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Article

Henry Ngenyam Bang, Marcellus Forh Mbah, Humphrey Ngala Ndi and Judwin Alieh Ndzo

This paper aims to examine Cameroon’s health service resilience in the first five months (March–July 2020) of the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak. The motive is to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine Cameroon’s health service resilience in the first five months (March–July 2020) of the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak. The motive is to diagnose sub-optimal performance in sustaining health-care services during the pandemic to identify areas for improvement and draw lessons for the future.

Design/methodology/approach

This is principally qualitative, exploratory, analytical and descriptive research that involves the collation of empirical, primary and secondary data. A conceptual framework [health systems resilience for emerging infectious diseases (HSREID)] provides structure to the study and an anchor for interpreting the findings. The research validity has been established by analysing the aims/objectives from multiple perspectives in the research tradition of triangulation.

Findings

Cameroon has exerted much effort to combat the COVID-19 pandemic. Yet, several constraints and gaps exist. The findings reveal limitations in Cameroon’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic in the provision of fundamental health-care services under contextual themes of health infrastructure/medical supplies, human capital, communication/sensitisation/health education, governance and trust/confidence. Analysis of the identified impediments demonstrates that Cameroon’s health-care system is not resilient enough to cope with the COVID-19 pandemic and provides several insights for an enhanced response as the pandemic accelerates in the country.

Originality/value

This is one of the first scholarly articles to examine how Cameroon’s health-care system is faring in COVID-19 combat. Underscored by the novel HSREID model, this study provides initial insights into Cameroon’s resilience to COVID-19 with a view to enhancing the health system’s response as the pandemic unfolds and strengthens readiness for subsequent health crises.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Keywords

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Article

Henry Ngenyam Bang

The purpose of this paper is to review critically, how the Lake Nyos disaster (LND), which occurred in 1986, is being managed by examining the immediate post disaster…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review critically, how the Lake Nyos disaster (LND), which occurred in 1986, is being managed by examining the immediate post disaster management and long‐term management. It reveals how the disaster management system in Cameroon influences the management style and process with regards to the technical and socio‐economic management of LND.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative research methods for empirical and secondary data were adopted in the study, including interviews (with disaster managers and LND survivors) and reviews of policy documents and media reports. Triangulation of information sources in the analysis has been done to enhance credibility.

Findings

While significant progress has been made in technical management of LND, the socio‐economic management has been poor. Although this can be partly attributed to the weak financial situation of Cameroon, the major problems seem to be related to human systems.

Practical implications

The disaster management has focused mainly on technical and structural mitigation measures with less consideration of non‐structural measures. This has had dire consequences for the displaced disaster survivors. A major challenge still lies in tackling social vulnerability within the displaced disaster population.

Originality/value

This paper provides a comprehensive analysis of contemporary challenges facing the management of LND. This paper is important because published information on socio‐economic aspects of LND is very scarce. This paper is part of a larger research that was conducted for a PhD in the UK.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

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