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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2012

Ali A. Alraouf

The paper discusses current trends and future developments in the study of people-urban environment relations, with an emphasis on the concept of diversity within the Gulf…

Abstract

The paper discusses current trends and future developments in the study of people-urban environment relations, with an emphasis on the concept of diversity within the Gulf cities. This is explored in relation to: theoretical approaches, urban public spaces, people's lifestyles, social groups and inclusive urban environments. Contemporary Gulf cities are providing unique examples for research on urban diversity. Its demographic structure is distinctive for a minimum of 50% expatriates in overall population. Gulf cities are obliged to cope with such a compelling fact. The challenge is to move away from indifference and bring about better acceptance of others. On the relationship; city spaces and culture, the paper argues that traditional markets must be envisioned as spaces for cultural expressions. Traditional markets are a rich display of products and talents and a great opportunity to share and meet with people from same culture and others. Using comparative analysis approach juxtapositioning the selected cases, the paper confronts questions like what does Gulf urban diversity mean in the present. In addition, is diversity in urban spaces only a challenge to be dealt with or is there also economic potential that can be taken advantage of? How do we ensure that Gulf cities are indeed spaces of tolerance? How to give visibility to the spaces of marginalized groups, as these spaces are often ignored or worse, eliminated? How to preserve or regain spaces in the city for the expression of traditional cultures of those migrating from other regions or countries? The paper explores the socioeconomic and cultural mechanisms that can encourage inclusive pluralism in the Gulf cities' open spaces.

Details

Open House International, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 26 March 2010

Marcus L. Stephenson, Karl A. Russell and David Edgar

The purpose of this paper is to examine the challenges faced by the hospitality industries in developing an Islamic hospitality identity and indigenous styles of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the challenges faced by the hospitality industries in developing an Islamic hospitality identity and indigenous styles of management, particularly in the context of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) – especially Dubai. It also aims to identify and comprehend the socio‐cultural implications of Islamic hospitality in terms of products and marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual‐based paper critically reviews and amalgamates a diverse range of literature concerning Islamic hospitality (and tourism), Arab management and leadership qualities, human capital and nationalization of employment, industry skills and educational directives in hospitality and destination and product strategies.

Findings

The work critically accounts for the changing nature of skills needed by localised hospitality managers and the industry in general, especially to keep pace with dynamic customer demands and an increasingly sophisticated market and consumer. The outcome of the paper concerns the operationalisation of soft skills and managerial expertise attuned to ethnic and religious attributes of the host society. The evaluations propose ways in which the education sector can extend the career development and progression pathways for UAE nationals. The work also indicates how product development, innovation, transformation and marketing have a crucial role to play in advancing an Islamic and cultural approach to hospitality.

Originality/value

This paper uniquely concerns an under‐developed area of academic study: the role Islamic‐based principles and practices of hospitality and ways in which they can be developed through an indigenous‐led workforce, and Islamic and Arab styles of management, leadership and service sector operation.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

Remah Y. Gharib

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of built heritage preservation from an Islamic perspective. This study will dig out the jurisprudential principles to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of built heritage preservation from an Islamic perspective. This study will dig out the jurisprudential principles to challenge contemporary destruction of built heritage in the Muslim contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

The research challenges the radicals’ opinion by revealing their evidence to destroy the various built heritage. In fact, it confronts these acts and assists the international community to understand the basic values of Islam toward the environment and built heritage specifically. This exploratory research will follow this lead and seek the objective, first, by investigating the concept of succession and the urbanization of Earth by mankind. Reassuringly, the research introduces few verses from the Holy Qur’an to support the various arguments presented and provide a qualitative understanding of the interpretations. Moreover, few speeches of the Prophet (PBUH) are added to ease synthesizing the understanding of specific principles related to the Islamic law (Shari’ah). This study provides an in-depth understanding toward the legitimacy of the act of preservation under the umbrella of the intents and objectives of the Islamic law.

