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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

Craig L. Pearce, Henry P. Sims, Jonathan F. Cox, Gail Ball, Eugene Schnell, Ken A. Smith and Linda Trevino

Extends the transactional‐transformational model of leadership by deductively developing four theoretical behavioral types of leadership based on a historical analysis of…

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10189

Abstract

Extends the transactional‐transformational model of leadership by deductively developing four theoretical behavioral types of leadership based on a historical analysis of leadership literature. Then, in an exploratory empirical phase, uses two data sets to inductively develop alternative models of leadership types. Finally, with a third data set, tests several theoretically plausible typologies using second‐order confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The results of the CFA generally support the existence of four leadership types: directive leadership, transactional leadership, transformational leadership, and empowering leadership.

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Journal of Management Development, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This…

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13785

Abstract

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies — and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

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Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Seokhwa Yun, Jonathan Cox and Henry P. Sims

Seeks to examine the interaction effect of leadership and follower characteristics on follower self‐leadership, using hierarchical linear modeling.

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13436

Abstract

Purpose

Seeks to examine the interaction effect of leadership and follower characteristics on follower self‐leadership, using hierarchical linear modeling.

Design/methodology/approach

Longitudinal data were collected using a questionnaire at two points in time, with ten weeks between each collection. These data facilitate the causal inference between leadership and follower need for autonomy (wave 1) and follower self‐leadership behaviors (wave 2). Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) was used to analyze the hierarchical structure data.

Findings

Both empowering and directive leadership (group level) interacted with follower's need for autonomy (individual level) to enhance subsequent follower self‐leadership (individual level). That is, empowering leadership had a stronger positive effect on followers who were high on the need for autonomy, and directive leadership had a stronger negative effect on followers who were high on the need for autonomy. In summary, the influence of leadership on follower self‐leadership was contingent on follower need for autonomy. Overall, the results supported the view that attributes of the follower can be an important element in contingency theories of leadership.

Research limitation/implications

This study does not include other possible individual characteristics, group level characteristics, and organizational level or environmental characteristics. A future research design might include organizational‐level characteristics.

Practical implications

Both the leadership context and the trait of the individual employee work hand in hand to produce true self‐leadership. Therefore, organizations need to develop empowering leaders who will, in turn, develop followers who are effective at self‐leadership.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the literature by testing a contingency model of leadership and follower self‐leadership. This study also demonstrated the usefulness of HLM to test interaction effects between group‐level variables and an individual‐level variable on individual‐level dependent variables.

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Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1981

Charles C. Manz and Henry P. Sims

This paper explores the ethical issues associated with using behavioral management techniques in organizations. First, criticisms of behavioral management are enumerated…

Abstract

This paper explores the ethical issues associated with using behavioral management techniques in organizations. First, criticisms of behavioral management are enumerated. Then, a response is developed for each of the criticisms. A model is proposed which recommends an open/positive system of behavioral management in order to optimize both organizational effectiveness and individual freedom and dignity. Finally, an alternative to external control, employee self‐management, is proposed and explored as a further system of managerial control.

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2008

Alan D. Boss and Henry P. Sims

The purpose of this paper is to develop a theoretical perspective on how emotion regulation and self‐leadership can help move the experience of personal failure toward recovery.

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5289

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a theoretical perspective on how emotion regulation and self‐leadership can help move the experience of personal failure toward recovery.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an integrative model, the authors discuss options that managers can take to decrease the effects of failure and move quickly into recovery.

Findings

Using the context of failure, the authors suggest that emotion regulation and self‐leadership can work together to help those who have experienced failure move toward recovery and do so more quickly and easily than those who do not engage in theses activities.

Practical implications

This paper provides helpful steps to individuals who have experienced failure, as well as to managers who may be in a position to help their employees cope with failure. The paper proposes a recovery path for times when failure occurs.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the growing literatures of both self‐leadership and emotion regulation, bringing them together to inform those who have failed with ways toward recovery. The paper proposes that emotion regulation can complement self‐leadership to enhance the process of recovery from failure. It also extends the self‐leadership literature by integrating the concept of “natural reward” into the principal areas of cognitive self‐leadership and behavioural self‐leadership.

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Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Book part
Publication date: 22 July 2005

Xiaomeng Zhang and Henry P. Sims

Based on a four-factor leadership typology, this theoretical chapter proposes four alternative models to investigate how collaborative capital moderates the relationships…

Abstract

Based on a four-factor leadership typology, this theoretical chapter proposes four alternative models to investigate how collaborative capital moderates the relationships between leadership and innovation. Beyerlein, Beyerlein, and Kennedy (2004) define collaborative capital as “how well people work together toward shared goals and outcomes.” In this chapter, we focus on empowerment as an important manifestation of collaborative capital. That is, first, empowerment enhances collaboration across vertical hierarchical lines through sharing of decision-making authority. Also, since empowerment is typically implemented as a team form of organizational structure, empowered teams enhance collaboration through the process of decentralized team decision-making. Thus, the accumulation of successful empowerment and the qualities of empowered team member represent the collaborative capital. Specifically, the models suggest that empowerment may function as a partial mediator, or as a moderator, or as both, in the basic relationship between transformational leadership and innovation. In addition, although transformational leadership and empowering leadership elicit different attitudes and behaviors of team members that may facilitate innovation, the interactions between these outcomes will maximize the effects of leadership on innovation. The implications of these observations and the possible directions for future research are discussed.

