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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Henrik Holt Larsen and Chris Brewster

The notion of line management accepting greater responsibility for human resource management (HRM) within employing organisations is now received wisdom. This paper…

Abstract

The notion of line management accepting greater responsibility for human resource management (HRM) within employing organisations is now received wisdom. This paper presents data on the variation in practice across Europe, noting the evidence that the HR role is increasingly assigned to line managers, and that the extent of such assignment varies from country to country. This first presentation of data from 1999/2000 updates previous work the authors have presented on this topic: the evidence shows that in terms of that assignment, countries tend to remain in the same relationship to each other.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Ariane Hegewisch and Henrik Holt Larsen

Drawing on Price Waterhouse Cranfield survey data, examines whether the common challenges to local authorities in Europe have resulted in similar national trends in human…

Abstract

Drawing on Price Waterhouse Cranfield survey data, examines whether the common challenges to local authorities in Europe have resulted in similar national trends in human resource management. Compares public and private sector developments in line management responsibility, remuneration, appraisal and management development in six countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Norway, Sweden and the UK. While line mangement responsibility has expanded rapidly in all countries apart from Germany, local authorities generally lag behind the private sector in relation to performance management. Analyses the implications of the observed changes in human resource management policies for managerial roles and concludes by looking at the management development consequences for local authorities.

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Journal of Management Development, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Henrik Holt Larsen

Gives an overview and a critical analysis of the concept of high‐flyer programmes in management development. Based on a discussion of the need for management development…

Abstract

Gives an overview and a critical analysis of the concept of high‐flyer programmes in management development. Based on a discussion of the need for management development in modern knowledge‐ and service‐based organizations, discusses the strengths and weaknesses of traditional management development programmes. In particular, presents the so‐called fast‐track programmes for high‐potential employees. Shows that although management development is supposed to be a vital contributor to organizational competence, learning and change, high‐flyer programmes are still mainly an instrument for individual and personal career development. Presents an alternative interpretation of management development, which emphasizes the match between personal growth and organizational learning, and which links career, organizational development and the competitive advantage of the organization. In conclusion, discusses the implications for practice and research.

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Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Henrik Holt Larsen

Modern global career implies not only an interaction between an organization and an individual but also – and increasingly – a mutual dependency between the two parties…

Abstract

Modern global career implies not only an interaction between an organization and an individual but also – and increasingly – a mutual dependency between the two parties. Whereas the traditional career concept presupposes that the individual employee to a high extent has to adhere to the conditions and opportunities provided by the organization, organizations increasingly have to accept and match the expectations and demands of the employee. In particular, this is found in knowledge intensive organizations providing immaterial “products” like know‐how, complex problem solving, consultancy service, etc. This kind of immaterial “production” not only requires highly skilled and professional employees but also means that the employees possess the core competence of the company – and can carry it out of the organization if they choose to resign. The paper analyzes the dual dependency in global careers and discusses this interdependency from the viewpoints of both individual and organization. In addition, the paper outlines the implications for practitioners and future research.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 23 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Henrik Holt Larsen

Provides an overview and a critical analysis of the concept of high‐flyer programmes in management development. Based on a discussion of the need for management…

Abstract

Provides an overview and a critical analysis of the concept of high‐flyer programmes in management development. Based on a discussion of the need for management development in modern knowledge‐ and service‐based organizations, discusses strengths and weaknesses of traditional management development programmes. In particular, presentsthe so‐called “fast‐track” programmes for high‐potential employees. Shows that although management development is supposed to be a vital contributor to organizational competence, learning, and change, high‐flyer programmes are (still) mainly an instrument for individual and personal career development. Presents an alternative interpretation of management development which emphasizes the match between personal growth and organizational learning, and which links career, organization development and competitive advantage of the organization. In conclusion, discusses implications for practice and research.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 21 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Henrik Pålsson and Ola Johansson

The purpose of this paper is to examine the intention of companies to reduce transportation emissions by 2020 and the barriers and the discriminating factors that affect…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the intention of companies to reduce transportation emissions by 2020 and the barriers and the discriminating factors that affect the reduction.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review identified potential logistical and technical actions and their barriers, and discriminating factors for reducing transportation emissions. A survey of freight transport-intensive industries in Sweden examined the effects of, intention for implementation of and barriers to 12 actions to reduce CO2 emissions from freight transportation. In total, 172 logistics managers responded, representing a response rate of 40.3 per cent.