Findings

This study confirms that preservation of the built heritage is legitimate from the Islamic law perspective; this is due to the fact that Islam mandates mankind to utilize wisely the resources available to shape a proper physical and economic environment. The preservation of the built heritage returns with benefit to the major society and assures that resources are recycled to serve humanity for longer generations.

Research limitations/implications

This research promotes the concepts of good/benefit and avoiding harm to support the crux of built heritage preservation from an Islamic perspective. In quest of this notion, various scholars’ work throughout the Islamic civilization has been revealed to draw some shed on the rooted arguments to highlight various concepts of Islam toward preservation.

Originality/value

This paper fulfills an identified need to prove that Islam is against the destruction of built heritage and historic monuments and against all acts of violence and terrorism.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Article
Publication date: 28 July 2021

Zafeirenia Brokalaki and Georgios Patsiaouras

The purpose of this paper is to show and critically discuss the motivations, conflicting narratives, practices and effects around the marketisation of cultural heritage

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show and critically discuss the motivations, conflicting narratives, practices and effects around the marketisation of cultural heritage. The work focusses on the exemplar case study of the ancient temple of the Athenian Parthenon, as a proto-brand, to explore ancient, medieval and modern marketing forces and practices through which various stakeholders have promoted, gifted, commercially traded, exchanged, acquired and illegally removed national cultural artefacts and historical monuments.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on a structured historical periodisation that covers three main eras – classical age, late antiquity and modern period – that triggered the marketisation of the ancient temple in diverse ways. First, historical research was conducted through the use of a range of secondary sources and archives. Second, observation techniques were used to study heritage marketisation practices at the New Acropolis Museum and the Parthenon in Athens and the British Museum in London. Third, visual material further facilitated the analysis.

Findings

This paper identifies multifarious institutional forces, political interests, technologies and sociocultural events that shape the commodification of history and marketisation of heritage offering a broader discussion on the evolution of early marketing practices and brands used to promote particular values, cultures and places, as well as the emergence and growth of illicit arts and antiquities markets.

Originality/value

Considering the lack of marketing research on the commercialisation of heritage, the work discloses novel insights around the use of cultural proto-brands and the formation of illegal markets and questionable arts trade practices. It, therefore, questions the ethical, socio-political, economic and aesthetic implications of the extensive marketisation of history and raises issues around the legitimate ownership, promotion and consumption of heritage.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1990

Arunoday Sana

It is a common observation that new technology introduced into Third World countries frequently fails to yield the expected results. Despite the availability of adequate…

Abstract

It is a common observation that new technology introduced into Third World countries frequently fails to yield the expected results. Despite the availability of adequate finance, willing donor and recipient organisations and a congenial political climate, the imported equipment is often under‐utilised, used less productively and, at the end of its useful life, the users may look forward to a fresh induction, indicating thereby that the technology provided has not been absorbed.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 10 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1982

Jean Séguy

In this paper an analysis is offered of the history and, more briefly, present situation, of an Anabaptist movement as it manifested itself in the form of the French…

Abstract

In this paper an analysis is offered of the history and, more briefly, present situation, of an Anabaptist movement as it manifested itself in the form of the French Anabaptist Mennonite Assemblies. The paper is divided into a consideration of political, legal, economic and social aspects of French Mennonitism on the one hand, and of religious and ethical aspects on the other.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1995

Masudul Alam Choudhury

Undertakes a critical review of the book, Muslims in Europe, to bring out the localized analysis of Islam and Muslims incontemporary Europe which is given in much of the…

Abstract

Undertakes a critical review of the book, Muslims in Europe , to bring out the localized analysis of Islam and Muslims in contemporary Europe which is given in much of the occidentalist literature. Shows that such a localized view does not represent the true character of the global Islamic revivalism in the post‐Cold War period, in which the phenomenon of Muslims in Europe is to be examined. Examines the alternative view of this global approach to the study of Muslims in Europe. In this context the alternative assumes the presentation of an Islamic sub‐nation model and its grass‐roots world view. Shows that the model is a globally interactive system, based on a knowledge‐centred universality. In the light of this, examines Islamic future in Europe and its relationship with dominant European governments.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2020