Details

Collaborative Capital: Creating Intangible Value
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-222-1

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Book part
Publication date: 2 January 2003

Seokhwa Yun, Samer Faraj, Yan Xiao and Henry P. Sims

This study investigates team leadership and coordination during a trauma resuscitation. A trauma resuscitation team is an emergency cross- functional medical team, which…

Abstract

This study investigates team leadership and coordination during a trauma resuscitation. A trauma resuscitation team is an emergency cross- functional medical team, which includes several specialists such as a surgeon, an anesthesia provider, and nurses. The main purpose of the team is to perform a resuscitation; treatment to a patient who experiences a trauma (e.g. car crash, stabbing, gunshot) and has a life-threatening injury. The trauma team can be seen as a type of crisis team since the need for treatment is quite intense and urgent. Team members must treat and stabilize the patient within minutes and without much information about his/her condition and medical history. As a result, this team is working in an intense and highly stressful situation. We used focused ethnography in order to gain an understanding of leadership and coordination during a trauma resuscitation. Over a period of six months, we observed admissions, shadowed teams, and interviewed specialists as a primary data collection method. Our findings suggest that the effectiveness of leadership differs depending on: (1) the severity level of patient condition; and (2) the level of team experience. Directive leadership is more effective when a patient is severely injured, whereas empowering leadership is more effective when a patient is not severely injured. Also, directive leadership is better when a trauma team is inexperienced, but empowering leader- ship is better when a trauma team has a high level of experience.

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Advances in Interdisciplinary Studies of Work Teams
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-981-8

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2000

Craig L. Pearce and Henry P. Sims

The fascination with leadership seems an enduring human condition. Numerous theories of leadership have been espoused over the centuries. The primary emphasis of these…

Abstract

The fascination with leadership seems an enduring human condition. Numerous theories of leadership have been espoused over the centuries. The primary emphasis of these theories has been the individual leader. The purpose of this research is to widen the debate on leadership to include, not only individual level leadership, but also to explore the possibilities of `shared leadership' at the group level of analysis and thus suggest movement toward a multi-level theory of leadership.

Details

Advances in Interdisciplinary Studies of Work Teams
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-747-0

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2008

This paper aims to review a theoretical perspective on how emotion regulation and self‐leadership can help move the experience of failure toward recovery.

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1352

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review a theoretical perspective on how emotion regulation and self‐leadership can help move the experience of failure toward recovery.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper offers conceptual ideas around how to use emotions to cope with failure in an accessible form.

Findings

The paper suggest that you should think about what you might say if asked to pinpoint the last time you failed. Yesterday when you broke your gym regime again? Back in fifth grade when you flunked your math test? This morning when you underperformed in a meeting? Every day, every year or never at all, your opinion on your own failures is telling. What exactly constitutes a failure? And, more importantly, how do you respond to it? IT may be that any sense of having failed overcomes you with guilt and shame for a considerable period of time. Perhaps you are still depressed and holding yourself back because of a failure some time ago. Or maybe you just know how to get over it and move on.

Practical implications

The paper suggests further research into new and growing areas of study, and offers action points for managers and individuals in business.

Originality/value

The paper adds to recent research in the field of emotional intelligence, and suggests how these concepts can have practical implications for the workplace.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Mahmoud Salem, Harold Lazarus and Joseph Cullen

Firms around the world are facing an ever‐increasing array ofemployee‐related problems, such as decreasing productivity, falteringquality of products, persistent…

Abstract

Firms around the world are facing an ever‐increasing array of employee‐related problems, such as decreasing productivity, faltering quality of products, persistent absenteeism, worker dissatisfaction, and high levels of turnover. Exacerbating this situation, there is a worldwide recession and explosive geopolitical developments, which have led to great uncertainties in world markets. For many organizations, the need to respond effectively to these problems is of paramount importance, as their economic viability hangs in the balance. To deal with the challenges of today′s global environment and to stay competitive in the world marketplace, organizations need to look beyond the sphere of traditional directive management and the limited application of participative management. One concept, which is showing particular promise in this regard as a comprehensive solution, is that of self‐managing teams (SMTs). Explores the essence of this concept, the unique role which it assigns to management, some of its drawbacks and benefits. Also suggests some critical requirements for successful implementation.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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