israel because of its attributes as a space containing a variety of heritage sites in a relatively small area, which relate to different tourists on different grounds. The research looked in detail at two sites: the Wailing Wall and Massada. The results (specifically the tourists' perception of the sites) indicate that the relationship between the tourists and the heritage site attributes is at the core of the phenomenon of heritage tourism. The understanding of this relationship has value for the study of heritage‐related behaviour including heritage tourism. The study suggests a new approach to understanding heritage tourism which could be applicable for other subgroups of tourism, and could have implications for the management of heritage and historic sites.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 56 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 June 2020

Laurentina Vareiro, Bruno Barbosa Sousa and Sónia Sousa Silva

This study reflects on heritage, culture and museums as vectors of the tourist development of a destination. Considering the challenges inherent in the efficient…

Abstract

Purpose

This study reflects on heritage, culture and museums as vectors of the tourist development of a destination. Considering the challenges inherent in the efficient correlation of these three areas, this study intends to demonstrate the clear benefits resulting from knowledge sharing and effective cooperation.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the objectives outlined, the authors conducted a survey of the visitors of the Costume Museum, which was chosen for being one of the unmistakable icons identifying the cultural heritage of Viana do Castelo (Portugal).

Findings

In an increasingly competitive tourist market, with demand resulting from growing specialization, the integration of museological spaces as patrimonial and cultural elements in the supply of tourist destinations is an important factor in differentiation and development.

Research limitations/implications

To enhance the importance of the Costume Museum in the process of the tourist development of the city, it is fundamental to define a clear strategy for attracting and responding to the greatest demand from cultural tourists who are increasingly interested in actively participating in learning experiences. It is believed that a larger sample could strengthen the conclusions, eventually more relevant and closer to the reality.

Practical implications

The results show that visitors to the Costume Museum very positively evaluated the museum with regard to several factors covered in this study. However, there is a great dependence on school visits. On the other hand, lower qualitative evaluations were made by older age groups and those with higher academic degrees, although the evaluations remain positive.

Social implications

The paper presents museums as a possible factor in tourism development and social inclusion, advancing practical measures aimed at social justice through a fairer distribution of tourism revenues and the defence of historic centre residents' way, and quality, of life.

Originality/value

This paper examines the importance of the Costume Museum in the tourist development of Viana do Castelo (Portugal). This study reflects on heritage, culture and museums as vectors of the tourist development of a destination. Particular attention is given to visitors' motivations for visiting and their opinions about the quality of service, satisfaction and loyalty regarding this museum.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Geoffrey Wall and Ning Ryan Zhao

The purpose of this paper is to describe and evaluate red tourism in China and, in doing so, shed light on the complex relationships between tourism, heritage and identity…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe and evaluate red tourism in China and, in doing so, shed light on the complex relationships between tourism, heritage and identity politics.

Design/methodology/approach

Mixed methods – literature review, document analysis, interviews with government officials, travel agents and tourists.

Findings

Red tourism is an initiative to preserve, promote and pass down China’s communist past that is underpinned by political purposes. It has resulted in an imbalance between the government’s designation of communist heritage sites all over the country and the concentration of visitors in a small number of popular destinations. Red tourism fosters allegiance to the Communist Party of China. At the same time, it is expected to bring economic opportunities to remote locations through tourism spending and the branding opportunities that it provides. However, a different emphasis can be discerned at the national and local levels, whereby the former emphasizes political cohesion and the latter stresses local economic development.

Research limitations/implications

Four sites are investigated in detail out of the hundreds that might have been explored.

Practical implications

Recommendations are made to: diversify the product, increase stakeholder involvement, enhance heritage conservation plans, improve interpretation.

Social implications

Many implications for relationships between governments at all levels and the Chinese population. Also implications for the economic well-being of places and people adjacent to red tourism sites.

Originality/value

One of very few papers in either English or Chinese that addresses the red tourism policy in detail and with substantial empirical materials.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 November 2019

Walter Jamieson and Michelle Jamieson

Urban heritage areas are under significant pressure as a result of increasing populations and significant visitor growth. The growth in visitor numbers is of particular…

Abstract

Purpose

Urban heritage areas are under significant pressure as a result of increasing populations and significant visitor growth. The growth in visitor numbers is of particular concern as this is leading to the phenomenon of overtourism. In Asia, although the issue of overtourism requires immediate attention in order to avoid the loss of tangible and intangible heritage, many of those responsible for managing urban heritage areas lack the skills and competencies to prevent it or mitigate its effects. The purpose of this paper is to present an exploratory competency framework for managing urban heritage areas sustainably, for thereby preventing and/or mitigating overtourism.

Design/methodology/approach

In developing this framework, the authors examined how the context needs to change in order to implement sustainable urban heritage management, and they identified the particular competencies and associated skills and knowledge that are required of the stakeholders responsible for urban heritage areas to manage, prevent and/or mitigate overtourism. This analysis was based on a series of case studies examining the planning and management of urban heritage areas in Asia.

