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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Maxwell Fordjour Antwi-Afari, Heng Li, David John Edwards, Erika Anneli Pärn, JoonOh Seo and Arnold Wong

Repetitive lifting tasks have detrimental effects upon balance control and may contribute toward fall injuries, yet despite this causal linkage, risk factors involved…

Abstract

Purpose

Repetitive lifting tasks have detrimental effects upon balance control and may contribute toward fall injuries, yet despite this causal linkage, risk factors involved remain elusive. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effects of different weights and lifting postures on balance control using simulated repetitive lifting tasks.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 20 healthy male participants underwent balance control assessments before and immediately after a fatiguing repetitive lifting tasks using three different weights in a stoop (ten participants) or a squat (ten participants) lifting posture. Balance control assessments required participants to stand still on a force plate with or without a foam (which simulated an unstable surface) while center of pressure (CoP) displacement parameters on the force plate was measured.

Findings

Results reveal that: increased weight (but not lifting posture) significantly increases CoP parameters; stoop and squat lifting postures performed until subjective fatigue induce a similar increase in CoP parameters; and fatigue adversely effected the participant’s balance control on an unstable surface vis-à-vis a stable surface. Findings suggest that repetitive lifting of heavier weights would significantly jeopardize individuals’ balance control on unstable supporting surfaces, which may heighten the risk of falls.

Originality/value

This research offers an entirely new and novel approach to measuring the impact that different lifting weights and postures may have upon worker stability and consequential fall incidents that may arise.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2011

Yan‐nan Gou and Jing Dong

By the re‐interpretation of the Book of Changes (I Ching), this article aims to build a framework for analyzing the structure and the evolvement of leadership.

Abstract

Purpose

By the re‐interpretation of the Book of Changes (I Ching), this article aims to build a framework for analyzing the structure and the evolvement of leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

There are 64 hexagrams in Book of Changes. This article focuses the discussion on Qian hexagram, which is the first and the most important one in all the hexagrams. By using metaphysical concepts, this article builds a dynamic leadership system. This leadership system is composed of the four virtues of Qian (with the meaning of heaven, force), which are as follows: Yuan (creation and origination), Heng (cooperation and development), Li (achievement and sharing), and Zhen (firmness and perseverance). Based on this framework, by using the metaphor of dragon, this article develops an evolvement route of leadership according to the six situations set by the Qian hexagram, which are humble stage, emerging from hiding, trying your best, going up or down, reaching excellence, and starting to fall, and discusses the proper leadership in different situations.

Findings

There are four elements or virtues in leadership. The importance of each virtue and the key points in each of them change as an organization or a venture evolves from one situation to another. Leaders should match their leadership with the specific situation they are in.

Originality/value

According to the knowledge of the authors, this article is the first one in the world trying to set up a leadership system based on Book of Changes, especially Qian hexagram. The implications provided by this article would be very valuable for leaders to more successfully evaluate their situations and change their leaderships according the different challenges they may face.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 30 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2009

Yuanto Kusnadi

I study a series of restructuring activities undertaken by Guoco Group Limited in recent years and the implications on minority shareholders. The divestment of Dao Heng

Abstract

I study a series of restructuring activities undertaken by Guoco Group Limited in recent years and the implications on minority shareholders. The divestment of Dao Heng Bank Group to DBS Group reaped substantial benefits for Guoco, including an enormous cash reserves to fund future investments. However, the cash hoard was not implemented to the best use by Guoco’s managers. Subsequently, Guoco was involved in a number of share buybacks schemes. The share‐buybacks met strong resistance from the minority shareholders and eventually forced out the second largest shareholders. Guoco was also engaged in related party transaction involving its subsidiaries in the property development business. Overall, I find evidences suggesting that corporate restructuring activities enhance the controlling owner’s grip on the group at the expense of the minority shareholders.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 May 2021

Chaturong Napathorn

This paper aims to examine the design and implementation of age-related human resource (HR) practices across organizations located in the institutional contexts of the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the design and implementation of age-related human resource (HR) practices across organizations located in the institutional contexts of the under-researched emerging market economy of Thailand.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-case analysis of five organizations is conducted across industries. The empirical evidence in this paper draws on semistructured interviews and focus groups with older workers of each organization, semistructured interviews with top managers and/or HR managers of each organization, field visits to each organization located in Bangkok and other provinces in Thailand and a review of archival documents and Web-based resources.

Findings

This paper proposes that firms design and implement various age-related HR practices, including the extension of the retirement age, financial planning facilitation, the bundling of maintenance and the bundling of utilization, to ensure that older workers in their firms maintain their current level of functioning to cope with the problem of skill shortage in the Thai labor market, have sufficient savings after retirement to respond to the “productivist informal security” welfare state regime and return to previous levels of functioning after facing losses in their careers.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the fact that this research is based on case studies of age-related HR practices in five firms across industries in Thailand, the findings may not be generalizable to all other firms across countries. Rather, the aim of this paper is to enrich the discussion regarding the design and implementation of age-related HR practices in organizations. Another limitation of this research is that it does not include firms located in several industries, such as the financial services industry and the education industry. Future research may explore age-related HR practices in organizations located in these industries. Moreover, quantitative studies using large samples of firms across industries might also be useful for fostering an in-depth understanding of the design and implementation of age-related HR practices in organizations.