Marwa M. El-Ashmouni and Ashraf M. Salama

The purpose of this paper is to develop an analytical account on the contemporary architecture of Cairo with emphasis on the past three decades, from the early 1990s to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an analytical account on the contemporary architecture of Cairo with emphasis on the past three decades, from the early 1990s to the present. The paper critically analyses narratives of the plurality of “isms”, within architectural vocabulary and discourse, that resulted from the contextual particularities that shaped it.

Design/methodology/approach

Three lines of inquiry are envisioned as overarching aspects of architecture: the chronological, the interventional and the representational. These discussions are underpinned by the discourse of decolonialisation and cosmopolitanism, posited sequentially by Frantz Fanon in The Wretched of the Earth (1961), and Ulrich Beck in The Cosmopolitan Vision (2004). The analysis expands to interrogate these two notions as prelude for reflecting on representations of selected projects: The Smart Village (2001); the Great Egyptian Museum (2002), Al-Azhar Park (2005), American University in Cairo New Campus (2008/2009), and the New Administrative Capital (2018).

Findings

The investigation on the interventional and the representational levels via aspects of discursivity and contradictions highlights that decolonisation and cosmopolitanism are two inseparable facets in the architectural practice in Egypt’s 21st century. These indivisible notions are based on idiosyncratic core to human experience, which emerged from concurrent overturning historical and secular everyday life striving to suppress ideological supremacy.

Research limitations/implications

Further detailed examples can be developed to offer discerning elucidations relevant to both notions of cosmopolitanism and decolonialisation.

Originality/value

The paper offers novel theoretical analysis of Cairo’s most recent architecture. The reflection on the notions of decolonialisation and cosmopolitanism is a timely example of the complex cultural encounters that have shaped the Egyptian architecture, given the recent interventions by the “Modern State” that legitimised such notions.

Details

Open House International, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2004

David Matheson

Hardly surprisingly, like many fellow Glaswegians, I grew up believing that the language of the majority of my fellow citizens was slang1 and hence to be disparaged…

Abstract

Hardly surprisingly, like many fellow Glaswegians, I grew up believing that the language of the majority of my fellow citizens was slang1 and hence to be disparaged, if not altogether despised. The fact that we were all equally able to express ourselves in Glaswegian or varying degrees of “Standard” English was conveniently overlooked. The hegemonical dominance of the “Standard” was total. Our native tongue was to be extirpated as rapidly as possible if we wanted any social advancement at all and in working class Glasgow in the 1960s and 1970s social advancement was a major item on many a personal agenda. The multilingualism now so much à la mode was never an issue. Implicitly we were indoctrinated with notions of transient bilingualism whose goal, like that of the 19th and 20th century social missionaries in the Celtic areas of Scotland (and elsewhere), was to teach us the English in order that we forget the Glaswegian.

Details

Suffer The Little Children
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-831-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1981

Bryan S. Turner

It is now fashionable to suggest that the Celtic regions of the United Kingdom are the internal colonies of the central English state and that they have been, particularly…

Abstract

It is now fashionable to suggest that the Celtic regions of the United Kingdom are the internal colonies of the central English state and that they have been, particularly since the rapid industrialization of the nineteenth century, subject to a penetrating anglicization of their culture and institutions. In terms of the internal colonialism thesis, it can be argued that the cultural nationalism of Scotland which was developed in the nineteenth century was an attempt to maintain the distinctiveness of civil society in Scotland in the context of massive regional economic imbalance. The Scottish intelligentsia, dominated by Edinburgh lawyers and Presbyterian ministers, can thus be compared with the intelligentsia of Third World societies undergoing a process of de‐colonization where separate cultural identities have to be preserved or, if necessary, constructed.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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