Findings

It was found that meeting three key objectives was essential in improving the competencies of stakeholder heritage area planners and developers as it relates to overtourism: integrated team approach, a mindset change on the part of key stakeholders and a common vision guiding the development process.

Research limitations/implications

It was found that in order for urban heritage managers to sustainably manage the heritage under their responsibility and prevent and/or mitigate overtourism, a fundamental shift in mindset is required on the part of key stakeholders, moving away from a “silo” approach and towards an integrated approach to urban heritage management, in which the team leaders and management teams have an interdisciplinary set of competencies and are supported in the planning and management process by subject/discipline specialists. The authors found that the set of competencies that are required by heritage management teams lie at the intersection of the four key areas of policy and planning intervention in urban heritage areas, which are: community economic development, urban planning and design, urban heritage area planning, and tourism planning and management. The competencies can be categorized under three headings: interdisciplinary perspective, soft management competencies and technical competencies.

Originality/value

This paper was developed based on the authors’ experience in planning and tourism initiatives throughout Asia and on a long history of urban heritage tourism and planning work around the world. Most of the discussion focusses on how urban destinations can prevent and/or address the issues associated with overtourism by enhancing the competencies of the teams and practitioners who are responsible for managing urban heritage areas.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2002

Sharon Barbour and Andrew Turnbull

This paper examines the integration of entrepreneurial thinking and the elements of marketing strategy in attracting visitors to Grampian region’s castles, focusing…

Abstract

This paper examines the integration of entrepreneurial thinking and the elements of marketing strategy in attracting visitors to Grampian region’s castles, focusing specifically on the current tourist initiative of the “Castle Trail”. Firstly, the nature of a heritage tourism resource is highlighted. Secondly, the role of entrepreneurship in not for profit organisations is considered. Lastly, the paper explores the need to include entrepreneurial activities in the development of a marketing plan for maximising the potential of the north‐east’s heritage tourism resources. It is demonstrated that this approach will allow for the creation of a fundamentally distinctive image that will contribute to the overall success of the initiative. The central hypothesis is that the marketing of Grampian region’s prime heritage asset is at present inadequate and new initiatives are required to link marketing principles with entrepreneurial practice. This is supported by primary research findings, where it is demonstrated that a rethinking of the current strategy is much needed. The primary research consists of both interviews and questionnaires. The findings of this research are then combined with the findings of the secondary research, the literature review, and together they provide the framework for a number of recommendations. These include the need to improve road signposting, to extend opening times, and make greater use of sales promotion. A more creative approach can also allow for greater exploitation of new opportunities, particularly in the context of the augmented product. The final conclusion is that there is significant public interest and support for promoting the region’s castles as a major tourist asset, but that at present the potential to promote the region is being clearly under utilised.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Sharif Shams Imon

This paper aims to bridge the epistemological gap between heritage and tourism in understanding (and describing) the link between what is protected in heritage and what is…

Downloads
1773

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to bridge the epistemological gap between heritage and tourism in understanding (and describing) the link between what is protected in heritage and what is a sustainable use of heritage as a tourism resource. This is accomplished by focusing on the socio-cultural dimension of heritage.

Design/methodology/approach

Three case studies involving UNESCO World Heritage sites and representing different stages of tourism development from three different developing economies are discussed. The case studies are based on the author’s extensive monitoring and evaluation of World Heritage Site management over the course of a decade, including tourism management, and they feature in-depth discussions with government heritage authorities and with heritage and tourism experts and stakeholders; observation and monitoring activities; and review of policy and project documents, heritage and tourism plans, UNESCO and other professional bodies’ reports and academic research works.

Findings

A symbiotic relationship between the environment, people and economy and the multi-sectoral nature of the tourism industry makes achieving sustainable development goals almost impossible unless there is a coordinated and integrated approach by the all parties involved, especially in culturally and naturally sensitive areas. The spirit of place is used as a conceptual framework in the application of systems. Theories seem to be the way forward for a sustainable management of tourism in such areas.

Originality/value

The paper addresses an important and under-researched aspect of tourism-heritage encounters: How the socio-cultural impacts of tourism affect the value of cultural heritage, especially in the context of developing economies.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 June 2010

Anna Leask and Ivana Rihova

This paper aims to determine the role of heritage tourism in Shetland Island destination development and how this links to tourism public policy in island communities.

Downloads
2472

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine the role of heritage tourism in Shetland Island destination development and how this links to tourism public policy in island communities.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is conducted in the Shetland Islands, located off the north coast of Scotland, UK. Descriptive and inductive approaches are utilized to enable the researchers to recognize multiple social structures and draw conclusions from observations and specific information. Primary research focuses on semi‐structured interviews with key informants. Data is analyzed via a mix of content analysis and interpretation of the responses through a connected narrative approach.

