Search results

1 – 10 of over 2000
Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Abstract

Details

Property Management, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Abstract

Details

Facilities, vol. 17 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Abstract

Details

Structural Survey, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2003

Rachel Kovacs

This study compares the strategies and impact of six British activist groups, as documented in 1997, with data gathered on the same groups in 2000. These groups, Voice of…

Abstract

This study compares the strategies and impact of six British activist groups, as documented in 1997, with data gathered on the same groups in 2000. These groups, Voice of the Listener and Viewer, Campaign for Quality Television, Deaf Broadcasting Council, Consumers Association, National Consumers Council and National Listeners and Viewers Association, attempted to build a public sphere for generating debate around and catalysing changes to broadcasting policies and programming. They were tracked in 2000 in order to identify those issues, relationships and groups that had endured. The research design provided a telescopic look at their interactions with their targets and with each other during a period of rapid technological and industry change. In a multichannel broadcasting environment where convergence and globalisation are buzzwords, activists used public relations to create a broader public forum for a wide range of significant issues with which to engage demographically, psychographically and geographically diverse publics. The ensuing media education, media advocacy and relationship building, although elite in origins, strengthened democratic discourse, thus reaffirming broadcasting’s invaluable role in civil society.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 December 2004

Nigel O’Connor and Toni Muzi Falconi

This paper brings together new and existing resource material to provide a detailed profile of the regulatory environments affecting the practice of public relations in…

Abstract

This paper brings together new and existing resource material to provide a detailed profile of the regulatory environments affecting the practice of public relations in the UK, Italy and South Africa. It is hoped that by contextualising the social, political and economic factors specific to each country, readers will be more acutely aware of similarities and differences between PR practices in each country. This approach aims to help drive PR policy development by providing a useful template for further national and continental PR regulatory environment mapping.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 December 2004

Barbara DeSanto and Danny Moss

This paper explores the nature of managerial work in the public relations context drawing comparisons with the way mainstream management research has defined the main…

Abstract

This paper explores the nature of managerial work in the public relations context drawing comparisons with the way mainstream management research has defined the main elements and processes of management within organisations. The paper begins with a critical review of the public relations and management literatures relating to managerial work and behaviour, highlighting the distinctively different approaches taken by public relations and management scholars in defining the nature of managerial work and behaviour. The paper goes on to present the findings of a qualitative investigation into the role and work patterns of practitioners occupying senior positions in cross sections of both US and UK organisations. The study identifies a number of common elements in pattern of “managerial” work performed by both UK and US‐based practitioners. The study also reveals the extent to which senior practitioners participate as members of the dominant coalition within their organisations and contribute to strategic decision making. The paper concludes by reflecting on the adequacy of existing definitions and understanding of the managerial dimension of the role played by practitioners within organisations.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

David Phillips

This paper shows how new technologies open up significant research and development opportunities for the PR industry. It reviews public relations evaluation methodologies…

Abstract

This paper shows how new technologies open up significant research and development opportunities for the PR industry. It reviews public relations evaluation methodologies that can progress from evaluating media coverage of small numbers of “messages” to the development of systems for analysis of both objective and subjective texts. Applications include internal, external, research and media content. The paper looks to the next generation of analysis using International Standards Organisation (SGML) and web‐based technologies such as NewsML and XTM (both XML derivatives) in the processes of content and analysis, particularly as it can be applied to themes and topic analysis. The paper makes public for the first time the concept of corporate superthemes.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Yi‐Ru Regina Chen

China’s open‐market reform and rapid economic growth have generated a tremendous surge in activity and market investment by multinational corporations (MNCs). By 2000, 400…

Abstract

China’s open‐market reform and rapid economic growth have generated a tremendous surge in activity and market investment by multinational corporations (MNCs). By 2000, 400 of the 500 most famous MNCs had invested in China. One distinctive feature of China’ s business environment, its authoritarian political system, requires MNCs to practise strategic public affairs to interact constantly with the different levels of Chinese government, respond to the policies and further influence business policy formation. This paper proposes a conceptual model of MNC‐government bargaining that is composed of international political economy, dependency theory and agency theory. It then examines (1) the international and domestic influences on MNC‐government bargaining in China and (2) the strategies MNCs employed to influence Chinese laws for foreign business in their interests. A case study of the Chinese ban on direct selling operations in 1998 and Amway’s strategies to remove the ban is presented. Results suggest that effective public affairs should engage in the following activities: (1) issues management, (2) constantly and systematically analysing the MNC’s bargaining power with the host government, (3) selecting public affairs strategies based on the analysis of MNC‐government bargaining, (4) exercising relationship management, and (5) being ethical in its practice.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Andy Popp, Ji‐young Ea Ruckman and Helen Debra Rowe

Clothing supply chains are subject to increasing global dispersal. Though primarily cost driven, this process impacts on the full range of business functions and…

Abstract

Clothing supply chains are subject to increasing global dispersal. Though primarily cost driven, this process impacts on the full range of business functions and activities. However, many dimensions of that impact have as yet received little investigation. The research described in this paper examines the impact of international sourcing strategies on the quality control or assurance function in the clothing industry. The paper establishes a theoretical framework within which observed changes in this area may be analysed. This framework focuses in particular on information costs and flows. The paper reports some preliminary empirical findings derived from a series of semi‐structured interviews conducted with representatives of UK firms deploying international sourcing strategies. A number of supply‐chain case studies are modelled using a diagrammatic methodology which allows the determinants of their configuration, performance and evolution to be explored. The paper concludes by describing the next stage to be undertaken in this research project.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Alison Beazley

A survey of 100 young women's body measurements was undertaken during 1992/93. The findings are the basis of Part 3, which aims to explain how size charts are developed…

Abstract

A survey of 100 young women's body measurements was undertaken during 1992/93. The findings are the basis of Part 3, which aims to explain how size charts are developed for garments; to evaluate the measuring equipment used and to compare the size chart body measurements with those proportionally derived by traditional formulae. A size chart is the artificial dividing of a range of measurements which are concise and consistent. There are different types of size charts. Some are of body measurement for specific proportion and shape. Others are for garments including ease allowances which vary according to the garment style and type of fabric. Size charts can be developed in three stages commencing with the raw survey data, which is then rounded to the nearest 1.0 cm or 0.5 cm and finally ease allowance is added for the finished garment. During the survey some measurements were repeated using different measuring equipment so that a comparison could be made to select the most suitable for pattern construction. The use of the anthropometer is limited as it can only take linear measurements. However, it is helpful when analysing body proportion, whereas the tape measures attached to the harness and a metal tape measure can record the contour surface of the body, which is more appropriate for clothing. The adjustable square and angle were a little difficult to position correctly but were useful to check the formulae used for pattern construction. A comparison is made between the survey body measurements and traditional formula to derive body measurements which are difficult to take. The dividing of the height by eight heads is useful for length proportions. The derived neck shape and survey measurements were comparable. Head measurements suitable for hoods were similar for all bust and neck sizes. Only the height showed any progression in size. This concludes the three articles which explain the taking of body measurements, methods of analysing the data and applying it to clothing pattern construction. It is hoped that this will aid those in industry and education who wish to undertake research and to develop new technology.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 2000