Findings

Logistics service providers (LSPs) and freight owners are likely to reduce a considerable amount of CO2 emissions from freight transportation by 2020 using a combination of actions. The lowest level of confidence was for reducing CO2 emissions by changing logistics structures, while there was greater confidence by means of operational changes. The actions have few barriers, but there is often a combination of barriers to overcome. Three discriminating factors influence the intention of a firm to reduce transportation emissions: perceived potential, company size and LSP/freight owner. The industrial sector of a freight owner has minor influence. Companies that are particularly likely to reduce emissions are LSPs, large companies, and those that perceive a large reduction potential.

Research limitations/implications

Logistical and technical barriers appear to hinder companies from implementing actions, while organisational barriers and external prerequisites do not. Barriers cannot be used to predict companies’ intentions to reduce transportation emissions. The authors examined the impact of three discriminating factors on reduction of transportation emissions. The research is based on perceptions of well-informed managers and on companies in Sweden.

Practical implications

The findings can be used by managers to identify firms for benchmarking initiatives and emissions-reducing strategies.

Originality/value

The study provides insights into intended CO2 reductions in transportation by 2020. It presents new knowledge regarding barriers and discriminating factors for implementing actions to reduce transportation emissions.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2009

Connie Svabo

The paper aims to provide an overview of the vocabulary for materiality which is used by practice‐based approaches to organizational knowing.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to provide an overview of the vocabulary for materiality which is used by practice‐based approaches to organizational knowing.

Design/methodology/approach

The overview is theoretically generated and is based on the anthology Knowing in Organizations: A Practice‐based Approach edited by Nicolini, Gherardi and Yanow. The overview is built by cross‐reading the analyses in this book. The intellectual traditions which are scrutinized all agree that action is materially embedded – objects and artifacts are central to both knowing and learning. But what is their understanding of materiality? The paper explores which concepts are used, how the interaction between social and material realities is presented, and the role materiality is perceived to have in relation to action.

Findings

Findings are that, within the practice‐based approach, common terms for materiality are “artifact” and “object”. The interaction between social and material realities is grasped as several processes: object‐oriented activity, symbolization, embodiment, performance, alignment and mediation. Material artifacts both stabilize and destabilize organizational action. They may ensure coordination, communication, and control, but they may also create disturbance and conflict.

Originality/value

The paper lists a range of options for conceptualizing how organizational action may be materially mediated. It points out that material entities may both stabilize and destabilize organizational action. It contributes to the further understanding of the tangible, artifactual and object‐related side of organizational knowing.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1949

It has often been said that a great part of the strength of Aslib lies in the fact that it brings together those whose experience has been gained in many widely differing…

Abstract

It has often been said that a great part of the strength of Aslib lies in the fact that it brings together those whose experience has been gained in many widely differing fields but who have a common interest in the means by which information may be collected and disseminated to the greatest advantage. Lists of its members have, therefore, a more than ordinary value since they present, in miniature, a cross‐section of institutions and individuals who share this special interest.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1954

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Abstract

Aarhus Kommunes Biblioteker (Teknisk Bibliotek), Ingerslevs Plads 7, Aarhus, Denmark. Representative: V. NEDERGAARD PEDERSEN (Librarian).

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Henrik Kock, Andreas Wallo, Barbro Nilsson and Cecilia Höglund

In this article, the area of interest is an emerging type of organisation called human resource intermediaries (HRIs), which focus on delivering human resource (HR…

Abstract

Purpose

In this article, the area of interest is an emerging type of organisation called human resource intermediaries (HRIs), which focus on delivering human resource (HR) services to public sector organisations and private companies. The purpose of this article is, thus, to explore HRIs as deliverers of HR services. More specifically, the article will seek to analyse and discuss how employees in HRIs understand their role as providers of HR services to their clients and what characterises the HRIs' work and the nature of their assignments.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical foundation of this article comprises a longitudinal case study of three Swedish HRI organisations. The data consist of interviews with 19 managers and consultants from the three HRIs.

Findings

The results indicate that HRIs want to take on a broad, strategic and proactive role in relation to their customers. However, due to external and internal constraints, such as the HRIs' internal work processes, the nature of their assignments and the client's HR competence level, the roles that HRIs play in practice tend to be more specific, operational and reactive.

Practical implications

An important challenge for HRIs is to avoid being overwhelmed by short‐term and reactive assignments that deliver value to their clients through the use of standard solutions. Long‐term relationships, the structures of ownership and membership, and the availability of unique networks can also prove to be valuable for clients.

Originality/value

This study explores HRIs as an emerging type of organisation within the area of human resources. Compared with HR consultants who specialise in handling specific HR‐related problems, HRIs target the entire flow of human resources in, within, and out of client organisations.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 36 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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