Findings

Seasonality is a key feature of Shetland Island tourism, alongside other key limitations to growth including transport links and climatic conditions. Potential conflicts exist between tourism stakeholders and their perceptions of the effectiveness of the heritage tourism public policy in Shetland, though overall stakeholder collaboration succeeds in enhancing heritage conservation and development.

Practical implications

While the findings relate specifically to the Shetland Islands, the general conclusions offer an example of best practice concerning tourism public policy for heritage‐focused tourism in island communities, which could be used in comparable destinations.

Originality/value

The choice of the Shetland Islands as an example of a cold water island destination offers the opportunity to extend existing research and examine how the community of Shetland embraces the opportunities afforded by tourism as an alternative to traditional industries.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 February 2019

Christina Geng-qing Chi, Chaozhi Zhang and Yuanyuan Liu

This study aims to examine how tourism impacts on local community, managers’ attachment to the community and their identification with the value of heritage resources…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how tourism impacts on local community, managers’ attachment to the community and their identification with the value of heritage resources influence managers’ corporate social responsibility (CSR) attitudes, utilizing the value identification and agency theories.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed hypotheses were tested utilizing cross-sectional data collected from 228 managers of a plethora of travel and tourism companies that operate at a UNESCO World Heritage site in China. A structured questionnaire was administered in person in managers’ offices by a team of trained research assistants. A total of 202 valid surveys were included in the data analysis. A two-step structural equation modeling (SEM) approach was used to first examine the psychometric properties of the measurement model, and then test the causal relationships proposed in the structural model.

Findings

The findings indicate that managers’ place attachment, their heritage value identification and their perceptions of positive tourism impacts affect their CSR attitudes. However, the negative effects of tourism do not significantly influence CSR attitudes. Data collected through open-ended questions incorporated in the structured survey have provided justification for the insignificant relationship.

Originality/value

CSR perceptions of managers, especially those at heritage sites, have not received much attention from tourism scholars. Because travel and tourism companies at heritage sites are integral in the preservation and conservation of heritage sites while managers of those companies are the ones who initiate and implement socially responsible policies and practices, it is important to understand the factors that may influence those managers’ CSR attitudes and behaviors.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 20 August 2021

Justice Mensah, Benjamin Yaw Tachie and Harriet M.D. Potakey

The sixth of the global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) has access to improved sanitation as one of its targets. Sanitation is important not only for environmental…

Abstract

Purpose

The sixth of the global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) has access to improved sanitation as one of its targets. Sanitation is important not only for environmental quality and public health but also for the outstanding universal value (OUV) of heritage monument sites and tourism promotion. The study examined the causes of open defecation (OD) in the neighbourhood of a World Heritage (WH) site in Ghana and the implications of the practice for sustainable tourism and heritage management.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used the qualitative approach. Data were gathered from purposively targeted respondents (an Environmental Health Officer, Heritage Managers, a Tourism Expert, Hoteliers, Zoomlion Staff, Open Defecators, Community Opinion Leaders and Ordinary Community Residents) and analysed using the thematic approach.

Findings

It became evident that the causes of OD were: the lack of toilet facilities in many houses in the community, filthy and foul-smelling public latrines, poor attitude and heritage culture, mental and income poverty, inadequate sensitisation and a poor law enforcement regime. OD threatened the sustainability of heritage tourism and its associated livelihoods, as well as public health. In addition, it impaired the authenticity and integrity of the heritage monument, culminating in a detraction from the OUV of the heritage property.

Practical implications

In collaboration with the local, national and international stakeholders, the managers of the heritage monument should design and implement a comprehensive environmentally friendly plan. The plan should consider demarcating the boundaries of the heritage asset, monitoring the protected area, enforcing sanitation laws and mounting intensive sanitation education campaigns. It should also consider providing a decent toilet in the vicinity of the monument for the transit population, facilitate the provision of a toilet in every house through the community-led total sanitation approach, installing digital cameras at vantage points in the buffer zone of the castle to capture open defecators and punishing offenders severely to deter others from engaging in the ignoble practice of OD.

Originality/value

The authors argue that sanitation at heritage sites in developing countries merits further discussion within the WH network to promote sustainable heritage conservation management and tourism.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 6 September 2019

Minoo H. Esfehani

Cultural heritage carries two sets of tangible and intangible assets. The relationship between tourism and intangible cultural heritage is a young but growing discourse…

Abstract

Cultural heritage carries two sets of tangible and intangible assets. The relationship between tourism and intangible cultural heritage is a young but growing discourse. However, tourism planning and strategy development for intangible cultural heritage have so far remained undervalued. This gap looks much bigger within the Persian context. The aim of this chapter is to explore how the roles of Persian intangible cultural heritage in tourism are perceived, and whether the intended roles can be promoted as practicable tourism strategies. Data analysis suggests intangible cultural heritage as a tool that contributes positively to developing tourism strategies through promoting destination attraction and marketing opportunities and sustainability in tourism.

Details

Experiencing Persian Heritage
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-813-8

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 6000