Practical implications

This paper provides practical implications for top managers and/or HR managers of firms in Thailand and other emerging market economies. That said, these top managers and/or HR managers can implement age-related HR practices to respond to the problem of skill shortage in the labor market, ensure that older workers have sufficient savings after retirement and help older workers return to previous levels of functioning after facing deterioration in health conditions and/or losses in their careers.

Social implications

This paper provides policy implications for the government and/or relevant public agencies of Thailand and other emerging market economies that still face a severe skill shortage problem. Older workers who possess tacit knowledge and valuable experience and are still healthy can be considered excellent alternates for firms to help alleviate the skill shortage problem in the labor market. However, firms should implement age-related HR practices to retain this group of employees overtime.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature on comparative institutionalism and human resource management, specifically regarding age-related HR practices, in the following ways. First, this paper examines how firms design and implement age-related HR practices to respond to the country’s macro-level institutions. Additionally, in this paper, the author triangulates the findings from older workers with those from employers to ensure that actual HR practices perceived by older workers are in line with HR practices perceived by top managers and/or HR managers. Moreover, the literature on age-related HR practices has likely overlooked emerging market economies, including the under-researched country of Thailand, because most studies in this area have focused on developed economies. Therefore, the findings in this paper provide an in-depth analysis of the design and implementation of age-related HR practices across firms located in the emerging market economy of Thailand to respond to the national institutional context.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Sonja Gallhofer, Jim Haslam, Elizabeth Monk and Clare Roberts

The purpose of this paper is to elaborate upon the notion of counter accounting, to assess the potentiality of online reports for counter accounting and hence for counter…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to elaborate upon the notion of counter accounting, to assess the potentiality of online reports for counter accounting and hence for counter accounting's emancipatory potential as online reporting, to assess the extent to which this potential is being realised and to suggest ways forward from a critical perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

There are several components to a critical interpretive analysis: critical evaluative analysis, informed to some extent by prior literature in diverse fields; web survey; questionnaire survey; case study.

Findings

Web‐based counter accounting may be understood as having emancipatory potential, some of which is being realised in practice. Not all the positive potential is, however, being realised as one might hope: things that might properly be done are not always being done. And there are threats to progress in the future.

Originality/value

Clarification of a notion of counter accounting incorporating the activity of groups such as pressure groups and NGOs; rare study into practices and opinions in this context through a critical evaluative lens.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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Expert briefing
Publication date: 3 April 2019

Singapore's political challenges.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB242991

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Somchai Hatchaleelaha and Winai Wongsurawat

The purpose of this research is to trace the development of a major player in the health/wellness direct sales industry in Thailand and draw lessons about growth…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to trace the development of a major player in the health/wellness direct sales industry in Thailand and draw lessons about growth strategies and approaches in dealing with common entrepreneurial challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

In preparing the case study narrative, primary data from the direct experience of the company founder were combined with secondary sources of information on the landscape of direct sales industry in Thailand. Key lessons were developed from discussion and reflection on experiences of people involved in the development of the company.

Findings

A multi-billion baht, direct sales business with over 100,000 members was built from the ground up in a span of one decade. Recruiting and retaining members with the right level of entrepreneurial drive is a constant challenge for the growing venture. Incorporating new technology to help manage information about members, customers and stock will play a central role in creating future growth opportunities.

Research limitations/implications

The research represents a single case study so generalization is naturally limited.

Originality/value

Direct sales entails a considerable amount of stigma, resulting in a limited number of frank and detailed analysis of such businesses and their founding entrepreneurs. This study represents an attempt to fill this gap and will hopefully stimulate more investigation into a business model that appears to be thriving in many emerging economies in Southeast Asia.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

It is one of the founding mottos of the modern age that information is power. Without the ability to harness the skills and abilities of employees, companies simply will…

Abstract

It is one of the founding mottos of the modern age that information is power. Without the ability to harness the skills and abilities of employees, companies simply will not survive the increasing pace of change. Another well known fact is that even the best teams can struggle without the right information.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

Zhen Chen, Heng Li and Conrad T.C. Wong

Although the Trip‐ticket System (TTS) has been implemented to manage construction and demolition (C&D) waste in Hong Kong for over three years, problems still exist in the…

Abstract

Although the Trip‐ticket System (TTS) has been implemented to manage construction and demolition (C&D) waste in Hong Kong for over three years, problems still exist in the landfill disposal of the C&D waste. For example, it is reported that fees are difficult to collect from waste transporters for tipping the C&D waste at the landfill site. Based on an examination of the flexibility of the TTS, this paper proposes an e‐commerce model, namely the Webfill system, in order to enhance the TTS. The computational structure of the Webfill system is described and the usefulness of Webfill is evaluated based on a simulation which provides a direct comparison between the existing TTS and the Webfill‐enhanced TTS.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 May 2021

Min-Ren Yan, Chia-Lin Hsu and Heng-Sheng Chen

Abstract

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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